9 Strange and Different Easter Treats

The Barefoot Kitchen Witch
The Barefoot Kitchen Witch

Eggs go on sale the week before Easter, so you may as well stock up and do something with those little protein-packed symbols of spring. Not all of these recipes contain eggs, but they are all creative new ideas for spicing up your Easter feast, party, or holiday snacking.

1. RAINBOW EASTER EGGS

If you have egg-shaped food molds, or can fashion your own out of plastic eggs, you can impress your Easter guests with Rainbow Striped Jello Easter Eggs. The Jell-o must be firmer than the regular recipe, and to get the stripes, you’ll need to plan ahead, because each color needs to firm up before you add the next. But the finished product looks amazing when you present them at dessert time.

2. SAFFRON MERINGUE CHICKS

Photograph by Flickr user Lenore Edman.

Yes, you can make Peeps at home. Homemade marshmallow Peeps are possible, but Lenore at Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories made them for gourmet tastes, out of saffron-flavored meringue. The fluffy meringue is made from egg whites (so traditional for Easter), sugar, and the saffron provides the perfect Peeps color. Other people tried them with different flavors, shapes, and colors.

3. DEVILED EGG BUNNY FEET

Among promotions for several contests, Hungry Happenings has a recipe for these Deviled Egg Bunny Feet. Actually two recipes, so you can decide how spicy you want your egg yolks. Then the yolk mixture is colored with pink food dye. Just fill the egg whites and pipe the “toes” on.

4. PEEPSHI

A skilled sushi artist can make sushi look like anything they want to, and a really skilled food artist can take other foods and make them look like sushi. This is "Peepshi," made with marshmallow peeps. And it does contain rice -in the form of Rice Krispies marshmallow treats! The instructions for making them are at Serious Eats.

5. CHOCOLATE ZOMBIE BUNNIES

Miss Demeanor at Criminal Crafts made gory yet edible art out of store-bought chocolate bunnies. With a little imagination and homemade colored icing as paint, you, too, can create a bloody tableau of zombie bunnies feasting on the brains of their enemies on a base of crushed Oreo soil. She even saved money by buying some chocolate rabbits that were already broken.

6. EASTER DOLL BREAD

These cute Croatian bread dolls are a combination of braided challah bread with the addition of an Easter egg face. They are made small, so each guest at the dinner table can have their own loaf. The recipe is here, translated from the original Spanish, which may be more accurate.

7. CHEESECAKE-FILLED CHOCOLATE EASTER EGGS WITH PASSION FRUIT YOLK

Photograph by Flickr user raspberri cupcakes

You can make your own Cadbury eggs, or you can make chocolate Easter eggs that look like candy but taste like something even better -cheesecake! Steph at Raspberri Cupcakes shows us how to make Cheesecake-Filled Chocolate Easter Eggs for a high-class dessert. The cheesecake is the white of the egg, chocolate makes up the shell, and the “yolk” is a spoonful of sauce made from passionfruit pulp, apricot jam, and butter. Not as overwhelmingly sweet as candy eggs, but rich and creamy and decadent.

8. MOSAIC EASTER EGGS

Chinese Tea Eggs are made by boiling eggs, rolling them to crack the shell, and then soaking them in tea. When the shells are removed, it leaves a lovely mosaic pattern. Jayne at The Barefoot Kitchen Witch substituted food dye for the tea, in lots of different colors, and came up with Edible Easter Eggs. She used gel food coloring, and recommends leaving them in the refrigerator to soak overnight.

9. EDIBLE BIRDS NESTS

Once you’ve got eggs and birds, you need a birds nest -one you can eat! Amy Karol at Angry Chicken made birds nests from shredded wheat squares and melted chocolate chips. That’s all. Get the instructions here.

Just remember, you will have failures when you try a brand-new art recipe, so you might want to have a dry run before Easter. Even if you only make one batch, you can always eat your own rejects!

Each State’s Favorite Christmas Candy

CandyStore.com
CandyStore.com

Halloween might be the unrivaled champion of candy-related holidays, but that doesn’t mean Christmas hasn’t carved out a large, chocolate Santa-shaped niche for itself in the sweets marketplace. And, of course, we can’t forget about candy canes, peppermint bark, and the red-and-green version of virtually every other kind of candy.

To find out which candies merrymakers are filling their bowls and stomachs with this holiday season, CandyStore.com analyzed survey responses from more than 32,000 consumers across the nation and compiled their top responses into one mouthwatering map.

As it turns out, 13 states—from California all the way to New Jersey—are reaching for mini Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups over any other holiday candy. Something about that shimmery tinfoil really does make you feel like you’re unwrapping a tiny, tasty gift.

CandyStore.com Top Christmas Candy by State

Source: CandyStore.com

And, if you hoped everyone would kiss candy corn goodbye until next October, we have some bad news: “reindeer” corn, with red, white, and green stripes, is the top choice in a staggering eight states, all of which are in the eastern half of the country. Tied with reindeer corn was peppermint bark, which, given how much white chocolate it contains, is also a pretty polarizing choice.

Candy canes and Hershey’s Kisses clinched third place with a respectable six states apiece, but other Christmas classics didn’t perform nearly as well—chocolate Santas and M&M’s came out on top in only two states each.

After that, there were some rather unconventional competitors, including Starburst, Arkansas’s favorite holiday candy; and Pez, which somehow won the hearts of residents of both Louisiana and New Mexico. 

And, unless you’re time-traveling from the 18th century, you’re probably not surprised that sugarplums didn’t make the map at all—find out what they actually are (hint: not plums!) here. You can also search the full list of state favorite candies below.

Source: CandyStore.com

Relax: Fears of a French Fry Shortage Are Probably Overblown

magann/iStock via Getty Images
magann/iStock via Getty Images

Americans love their French fries. According to The New York Times, Americans eat an average of an average of 115.6 pounds of white potatoes annually, "of which two-thirds are in the form of French fries, potato chips and other frozen or processed potato products."

If you’re someone who annually devours the weight of a small child in fries at McDonald's or elsewhere, you’ll be distressed that potato farmers are facing a shortage—one that could create a fry crisis. But these concerns are likely overblown.

According to Bloomberg, a cold snap in October led to crop-threatening frosts at potato farms in Manitoba in Canada, as well as in North Dakota and Minnesota. In Manitoba, 12,000 acres went unharvested, the equivalent to what was left behind in all of Canada last season. Fields in Idaho and Alberta, Canada, were also hit, but some crops were able to be salvaged. Combined with increased demand in Canada for spuds, North America is looking at a potential tuber deficit.

Why are fries facing shortages, but not mashed potatoes? Fry vendors prefer bigger potatoes for slicing, which tend to be harvested later in the year and were subject to ground freezing and other damage.

This all sounds like cause for national alarm, but the spud industry has taken measures to keep the market fed. Potato experts told Bloomberg that while potato shipments will likely have to be rerouted from more fertile farms and into new distribution channels, the consumer may not notice any difference. A plea for rational thought was echoed by Frank Muir, president of Idaho Potato Commission. Muir told The New York Times that while Idaho is down 1 billion spuds, the state still managed 13 billion. His message to consumers is “Don’t panic … You can still go out and order them as you normally do.”

According to Muir, the major fast food chains—McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King, among others—have temperature-controlled storage for their potatoes and probably have an inventory to fall back on. Rationing won't be needed—unless, of course, you’re watching your weight.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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