It looks like the small Seattle home that resembles the house from the Pixar movie Up has evaded demolition once again thanks to an undecided non-profit. 

The Edith Macefield House, named for its former owner, was slated for demolition after the new owners realized it was too expensive to be renovated. Thankfully, the house's broker, Paul Thomas, confirmed in a statement that the owners will be donating the iconic building and selling the land. The house will have to be moved to a new location, but it will be safe from the wrecking ball. 

“The house really will float away, but not by air,” Thomas said in a statement. “I can’t possibly imagine a more wonderful ending for this chapter of the Edith Macefield story.”

When the late owner Edith Macefield refused to sell her modest home for one million dollars in 2006, she became a local hero. Large commercial buildings surrounded and towered over her tiny farmhouse, and despite the money offers and loud noises of construction, she stayed put. “I went through World War II; the noise doesn’t bother me," she said.

The tenacious woman passed away in 2008 and left the house to Barry Martin, a superintendent who worked on one of the buildings around her home. She didn't provide any information on what she would like to happen to the house. Martin, who was her friend, believed that she didn't care what happened to the house, as long as it existed long enough for her to live in it. Martin sold the house for $300,000, but it wasn't able to be renovated due to its age and the city's building codes, so it will be moved instead. 

While Pixar denies using the house as its inspiration, many people have come to refer to the home as the Up house. Residents in the area have considered it an important part of the community and have even named a music festival in its honor. The farmhouse's future location will be announced on August 4. 

[h/t: Mashable]