This Bible Museum Features Rejected Celebrity Wax Figures

iStock.com/Cecilie_Arcurs
iStock.com/Cecilie_Arcurs

Keen-eyed tourists paying a visit to the BibleWalk Museum in Mansfield, Ohio may spot some familiar faces. That’s because tucked into scenes of Old Testament miracles and the life of Christ are surprise appearances from celebrities like Steve McQueen and Ringo Starr

The founder of BibleWalk, Pastor Richard Diamond, began pursuing his dream of opening a biblical wax museum in the early 1980s. In order to keep costs low, he searched for used figures from different sources, one of which was the Madame Tussaud’s Museum in Arkansas, so many of BibleWalk’s 300 figures are celebrity wax figure museum rejects.

Unsurprisingly, the museum doesn’t like to advertise this unintended claim to fame. They even go so far as to make up the figures in ways that hide their originally intended appearances. But visitors who look carefully will see celebrity cameos from John Travolta as King Solomon, Elizabeth Taylor as the Pharaoh’s wife, and Prince Phillip as an angel of Christ. 

According to one museum employee, the secondhand celebrities haven’t been a distraction for guests—most of them get caught up in the Bible stories while they’re there. Not to mention there’s a reason that these figures were sold for so cheap: the model of Jesus being baptized looks less like Tom Cruise and more like his less-famous half brother. 

[h/t: The Telegraph]

Amazon Customers Are Swearing by a $102 Mattress

Linenspa
Linenspa

Before you go out and spend hundreds—if not thousands—of dollars on a new mattress, you may want to turn to Amazon. According to Esquire, one of the most comfortable mattresses on the market isn’t from Tempur-Pedic, Casper, or IKEA. It’s a budget mattress you can buy on Amazon for as little as $102.

Linenspa's 8-inch memory foam and innerspring hybrid mattress has more than 24,000 customer reviews on Amazon, and 72 percent of those buyers gave it five stars. The springs are topped by memory foam and a quilted top layer that make it, according to one customer, a “happy medium of both firm and plush.”

Linenspa

Perhaps because of its cheap price point, many people write that they first purchased it for their children or their guest room, only to find that it far exceeded their comfort expectations. One reviewer who bought it for a guest room wrote that “it is honestly more comfortable than the expensive mattress we bought for our room.” Pretty impressive for a bed that costs less than some sheet sets.

Getting a good night's sleep is vital for your health and happiness, so do yourself a favor and make sure your snooze is as comfortable as possible.

The mattress starts at $102 for a twin and goes up to $200 for a king. Check it out on Amazon.

[h/t Esquire]

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Notre-Dame Cathedral’s New Spire Will Be an Exact Replica of the Old One

This wasn't actually the original spire.
This wasn't actually the original spire.
Michael McCarthy, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Just days after a fire ravaged Notre-Dame de Paris on April 15, 2019, France’s then-prime minister Édouard Philippe announced plans for an international competition to design a new, more modern spire “suited to the techniques and challenges of our time.”

Though not everyone supported the initiative, architects from all over the world made quick work of sharing their innovative ideas. Some imagined spires made from unconventional materials—Brazilian architect Alexandre Fantozzi favored stained glass, for example, and France’s Mathieu Lehanneur designed a flame-shaped spire covered in gold leaf—while others envisioned using the space for something completely different. Sweden’s Ulf Mejergren Architects suggested a rooftop swimming pool, and Studio NAB proposed a greenhouse.

But those architects will have to bring their inventive designs to life elsewhere. As artnet News reports, the French Senate recently passed legislation mandating that the cathedral be restored to its “last known visual state.” President Emmanuel Macron released a statement endorsing the decision and explaining that city officials would look to add a “contemporary gesture” in the “redevelopment of the surroundings of the cathedral” instead.

Though the 800-ton, 305-foot-tall spire was certainly one of Notre-Dame’s most striking features, it wasn’t actually part of the original building. The first spire, constructed between 1220 and 1230, began to deteriorate after several centuries, and it was removed in the late 1700s. The cathedral went spire-less until 1859, when builders completed work on architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc’s new design—which, according to Popular Mechanics, wasn’t an exact replica of the original.

A 17th-century etching of Notre-Dame with its original spire.I. Silvestre, Wellcome Images, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 4.0

This event could have set the precedent for updating the spire this time, but it’s possible that government officials were motivated by more than a simple commitment to architectural consistency. Last year, Macron had promised that the restoration would be completed by 2024, when Paris is scheduled to host the Summer Olympics. It’s an ambitious goal, and a worldwide competition to come up with a new design could have delayed the process more than reconstructing the spire as it once was.

[h/t artnet News]