You don’t have to be an early bird to catch a glimpse of next week’s full worm moon—it’ll reach its peak during the day on Monday, March 9, so feel free to look up any time after sundown that night.

As The Old Farmer’s Almanac explains, March’s full moon is known as the “worm moon” because the ground is usually soft enough for earthworm casts (small piles of worm excrement) to start appearing on the surface, and other signs of spring soon follow. It’s also sometimes called the “full sap moon,” since March is also the time of year when sugar maples start leaking sap.

This year’s worm or sap moon is a supermoon, meaning it occurs around the time of the Moon’s perigee, or the point during the Moon’s monthly orbit when it’s closest to Earth. Because March’s full moon is especially close to Earth, it’ll look slightly bigger and brighter than a regular full moon. It won’t technically be 2020’s biggest and brightest—according to EarthSky, that designation will go to the supermoon on April 8, which peaks even closer to the moon’s perigee.

That said, April’s supermoon will only be about 230 miles closer to us than March’s, so they’re definitely both worth an upward glance. May’s full moon, which peaks on May 7, finishes off the trifecta of 2020 full supermoons.

If you’re worried about a series of three consecutive supersized moons wreaking havoc on people’s behavior even more than normal moons allegedly do, rest easy: That’s probably just a myth.

[h/t The Old Farmer’s Almanac]