Good News/Bad News, Internet: Your Broom Will Stand Up on Its Own Any Day of the Year

Nikolaeva Elena, iStock via Getty Images
Nikolaeva Elena, iStock via Getty Images

Internet users around world broke out their cleaning supplies on Monday to take part in the "Broom Challenge." According to the viral tweet that kicked off the trend, NASA claimed February 10 is the one day of the year a broom can stand up on its own, thanks to some quirk of the Earth's gravitational pull. The many people who copied the trick proved balancing a broom is indeed possible, but every other part of the tweet was false.

As USA Today reports, you can make a broom stand up straight any day of the year, and it appears that NASA never claimed otherwise. The phenomenon isn't the result of witchcraft or some rare alignment of the planets; it has everything to do with the broom's design.

A typical broom's center of gravity falls between the base of its handle and the top of its head. This low center of gravity gives a broom stability, and if you prop one up on its bristles, it should have no trouble staying upright—no matter where the planets are in the sky.

The challenge went viral recently, but it's been around in some form or another for many years. If you balanced eggs on the spring equinox in elementary school, that trick was also based on a lie. Like brooms, eggs can stand up on their end all year round, and they also owe their stability to a low center of gravity.

[h/t USA Today]

25 Most Popular Songs to Clean the House To, According to Spotify

Sergey Nazarov, iStock via Getty Images
Sergey Nazarov, iStock via Getty Images

Doing the dishes is a lot less grueling when you pretend you're in a Whitney Houston video. Spotify users around the world have discovered the power of music to make chores more fun, as evidenced by hundreds of playlists with words like housework, cleaning, and chores in the title. Before diving into your next home project, queue up these 25 popular songs for cleaning.

To compile the list below, the price comparison site Compare the Market looked at 50,000 songs from 348 Spotify playlists with names referencing housework. The most common song in this category is "Señorita" by Shawn Mendes and Camila Cabello, which appears on 44 of the playlists surveyed. It's followed by "Mr. Brightside" by The Killers in the second slot and "bad guy" by Billie Eilish in third.

The top 25 cleaning songs include a lot of recent hits, but some older tunes are also represented. Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," Whitney Houston's "I Wanna Dance With Somebody," Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama," and Bon Jovi's "Livin' On A Prayer" have been inspiring listeners to pick up their brooms for decades.

You can read the full list below before updating your own cleaning playlist.

  1. Señorita // Shawn Mendes (Featuring Camila Cabello)
  1. Mr. Brightside // The Killers
  1. bad guy // Billie Eilish
  1. Uptown Funk // Mark Ronson
  1. Bohemian Rhapsody // Queen
  1. I Wanna Dance With Somebody // Whitney Houston
  1. Truth Hurts // Lizzo
  1. I Don’t Care // Ed Sheeran (With Justin Bieber)
  1. Shape of You // Ed Sheeran
  1. Someone You Loved // Lewis Capaldi
  1. Old Town Road // Lil Nas X (Featuring Billy Ray Cyrus)
  1. Sunflower // Post Malone
  1. Don't Stop Believin' // Journey
  1. Shake It Off // Taylor Swift
  1. Believer // Imagine Dragons
  1. Wake Me Up // Avicii
  1. Despacito // Luis Fonsi
  1. High Hopes // Panic! At The Disco
  1. Sweet but Psycho // Ava Max
  1. Sweet Home Alabama // Lynyrd Skynyrd
  1. Party In The U.S.A. // Miley Cyrus
  1. Shut Up and Dance // WALK THE MOON
  1. Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It) // Beyoncé
  1. Livin' On A Prayer // Bon Jovi
  1. Billie Jean // Michael Jackson

Dominate Game Night With Godzilla-Themed Monopoly and Jenga

Usaopoly
Usaopoly

Competitive board games have a tendency to bring out players' monstrous sides, and later this year, you'll be able to embrace those destructive impulses with Jenga and Monopoly games inspired by Godzilla.

Both products featuring Japan's iconic mutant menace are a collaboration between games publisher USAopoly (also known as The Op) and entertainment company Toho International, CBR.com reports. The first one, dubbed Monopoly: Godzilla, is billed as a "city-terrorizing twist on the classic board game." The properties available for conquering include Monster Island, Goro’s Workshop, and Kitakami Lake. Instead of the classic game pieces, players use tokens of monsters like Mothra, Rodan, and Godzilla to dominate the board.

The second game pairs so perfectly with Godzilla that it may rival the classic version. In Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition, the block tower resembles a skyscraper taken from downtown Tokyo, and it comes with a cardboard cutout of Godzilla unleashing a beam of atomic breath. With every role of the die, Godzilla moves along the "approach track," increasing the number of blocks removed each turn and hastening the building's destruction.

Godzilla Jenga.
Usaopoly

Monopoly: Godzilla will sell for $40, and Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition will cost $20. You can find them in select stores when they debut in the spring.

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