The Palace Built By a Postman, Using Stones From His Route

M Maselli, Flickr // CC BY-2.0
M Maselli, Flickr // CC BY-2.0

by Jenny Morrill

The Palais Idéal in Hauterives, France is a unique structure. It is made entirely out of stones that postman Ferdinand Cheval collected on his mail route.

One night, Cheval dreamed about building a palace. He thought nothing of this dream for years, until one day in the spring of 1879, when his foot caught on an unusual-looking rock during his postal route. The rock was so fascinating to Cheval that he took it home to admire it. It also gave him an idea.

For the next 33 years, Cheval continued picking up more stones during his postal route, first putting them in his pockets, then graduating to a basket, and finally using a wheelbarrow. Each one of the stones was hand-selected by Cheval to play a part in the construction of his dream palace.

For more than three decades, Cheval spent his nights building his home by the light of an oil lamp, and his days delivering the mail. He completed work on the palace in 1912.

Today, the palace is a protected landmark and is open to visitors. Though Cheval wished to be buried in his palace when he died, this was illegal in France at the time. So he spent an additional eight years building a mausoleum for himself in the town cemetery. He finished just in time, too; Cheval passed away on August 19, 1924, approximately one year after completing the mausoleum, which remains his final resting place.

2020 World Monuments Watch: 25 Historic and Cultural Landmarks That Are At Risk

Razvan/iStock via Getty Images
Razvan/iStock via Getty Images

Whether it's due to their age, size, or ubiquity in pop culture, certain landmarks can feel invincible. But that's far from the case: Each year, some of the most famous places on Earth are faced with new threats, including war, urban development, and climate change. In an effort to boost awareness of these vulnerable sites, the World Monuments Fund (WMF) has released its biennial roundup of 25 historic and cultural monuments around the world that need protection.

To finalize entries for its 2020 World Monuments Watch, the WMF evaluated more than 250 nominations from various groups and individuals. The final list includes monuments and cultural sites from five continents. Some, like Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, are threatened by weakened conservation laws, while others—like Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris—have been damaged by recent disasters.

The WMF plans to partner with the local communities around each site on the list to develop specific conservation plans to help save these landmarks. In spring of 2020, the program's founding sponsor, American Express, will donate $1 million toward the initiatives of a select group of sites from the list. To see every place included in the 2020 World Monuments Watch, check out the list below.

  1. Koutammakou, the Land of the Batammariba // Benin and Togo

  1. Ontario Place // Canada

  1. Rapa Nui National Park // Chile

  1. Alexan Palace // Egypt

  1. Notre-Dame de Paris // France

  1. Tusheti National Park // Georgia

  1. Gingerbread Neighborhood // Port-au-Prince, Haiti

  1. Historic Water Systems of the Deccan Plateau // India

  1. Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Stadium // India

  1. Mam Rashan Shrine // Iraq

  1. Inari-yu Bathhouse // Japan

  1. Iwamatsu District // Japan

  1. Canal Nacional // Mexico

  1. Choijin Lama Temple // Mongolia

  1. Traditional Burmese Teak Farmhouses // Myanmar

  1. Chivas and Chaityas of the Kathmandu Valley // Nepal

  1. Anarkali Bazaar // Pakistan

  1. Sacred Valley of the Incas // Peru

  1. Kindler Chapel, Pabianice Evangelical Cemetery // Poland

  1. Courtyard Houses of Axerquía // Spain

  1. Bennerley Viaduct // United Kingdom

  1. Bears Ears National Monument // USA

  1. Central Aguirre Historic District // USA

  1. San Antonio Woolworth Building // USA

  1. Traditional Houses in the Old Jewish Mahalla of Bukhara // Uzbekistan

A 120-Year-Old Denmark Lighthouse Rides Away From Coastal Erosion on Rollerblades

Carlo Alberto Conti/iStock via Getty Images
Carlo Alberto Conti/iStock via Getty Images

Beachgoers know all too well what happens when you plop down near the ocean during low tide—it creeps slowly closer until one enthusiastic wave soaks all your towels and escapes with your flip-flops. Luckily, you can to relocate your belongings farther inland, or simply check the tide tables before settling down to sunbathe.

For a 120-year-old Danish lighthouse, it’s not that simple. When Northern Denmark’s Rubjerg Knude lighthouse was built in 1899, there was more than 650 feet of land separating it from the coast. According to Condé Nast Traveler, that seemingly safe expanse of sand had eroded to fewer than 20 feet by the 2000s.

To rescue the 1000-ton landmark from imminent destruction, local mason Kjeld Pedersen approached the Danish government with an innovative proposition: Slide the lighthouse to safety on a pair of custom-sized rollerblades. Since a similar plan had succeeded in moving a gun repository in Skagen, a town about 45 miles from Rubjerg Knude, the government gave the green light (and 5 million kroner, or about $743,000) to Pedersen.

Last week, Pedersen and his team mounted Rubjerg Knude on a pair of roller blades attached to a track, and scooted the structure about 263 feet inland. It wasn’t exactly a rip-roaring ride—they moved it 0.001 mph. At that rate, the entire operation took almost 50 hours.

As one can imagine, Pedersen was a bit tired after such an epic undertaking.

“It’s been overwhelming for him,” Visit Denmark’s Nina Grandjean Gleerup told Condé Nast Traveler. “I think he’s told Denmark ‘Don’t use me anymore’ because of all the attention!”

Gleerup also explained that Pedersen’s humble diligence and creativity reflected the spirit of the neighboring fishing towns, Løken and Lønstrup, which are known for quaint coffee shops, galleries, and beautiful natural landscapes.

Starting to think a lighthouse would make the perfect beachfront getaway? While Rubjerg Knude itself isn’t open for overnight visitors, there are plenty of other lighthouses near the sea—book a stay in one here.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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