Self-taught New York-based artist Hula (Sean Yoro) grabbed the Internet's attention earlier this year by painting portraits of women that are half-submerged in bodies of water. Unlike muralists who seek walls with high visibility for their work, Hula uses his paddleboard as a floating platform to reach sunken ships, walls, panels, and bridge supports to paint pieces that relate to the surf culture of his native Oahu, Hawaii. Recently, the artist decided to use his skill for hyperreal portraiture on a different water-based canvas: icebergs somewhere in North America.

On his website, Hula writes that for "legal safety," the locations of his pieces are often undisclosed. For this series of murals, he used mounted acrylic sheets and oil paints to create pieces that are designed not to last. "In the short time I was there, I witnessed the extreme melting rate first-hand as the sound of ice cracking was a constant background noise while painting," Hula says. "Within a few weeks these murals will be forever gone, but for those who find them, I hope they ignite a sense of urgency, as they represent the millions of people in need of our help who are already being affected from the rising sea levels of climate change.”

[h/t: StreetArtNews]

All images via StreetArtNews // Sean Yoro.