Astrophysicist Developing Face-Touching Warning Necklace for Coronavirus Gets Magnets Stuck Up His Nose

Nothing good can result from shoving things up your nose. One astrophysicist learned that the hard way.
Nothing good can result from shoving things up your nose. One astrophysicist learned that the hard way.
RusN/iStock via Getty Images

History is full of innovators who have suffered for their ingenuity. Thomas Midgley, Jr., for example, was struck with polio and developed a pulley system to help get himself out of bed. He was strangled by the contraption. Henry Smolinski thought he had a viable prototype for a flying car made from a Ford Pinto in 1973. A wing fell off and killed him.

All things considered, Daniel Reardon got off easy. He only had to have magnets professionally removed from his nose.

Reardon, an Australian astrophysicist, is one of many innovators attempting to assist in the coronavirus pandemic. According to The Guardian, Reardon was in the process of designing a necklace that could alert the wearer when they were in danger of touching their face, one of the primary methods of transmission for viral illness. His idea was to have magnets worn on wrists that would activate a circuit on the necklace.

But then Reardon realized the electronic field in the necklace only completed its circuit without a magnetic field, meaning it buzzed constantly. Having failed in his task and growing bored, Reardon decided to play with the powerful neodymium magnets, clipping them to his earlobes and then his nostrils. This, he said, is when things went “downhill.”

When Reardon removed one set of magnets from outside his nostril, the remaining magnets inside his nose were attracted to one another. Reardon then used more magnets to try and remove them, expecting the outside pull would negate their attraction on the inside of his nose. Unable to control them, he soon found himself with multiple magnets lodged in both nostrils.

After realizing pliers only made the problem worse—they were attracted to the magnets—and that he had failed to achieve his goal of not touching his face, Reardon went to the hospital, where all of them were removed. (One nearly fell down his throat, but he managed to cough it up.) Doctors made an informal diagnosis of self-inflicted injury due to isolation and boredom.

Neodymium magnets are typically sold with cautions, as they are strong enough to “leap” toward each other from several inches or even several feet apart. Though they do not often come with explicit warnings not to shove them inside your nose, it's best avoided.

[h/t The Guardian]

Blue Apron’s Memorial Day Sale Will Save You $60 On Your First Three Boxes

Scott Eisen/Getty Images
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

If you’ve gone through all the recipes you had bookmarked on your phone and are now on a first-name basis with the folks at the local pizzeria, it might be time to introduce a new wrinkle into your weekly dinner menu. But instead of buying loads of groceries and cookbooks to make your own meal, you can just subscribe to a service like Blue Apron, which will deliver all the ingredients and instructions you need for a unique dinner.

And if you start your subscription before May 26, you can save $20 on each of your first three weekly boxes from the company. That means that whatever plan you choose—two or four meals a week, vegetarian or the Signature plan—you’ll save $60 in total.

With the company’s Signature plan, you’ll get your choice of meat, fish, and Beyond foods, along with options for diabetes-friendly and Weight Watchers-approved dishes. The vegetarian plan loses the meat, but still allows you to choose from a variety of dishes like General Tso's tofu and black bean flautas.

To get your $60 off, head to the Blue Apron website and click “Redeem Offer” at the top of the page to sign up.

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Take a Virtual Ride on Hundeprutterutchebane, Denmark’s Infamous ‘Dog Fart’ Rollercoaster

Denmark’s Infamous "Dog Fart" Rollercoaster.
Denmark’s Infamous "Dog Fart" Rollercoaster.
Martin Lewison, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

The internet can transport you to the most famous theme park rides on Earth, like Pirates of the Caribbean and Space Mountain in Disney World. It can also introduce you to obscure attractions you may have trouble believing exist in real life. If you're interested in the stranger side of theme parks, it doesn't get much weirder than Hundeprutterutchebane in Denmark, a.k.a. the dog fart rollercoaster.

Hundeprutterutchebane is one of the more memorable attractions at the Danish amusement park BonBon-Land. While it's not the most intense rollercoaster, it may leave riders feeling nauseated by the end. After boarding cars shaped like a character called Henry the Farting Dog, they zoom past another sculpture of Henry lifting his leg over a pile of poop. The coaster also passes through a tunnel filled with sounds of canine flatulence. You can experience the unique ride in the video below from Theme Park Crazy.

Hundeprutterutchebane isn't the only attraction at BonBon-Land that appeals to an immature sense of humor. There's also a "skid mark" coaster and a "horse dropping" ride, as well as pictures of urinating, defecating, and vomiting cartoon animals throughout the park. Even though it's themed around gross-out humor, BonBon-Land was actually started by a candy company. BonBon specialized in selling candies with cheeky names like "pee diapers," "seagull droppings," and "dog fart."

If you can stomach the video above, check out these bizarre amusement parks from around the world.