6 Disproportionately Common Names By Profession

The Washington Post pulled together five different data visualization charts to show how much you can tell about a person based on their name. Not only are details like your age, your state, and your political leanings inferred based on your moniker, your profession can be as well. While it’s been well documented that a person’s name can either be a boon or a deterrent in the job application process, this handy chart from Verdant Labs (the makers of a baby name app) shows the names that are disproportionately more likely to fall into certain career paths.

Verdant Labs // Click here for a larger version.

Looking across a spectrum of jobs, from creative to blue-collar to celebrity-driven, Verdant Labs used public records to map out the six names that have a higher percentage of showing up in a given profession (which does not equate to the six most common in that field—just the proportion of, say, interior designers named Lynne compared to the number of Lynnes out there). For example, those with the name Louise or Clement are perhaps more likely to becomes judges than Vanessa or Kurt, who are graphic designers. 

Some of the name bubbles read a little like joke categories, particularly the musician ones. Can't we all name a couple of famous songwriters named Stevie or Billy? Or guitarists named Mick or Eddie? But my hometown's meteorologist was named Mike, so maybe there is some truth to this fun visualization chart.

[h/t The Washington Post]

Amazon Customers Are Swearing by a $102 Mattress

Linenspa
Linenspa

Before you go out and spend hundreds—if not thousands—of dollars on a new mattress, you may want to turn to Amazon. According to Esquire, one of the most comfortable mattresses on the market isn’t from Tempur-Pedic, Casper, or IKEA. It’s a budget mattress you can buy on Amazon for as little as $102.

Linenspa's 8-inch memory foam and innerspring hybrid mattress has more than 24,000 customer reviews on Amazon, and 72 percent of those buyers gave it five stars. The springs are topped by memory foam and a quilted top layer that make it, according to one customer, a “happy medium of both firm and plush.”

Linenspa

Perhaps because of its cheap price point, many people write that they first purchased it for their children or their guest room, only to find that it far exceeded their comfort expectations. One reviewer who bought it for a guest room wrote that “it is honestly more comfortable than the expensive mattress we bought for our room.” Pretty impressive for a bed that costs less than some sheet sets.

Getting a good night's sleep is vital for your health and happiness, so do yourself a favor and make sure your snooze is as comfortable as possible.

The mattress starts at $102 for a twin and goes up to $200 for a king. Check it out on Amazon.

[h/t Esquire]

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How Coronavirus and 31 Other Infectious Diseases and Viruses Got Their Names

Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Dr_Microbe/iStock via Getty Images

As you may already know, the corona in coronavirus has no relation to a certain refreshing beer often served with a slice of lime. Corōna means “crown” in Latin—and Spanish and Italian, too—and virologists chose it in 1968 to describe the group of viruses characterized by crown-like spikes that protrude from their surfaces.

So how do other viruses and diseases get their names? Based on the infographic below, created by Adam Aleksic for his website, The Etymology Nerd, there isn’t just one way. Some, like the coronavirus, are named for how they look under a microscope. The rota in rotavirus, for example, which means “wheel” in Latin, reflects the virus’s wheel-like appearance when viewed beneath an electron microscope.

Others are named after the locations where they were discovered or studied. In 1947, scientists named a newly identified mosquito-borne virus after Uganda’s Zika Forest. In 1977, Yale researchers investigating a string of pediatric arthritis cases in the town of Lyme, Connecticut, started referring to the illness as “Lyme arthritis.” Later, the name was modified to “Lyme disease” when scientists realized patients were exhibiting other symptoms, too.

Still others are characterized by the symptoms they cause. People with tetanus—from the Greek tetanos, for “tension”—usually experience muscle stiffness, and the skin of yellow fever sufferers often takes on a yellow tint due to jaundice.

Find out the origins of malaria, measles, and more below. And follow The Etymology Nerd on Instagram for more fascinating etymological explanations.

Unsurprisingly, there's a lot of Latin in this infographic.The Etymology Nerd