10 Weird Things Hockey Fans Have Thrown on the Ice

Getty Images
Getty Images

Whether they want to celebrate a game-winning goal or protest a bad call, hockey fans have come a long way from just throwing hats on the ice. Fans of the Nashville Predators, for example, have achieved a certain infamy for the practice of tossing catfish on the playing surface, a tradition that began in 2002 after the team hosted the Detroit Red Wings. Why catfish? Because Detroit apparently had good luck when fans tossed some marine life (octopi) over the screens beginning in the 1950s; for Detroit transplants who attended Predators games, heaving a Nashville seafood delicacy toward players sounded like a good idea at the time.

We can't convince you of the logic behind that. All we can do is highlight some of the stranger projectiles that have been tossed around hockey games over the years.

1. HAMBURGERS

The Ottawa Senators made big strides in recent years thanks to the goaltending chops of Andrew Hammond, a.k.a. “The Hamburglar,” nicknamed for the way he “robs” opponents of goals. The 27-year-old Hammond was undrafted and had only played in a single NHL game before suiting up as a replacement for both injured starter Craig Anderson as well as backup Robin Lehner, when it seemed like the Sens had no chance of making the postseason.

When Hammond’s net-minding skills got red hot (he ended up finishing the 2014-15 regular season with a whopping 20-1-2 record), Ottawa fans saw fit to honor him by throwing burgers onto the ice. Hammond wasn’t brave enough to take a bite—he said the burgers were “kind of cold”—but in a later game, his teammate Curtis Lazar took a bite to celebrate a victory. Afterward, Lazar tweeted that the burger “could have used some ketchup.”

2. OCTOPUSES

The 2016-17 NHL season broke the Detroit Red Wings' streak of making it to the playoffs for 25 consecutive years. One of their most well known celebrations began on April 15, 1952, when fans (and brothers) Pete and Jerry Cusimano threw an octopus onto the ice at Detroit's Olympia Stadium.

The creature’s eight tentacles were symbolic of the eight wins the Wings needed to win the Stanley Cup at the time, way back when the league consisted of six teams and the playoff format was two best-of-seven series. The Red Wings swept the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Montreal Canadiens to win the Cup, making the cephalopod an unofficial good luck charm for the Wings ever since.

3. RATS

On October 8, 1995, Florida Panthers winger Scott Mellanby was waiting in the dressing room at Miami Arena, ready to take the ice for the third-year franchise's home opener, when he spotted a rat moving across the floor. Mellanby then unleashed a slap shot that killed the intruder, which was memorialized in Magic Marker with the inscription “RIP, Rat 1, Oct. 8, 1995“ on the wall above where it died.

That night, Mellanby scored two goals in the Panthers' 4-3 win and Florida goalie John Vanbiesbrouck dubbed the feat a “rat trick” during the postgame press conference. A fan threw a plastic rat on the ice after a goal during one of the Panthers' next home games, and the custom eventually caught on. As the Panthers' wins continued to pile up, so too did the fake rodents.

During the Panthers' 1996 playoff run, a local supermarket baked rat-shaped cakes and Dan Marino's bar introduced a new drink, the Rat Shooter. Plastic rat reinforcements had to be shipped in to South Florida after the Panthers advanced to the Stanley Cup finals against the Colorado Avalanche. Avs fans, who tossed rat traps on the ice during games in Denver, had the last laugh when Colorado swept the series. The NHL introduced a new rule during the offseason that called for referees to issue the home team a bench minor penalty if fans ignored the public address announcer's warning and continued to throw objects onto the ice after a goal.

4. SNAKES

A Toronto Maple Leafs blogger launched this mini-movement when he suggested, via Twitter, that Arizona Coyotes blogger Travis Hair throw a rattlesnake onto the ice during Game 1 of the Coyotes' first-round playoff series against the Detroit Red Wings in 2010.

Before long, #ThrowTheSnake was the top trending topic in Twitter in Canada, causing Hair to reach out to the team's marketing department about organizing a non-disruptive way to capitalize on the excitement. Hair suggested that fans be permitted to throw rubber snakes after warm-ups and before the Zamboni cleared the ice, but team officials wanted none of it. Anyone who threw a snake, they said, would be ejected.

The decree didn’t matter: After then-Coyotes-defenseman Keith Yandle scored to tie the game during the first period of Game 1, a rubber snake hit the ice. At least it wasn’t a real snake …

5. ALBERTA BEEF

The first two slabs of Alberta beef landed on the ice at Detroit's Joe Louis Arena prior to the start of Game 2 of the 2006 first round Stanley Cup playoff series between the eighth-seeded Edmonton Oilers and the top-seeded Red Wings. "They threw the beef in Detroit, and we won," Oilers winger Georges Laraque told reporters after Edmonton won Game 2 to even the series.

Tossing Alberta beef—the perfect antidote to Detroit's octopus—onto the ice was Edmonton DJ Gary McLachlan's idea, and it didn't take long for the bizarre ritual to become associated with winning.

The Oilers dispatched the Red Wings in six games and, with the beef raining down, advanced all the way to the Stanley Cup finals against the Carolina Hurricanes. But the luck of the beef seemed to run out after that; the Oilers lost the series in seven games.

6. LEOPARD SHARKS

San Jose Sharks fans and cousins Ken Conroy and Mike Gaboury hatched a plan to mimic Detroit's octopus-throwing tradition by throwing a shark onto the ice when San Jose played the Red Wings in the first round of the 1994 playoffs. While the idea didn't materialize into action during that series, the duo vowed to make it happen the next time San Jose and Detroit met in the playoffs.

Flash forward to 2006. Conroy purchased tickets and a pair of 4-foot leopard sharks, and then used an elaborate process to secure one of the sharks to Gaboury's back before heading to the game.

Gaboury, who wore a trench coat to help conceal the shark bulge, waited until the lights dimmed during pregame introductions to unwrap the shark and slide it under his seat. After the Sharks scored late in the first period, he handed the shark to Conroy, who moved to the aisle and prepared for the toss of his life. "I took about three steps and I just heaved it (with two hands) and it slides out to the blue line near the middle of the ice," said Conroy, who was then escorted out of the arena by security. 

The duo was back at it in 2010. Annoyed by people not understanding the symbolism of the first toss, this time they threw a shark with an octopus in its mouth onto the ice.

7. UNDERWEAR

In December 2006, winger Jeff Cowan was put on waivers by the Los Angeles Kings and scooped up by the Vancouver Canucks. Cowan joined the team as a enforcer, not as a goal-scorer, but when he started producing (culminating in a streak that saw him score six goals in four games), one anonymous woman in the stands let him know she enjoyed his efforts by throwing a bra on the ice, and the nickname “Cowan the Bra-barian” was born.

The Canucks embraced the celebratory bustiers, and eventually, the whole team autographed a bra that was auctioned off to raise money for breast cancer research. Cowan and the team would make it to the Western Conference semi-finals that year, but would lose to the Anaheim Ducks. It would seem the bras were the only “cups” they saw that year.

8. JERSEYS

Sometimes fans throw things on the ice because they really, really aren’t happy with their team. The hapless Toronto Maple Leafs, one of the storied original six NHL teams, are currently in the middle of a 50-year Stanley Cup drought and counting—and disgruntled fans who have had enough sparked a controversy in 2015 that was dubbed “Jerseygate.”

The protest—which involved throwing Maple Leafs jerseys on the ice as a symbolic protest of the team’s less-than-stellar play—got three frustrated fans a fine of $65 and a yearlong ban from Toronto’s Air Canada Centre for their disruptive behavior.

9. TEDDY BEARS

Sometimes throwing things on the ice is a good thing! The Christmastime tradition of tossing teddy bears on the ice is usually reserved to minor league teams, and involves fans bringing them to the game and intentionally throwing as many of the plush dolls as they can on the ice after the home team scores its first goal. The bears are then scooped up and donated to kids’ charities.

A 2014 teddy bear toss for the minor league Calgary Hitmen alone netted over 25,000 teddies for needy children.

10. DIMES, PENNIES, QUARTERS, AND ALARM CLOCKS.

Not surprisingly, throwing objects on the ice isn’t a new tradition. Back in 1944, Earl "The Iceman" Davis, who supervised a cleanup crew for the Chicago Black Hawks (then spelled with two words), was featured in a national wire story on fan behavior at hockey games.

"Hockey fans are the craziest people, of that I'm sure,” Davis said. "They do not seem to know it's dangerous to throw things—that a player could break his leg on the junk they toss—and that we are breaking our backs picking it up. One night we scooped up 300 or 400 pennies, several dimes and nickels, and a couple of quarters."

The biggest source of trash, however, was "paper airplanes made with painstaking care from programs by guys in the far, smoke-bound reaches of the upper gallery." These fans were known for picking a spot on the ice and betting who could sail their paper planes closest to the mark. In the same article, Hawks president Bill Tobin recalled the time that a fan in Montreal threw an alarm clock on the ice, saying they "thought it was time we woke up, I guess."

10 Rad Gifts for Hikers

Greg Rosenke/Unsplash
Greg Rosenke/Unsplash

The popularity of bird-watching, camping, and hiking has skyrocketed this year. Whether your gift recipients are weekend warriors or seasoned dirtbags, they'll appreciate these tools and gear for getting most out of their hiking experience.

1. Stanley Nesting Two-Cup Cookset; $14

Amazon

Stanley’s compact and lightweight cookset includes a 20-ounce stainless steel pot with a locking handle, a vented lid, and two insulated 10-ounce tumblers. It’s the perfect size for brewing hot coffee, rehydrating soup, or boiling water while out on the trail with a buddy. And as some hardcore backpackers note in their Amazon reviews, your favorite hiker can take the tumblers out and stuff the pot with a camp stove, matches, and other necessities to make good use of space in their pack.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Osprey Sirrus and Stratos 24-Liter Hiking Packs; $140

Amazon

Osprey’s packs are designed with trail-tested details to maximize comfort and ease of use. The Sirrus pack (pictured) is sized for women, while the Stratos fits men’s proportions. Both include an internal sleeve for a hydration reservoir, exterior mesh and hipbelt pockets, an attachment for carrying trekking poles, and a built-in rain cover.

Buy them: Amazon, Amazon

3. Yeti Rambler 18-Ounce Bottle; $48

Amazon

Nothing beats ice-cold water after a summer hike or a sip of hot tea during a winter walk. The Yeti Rambler can serve up both: Beverages can stay hot or cold for hours thanks to its insulated construction, and its steel body (in a variety of colors) is basically indestructible. It will add weight to your hiker's pack, though—for a lighter-weight, non-insulated option, the tried-and-true Camelbak Chute water bottle is incredibly sturdy and leakproof.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mappinners Greatest 100 Hikes of the National Parks Scratch-Off Poster; $30

Amazon

The perfect gift for park baggers in your life (or yourself), this 16-inch-by-20-inch poster features epic hikes like Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. Once the hike is complete, you can scratch off the gold foil to reveal an illustration of the park.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Geographic Adventure Edition Road Atlas; $19

Amazon

Hikers can use this brand-new, updated road atlas to plan their next adventure. In addition to comprehensive maps of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Mexico, they'll get National Geographic’s top 100 outdoor destinations, useful details about the most popular national parks, and points on the maps noting off-the-beaten-path places to explore.  

Buy it: Amazon

6. Adventure Medical Kits Hiker First-Aid Kit; $25

Amazon

This handy 67-piece kit is stuffed with all the things you hope your hiker will never need in the wilderness. Not only does it contain supplies for pain, cuts and scrapes, burns, and blisters (every hiker’s nemesis!), the items are organized clearly in the bag to make it easy to find tweezers or an alcohol wipe in an emergency.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiker Hunger Ultralight Trekking Poles; $70

Amazon

Trekking poles will help increase your hiker's balance and stability and reduce strain on their lower body by distributing it to their arms and shoulders. This pair is made of carbon fiber, a super-strong and lightweight material. From the sweat-absorbing cork handles to the selection of pole tips for different terrain, these poles answer every need on the trail. 

Buy it: Amazon

8. Leatherman Signal Camping Multitool; $120

Amazon

What can’t this multitool do? This gadget contains 19 hiking-friendly tools in a 4.5-inch package, including pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, saw, knife, hammer, wire cutter, and even an emergency whistle.

Buy it: Amazon

9. RAVPower Power Bank; $24

Amazon

Don’t let your hiker get caught off the grid with a dead phone. They can charge RAVPower’s compact power bank before they head out on the trail, and then use it to quickly juice up a phone or tablet when the batteries get low. Its 3-inch-by-5-inch profile won’t take up much room in a pack or purse.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Pack of Four Indestructible Field Books; $14

Amazon

Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail will be a match for these waterproof, tearproof 3.5-inch-by-5.5-inch notebooks. Your hiker can stick one in their pocket along with a regular pen or pencil to record details of their hike or brainstorm their next viral Tweet.

Buy it: Amazon

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12 Oversized Facts About JNCO Jeans

In 1998, Fortune magazine declared, "If you can't pronounce 'JNCO,' you're hopelessly out of touch." JNCOs—which at one point stood for "Judge None, Choose One," "Journey of the Chosen Ones," or maybe even the slightly less rebellious “Jeans Co.”—were quintessentially '90s jeans, worn largely (at least at first) by skaters and nonconformists and known for mega-wide leg openings. Though the clothing line enjoyed only fleeting relevance, the clownish silhouettes have been immortalized through regular nostalgia-fueled posts and Onion punchlines. Here are a few things you might not have known about JNCOs.

1. JNCO was an American-inspired brand founded by two French men.

JNCO was founded in 1985 by Haim and Yaakov Revah, two media-shy brothers from France who go by "Milo" and "Jacques," respectively. Together, the two operated Revatex, the Los Angeles parent company which began producing mostly private-label apparel for retail chains before eventually introducing JNCOs to the public in 1993. Los Angeles served as an appropriate location for its launch: According to The Los Angeles Times, JNCO was born out of Milo's love for the city's culture—particularly, that of its wide-pant-wearing Latino population he encountered in east Los Angeles neighborhoods. Though the Revahs were born in Morocco and raised in France, they always expressed an interest in American culture. Milo told The Times that among his favorite pastimes was watching reruns of Starsky and Hutch and Charlie's Angels.

2. JNCO actively rejected “conventionalism” throughout the ‘90s.

From the start, JNCO's mission, according to its website, was to “Challenge conventionalism. Explore the unfamiliar. Honor individuality.” One could argue that JNCO was unwavering on the first part of its mission throughout the '90s, defining itself in opposition to mainstream brands like Levi's. JNCO's target demographic was made abundantly clear through its sponsorships of extreme-sports events, aiming for surfers and skateboarders between 12 and 20 years old. In a 1998 Fortune article, writer Nina Munk speculated that ads taken out in magazines like Electric Ink and Thrasher were there to bait "cool young (mainly white) men." The article also mentioned that Revatex would often hand out free clothes to '90s tastemakers, including extreme athletes Todd "Wild Man" Lyons and Sean Mallard, as well as members of Limp Bizkit and prominent DJs in the rave scene.

3. JNCO embraced a “suburban” brand following the bankruptcy of its main retailer.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In 1994, JNCO's main retailer, the Joppa, Maryland-based jeans chain Merry-Go-Round, filed for bankruptcy; two years later, it liquidated all of its stores. The Revahs withdrew all JNCOs merchandise from Merry-Go-Round before the stores liquidated and recruited Steven Sternberg to help rebrand the jeans.

Sternberg, a New York retail guru who had made waves working with B.U.M. Equipment—another Los Angeles-based clothing line popular among mall dwellers—told them that "this is not an urban line." He suggested the company should, instead, align itself with surf and skate brands like Billabong and Quiksilver. "We would not sell to stores that carried FUBU or Cross Colours," Sternberg told Racked. "We retooled JNCO from being an urban line to being strictly a suburban line."

4. JNCO Jeans accounted for 10 percent of PacSun’s business in 1997.

Thomas Hawk, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Its suburban branding in place, JNCO found a fruitful partner in Anaheim's on-the-rise retailer Pacific Sunwear (PacSun). "This [PacSun] management team has great ability to anticipate what's hot," a Baltimore stock analyst told The Wall Street Journal in 1996. The analyst was, of course, speaking of the retailer's recent partnership with JNCO jeans—a move which a later financial report would show was just as lucrative for JNCO as it was for the Anaheim retailer. ''People can go anywhere to buy Levi's,'' Carl Womack, Pacific Sunwear's chief financial officer, told The New York Times in 1997. ''Fashion-oriented kids don't come to us for that. The only way we can distinguish ourselves is with smaller brands. JNCO has gone from almost none of our business to about 10 percent over a period of a year.''

5. The secret to JNCO’s (short-lived) success was its hands-on promotion.

Asked what the secret to their success was in 1997, Tam Miller, vice president of sales and marketing, told The New York Times that it was all about close contact with the customer base. "We pay very close attention to everything they say. In my neighborhood, there is a skating ramp and I go there and bring samples all the time. When I go home, all the kids run around and ask, 'What's new?'" Other accounts confirm this statement to be true: 30-year-old Joseph Janus, who had joined JNCO as director of advertising and marketing, was spotted at a New York rock club, evangelizing to teens with his seemingly relatable jeans and baseball cap. He'd even asked kids to take off their pants and trade them in for JNCOs, according to Ad Age.

6. There was a time when JNCO’s future looked far brighter than Levi’s.

In a 1997 New York Times article, 18-year-old college student Sam Norris named Guess, Tommy Hilfiger, and JNCOs as his favorite jeans—and declared Levi's officially uncool. "Levi's are sort of, I don't know, outdated or something," he told the paper. Levi Strauss had announced mass layoffs (around 1000 employees, in the Times' estimation) due to slowly growing sales and rising costs. All the while, JNCO's sales were at an all-time high: In 1997, the privately held company's sales were estimated by Ad Age to be between $40 million and $100 million; by 1998—at its peak—JNCO recorded sales of $186.9 million.

7. JNCOs were banned from California’s Orange County schools.

The Los Angeles Times reported in 1998 that Orange County schools were banning wide-leg jeans, putting JNCO and Kikwear on the list of verboten legwear. Administrators told the newspaper that they were fearful of students tripping over the baggy pants, as well as using the extra "yardage" to hide weapons. Some students at the time of the article being published believed the administrative move had subtext—that the pants signified gang affiliation. "They think it's gangster," one student said. "It doesn't matter what you wear. If you look at someone wrong or they don't like you, they're still going to go after you."

8. Counterfeit JNCO jeans were a huge problem in Chicago.

Revatex and PacSun weren't the only ones profiting off of the rise of wide-legged jeans in the '90s. By the mid-'90s, Chicago counterfeiters were taking advantage of the fad, according to The Chicago Tribune. Revatex executives who had flown to Chicago to expand their JNCO market discovered that many stores were already selling pants claiming to be JNCOs. The company was left with no choice but to hire a private-investigation firm to help them take the fakes off the market. "There are literally times when you can't market your products in some cities because counterfeiters have already marketed it," Karl Manders, a chief executive officer who worked with Revatex in their counterfeit battle, told The Tribune.

9. The sales of JNCO jeans “sagged badly” in 1999.

While JNCO had earned its denim crown from 1995 and 1998—with sales climbing from $36 million to $186.9 million—its numbers suffered in the following year. Racked reports that in 1999, sales dipped to $100 million. Consequently, parent company Revatex shut down its Los Angeles facility, leaving 250 workers jobless.

That same year, The New York Times published the deep-dive "Levi's Blues," an investigation into the many lives of the classic denim company. It featured a 16-year-old from Las Vegas, New Mexico who explained that "JNCO [was] more last year": "Now it's more Polo and Tommy Hilfiger and Boss," he said. The writer Hal Espen went on to note that the sales of JNCO jeans had been "sagging badly":

"As my informants at Villa Linda Mall [in Santa Fe, New Mexico] told me, really baggy, the thuggish thing, is fading out, and boys and girls are embracing more of a preppy look. 'Not really a slim, tapered leg,' one boy told me, 'but not going for humongous, either.' Perhaps it's another paradigm shift. That would be cool, wouldn't it?"

10. JNCOs were deemed “uncool” by Hot Topic.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Cindy Levitt, merchandise manager for Hot Topic, told The Los Angeles Times in 2000 that JNCOs were a little too mainstream for her store's clientele. "You still see JNCO at raves," she said. "But it's a little uncool for our customer. It's at too many doors in the mall." Levitt was speaking to JNCOs growing presence among "pedestrian" shops like J.C. Penney—where, in 1998, JNCO was the top-selling brand among young men—as well as PacSun, Ron Jon Surf Shop and The Buckle.

11. JNCOs made a comeback in 2015—although they weren't how most remembered them.

Thanks to the Chinese trading company Guotai Litian—which bought JNCO for seven figures—as well as the cyclical nature of fashion, JNCOs relaunched as an all-purpose denim company in 2015, with a line that looked a little less unconventional. While signature wide-legged jeans were still available through the "Heritage collection" in 20 to 23 inches, the company cashed in on athleisure. And as Joseph Cohen, director of strategic planning at Guotai USA told TODAY, the new line has a different target demographic in mind: “between 20 and 40 years old."

12. JNCOs relaunched under new ownership in 2019.

In 2018, Milo Rivah bought back the JNCO license and reimagined the jeans (which had apparently suffered from quality issues in recent years) with his daughter, Camilla. In June 2019, they relaunched the brand with a return to its wide-legged form: There were eight styles—including a 50-inch-wide pair reminiscent of the popular "Crime Scenes" jean—with price tags ranging from $130 to $250. If you'd like to relive your '90s glory days, you can buy a pair of jeans on JNCO's website.