Treasure Hunters Unearth 22 Spanish Coins From 1715 Shipwreck on Florida Beach

Viktoria Hrekova, iStock via Getty Images
Viktoria Hrekova, iStock via Getty Images

In 1715, a hurricane slammed a fleet of 11 Spanish ships onto a reef off the Florida shoreline. The area is known as the Treasure Coast today, and about $5000 worth of coins from the shipwrecks were recently recovered there, NBC 2 reports.

A group of three friends was scouring Turtle Trail Beach in Indian River County with metal detectors when they stumbled upon the haul. They dug up 22 silver coins believed to date back to the 18th century and found other miscellaneous artifacts from the doomed trade ships.

Coins from the wrecked fleet were first found on the Treasure Coast in the late 1950s, and there's likely more treasure buried beneath the sand waiting to be discovered. A permit is required to claim artifacts that are underwater on state-owned property in Florida, but treasure-hunting on a public beach is fair game.

The team behind this new find has dug up plenty of interesting items in the past. Their previous discoveries include belt buckles, daggers, fine dishware, and cuff links. Jonah Martinez, one of the treasure hunters, once found $6.5 million worth of gold coins.

Though their haul is likely worth thousands, the group doesn't plan to polish the coins and sell them. Instead, they will either keep them in their personal collections or donate them to a museum.

[h/t NBC 2]

The New Apple Watch SE Is Now Available on Amazon

Apple/Amazon
Apple/Amazon

Apple products are notorious for their high price tags. From AirPods to iPads to MacBooks, it can be difficult to find the perfect piece of tech on sale when you are ready to buy. Luckily, for those who have had their eye on a new Apple Watch, the Apple Watch SE is designed with all the features users want but at a lower starting price of $279— and they're available on Amazon right now.

The SE exists as a more affordable option when compared to Apple's new Series 6 line of watches. This less expensive version has many of the same functions of its pricier brethren, except for certain features like the blood oxygen sensor and electrical heart sensor. To make up for the truncated bells and whistles, the SE comes in at least $120 cheaper than the Series 6, which starts at $400 and goes up to $800. The SE comes with technical improvements on previous models as well, such as the fall detection, a faster processor, a larger screen, water resistance, and more.

Now available in 40mm ($279) and 44mm ($309), both SE models offer a variety of colors to choose from, such as sliver, space gray, and pink. If you want cellular connection, you’ll have to pay a bit more for the 40mm ($329) and the 44mm ($359).

For more, head to Amazon to see the full list of offerings from Apple.

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Amazing Interactive Map Shows You Which Dinosaurs Roamed Your Neighborhood Millions of Years Ago

Is this midtown Manhattan?
Is this midtown Manhattan?
Orla/iStock via Getty Images

While most of us know that all sorts of prehistoric creatures once inhabited Earth, you might not realize which ones used to wander around your particular city.

Thanks to this interactive map, you can easily find out. Type in your city name, and you’ll see it plotted on the globe, along with a list of species whose fossils have been discovered nearby. If you click on the name of a species, a new webpage will open with details, images, and a map that shows where else that species lived.

Omaha, Nebraska, for example, was once home to the pteranodon, the trinacromerum, and the mosasaurus. Those last two are both marine reptiles, meaning that Nebraska used to be underwater—which the globe will show you, too.

A screenshot of Nebraska from Ian Webster's interactive globe.Dinosaurpictures.org

In addition to searching by city, you can also see what Earth looked like during a specific time period by choosing an option from the dropdown menu at the top. Choices range from 750 million years ago—the Cryogenian period, when glaciers abounded—to 0 million years ago, which is Earth as we know it today. Using a different dropdown menu on the right, you can view Earth during its many notable “firsts,” including “first land plants,” “first dinosaurs,” “first primates,” and more.

As CNN reports, the map was created by California-based paleontologist Ian Webster, who added to an existing model that mapped plate tectonics and used additional data from GPlates, another piece of plate tectonics software.

“It is meant to spark fascination and hopefully respect for the scientists that work every day to better understand our world and its past,” Webster told CNN. “It also contains fun surprises. For example: how the U.S. used to be split by a shallow sea, the Appalachians used to be very tall mountains comparable to the Himalayas, and that Florida used to be submerged.”

You can find other fun surprises by exploring the map yourself here. For the best experience, you'll want to access the site from a desktop computer or tablet versus a smartphone.

[h/t CNN]