What's Happening When We Hear the Voice in Our Head?

Image Courtesy of iStock
Image Courtesy of iStock

The voice we hear in our head comes in many forms. It can psyche us up for a big interview, help us remember an important speech, or guilt-trip us into calling our grandparents more often. The researchers behind the Hearing the Voice project believe that studying the science behind inner speech will give us a better understanding of language, mental illness, and ourselves. 

Researchers at Durham University in England have been developing the project since 2010. Their scope stretches far outside the medical world with team members hailing from the fields of neuroscience, English literature, medical humanities, philosophy, psychology, and theology. One of the main goals of the project is a better understanding of inner voices as they relate to mental disorders, and one way they’ve been doing that is by studying the voices we all hear on a daily basis. 

Scientists already know that inner speech shares a lot of similarities with externalized speech in terms of what’s happening with our brains and bodies. When that voice “speaks” in our head, our larynx is making subtle muscle movements to accompany it. The same part of our brain we use to speak out loud is also active when we speak internally. 

Knowing this, researchers can compare what’s happening to the brain when speaking aloud to what happens to it during auditory verbal hallucinations (a term often used to describe the voices heard by people suffering from mental illness). One  recent study was conducted by scientists in Finland in which they scanned the brains of participants experiencing such hallucinations then asked them to purposely imagine the same voice. The experiment showed that while similar parts of the brain did light up, the main difference was in the supplementary motor area, which was much less active when the subjects heard voices. This supports the theory that we rely on signals from this part of the brain in order to recognize an inner voice as “ours.”

Looking at neuroscience is important to the Hearing the Voice project, but listening to and discussing first-hand experiences is also a huge factor. Last year, Hearing the Voice teamed up with Edinburgh’s International Book Festival to look at the experiences of hearing inner voices from the perspectives of writers and readers. The event included interviews, workshops, and panel discussions aimed at shedding light on the subject. 

After receiving another five years of funding this spring, the Hearing the Voice project is continuing to find creative ways to explore the internal voices that affect us all.

[h/t: The Guardian]

What Are the 12 Days of Christmas?

Antoninapotapenko/iStock via Getty Images
Antoninapotapenko/iStock via Getty Images

Everyone knows to expect a partridge in a pear tree from your true love on the first day of Christmas ... But when is the first day of Christmas?

You'd think that the 12 days of Christmas would lead up to the big day—that's how countdowns work, as any year-end list would illustrate—but in Western Christianity, "Christmas" actually begins on December 25 and ends on January 5. According to liturgy, the 12 days signify the time in between the birth of Christ and the night before Epiphany, which is the day the Magi visited bearing gifts. This is also called "Twelfth Night." (Epiphany is marked in most Western Christian traditions as happening on January 6, and in some countries, the 12 days begin on December 26.)

As for the ubiquitous song, it is said to be French in origin and was first printed in England in 1780. Rumors spread that it was a coded guide for Catholics who had to study their faith in secret in 16th-century England when Catholicism was against the law. According to the Christian Resource Institute, the legend is that "The 'true love' mentioned in the song is not an earthly suitor, but refers to God Himself. The 'me' who receives the presents refers to every baptized person who is part of the Christian Faith. Each of the 'days' represents some aspect of the Christian Faith that was important for children to learn."

In debunking that story, Snopes excerpted a 1998 email that lists what each object in the song supposedly symbolizes:

2 Turtle Doves = the Old and New Testaments
3 French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues
4 Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists
5 Golden Rings = the first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.
6 Geese A-laying = the six days of creation
7 Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments
8 Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes
9 Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit
10 Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments
11 Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles
12 Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

There is pretty much no historical evidence pointing to the song's secret history, although the arguments for the legend are compelling. In all likelihood, the song's "code" was invented retroactively.

Hidden meaning or not, one thing is definitely certain: You have "The Twelve Days of Christmas" stuck in your head right now.

What Are the 12 Days of Christmas?

Tevarak/iStock via Getty Images
Tevarak/iStock via Getty Images

Everyone knows to expect a partridge in a pear tree from your true love on the first day of Christmas ... But when is the first day of Christmas?

You'd think that the 12 days of Christmas would lead up to the big day—that's how countdowns work, as any year-end list would illustrate—but in Western Christianity, "Christmas" actually begins on December 25th and ends on January 5th. According to liturgy, the 12 days signify the time in between the birth of Christ and the night before Epiphany, which is the day the Magi visited bearing gifts. This is also called "Twelfth Night." (Epiphany is marked in most Western Christian traditions as happening on January 6th, and in some countries, the 12 days begin on December 26th.)

As for the ubiquitous song, it is said to be French in origin and was first printed in England in 1780. Rumors spread that it was a coded guide for Catholics who had to study their faith in secret in 16th-century England when Catholicism was against the law. According to the Christian Resource Institute, the legend is that "The 'true love' mentioned in the song is not an earthly suitor, but refers to God Himself. The 'me' who receives the presents refers to every baptized person who is part of the Christian Faith. Each of the 'days' represents some aspect of the Christian Faith that was important for children to learn."

In debunking that story, Snopes excerpted a 1998 email that lists what each object in the song supposedly symbolizes:

2 Turtle Doves = the Old and New Testaments
3 French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues
4 Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists
5 Golden Rings = the first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.
6 Geese A-laying = the six days of creation
7 Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments
8 Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes
9 Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit
10 Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments
11 Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles
12 Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

There is pretty much no historical evidence pointing to the song's secret history, although the arguments for the legend are compelling. In all likelihood, the song's "code" was invented retroactively.

Hidden meaning or not, one thing is definitely certain: You have "The Twelve Days of Christmas" stuck in your head right now.

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