13 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Retail Store Employees

Getty
Getty

If you’ve ever wondered how you managed to spend twice as much as you planned, you may want to consider the shrewd retail employees you’re up against. Here's what we discovered talking to the men and women who ring you up.

1. THEY HAVE JEDI MIND TRICKS.

Retail employees—particularly when it comes to big-ticket items—are trained to steer conversations in ways that have you saying, “I have to have this.”

“You have to be a step ahead in the conversation,” says Larry, a former store supervisor at a northeast Best Buy. “It’s about getting them to admit what they want and controlling the answers you want out of them. It’s a big mind game.” Once you begin to nod your head and agree that a $500 sound system is a better value than the one marked for $1000—and if you came in wanting the $300 option, that's still a sales upgrade—their job is done. “But the second the customer takes over and leads you, you begin to lose the sale.”

2. NICE GETS THE BEST PRICE

Gone are the days when customers can haggle over prices for most goods—but that doesn’t mean everyone gets the same deal. Polite, mannered customers are “200 percent” more likely to walk out the door with a great deal than someone throwing a tantrum, Larry says. “It’s not that we can necessarily adjust prices, but in terms of getting a call when a sale is on, or someone going the extra mile, you get more bees with honey.”

3. … BUT RUDE SALESPEOPLE MIGHT HAVE YOU SPENDING MORE.

iStock

A recent study from the University of British Columbia revealed that shoppers looking at high-end items might actually be more likely to buy when staff play hard to get. Marketing Professor Darren Dahl discovered that rude or “snobby” salespeople made people want to share their exclusivity by purchasing luxury goods.

4. THEY HATE IN-LINE SHOPPERS.

“The indecisive customers are the worst,” says Kay, an employee for a major discount apparel chain. “[Like] still shopping while in line, and telling the cashier to add and remove stuff.” If you haven’t settled on your selection by the time you arrive at the register, expect to be put on the not-nice list.

5. SHOPPING AROUND 5 P.M. MIGHT BE A BAD IDEA.

While this can vary from store to store, the 5 to 6 p.m. window might be the worst time to try and get some real help. “This is during shift changes, which may result in closed tills and more part-time associates helping customers,” Kay says. “The full-timers may care more, as the job is more of a career.” Instead, try shopping closer to opening, when employees are heavily caffeinated.

6. THEY MIGHT PROFILE YOU.

iStock

Despite the fact that no retailer would ever recommend judging a customer based on appearance, salespeople do it anyway. “It happens,” Larry says. “You can rush to judgment, thinking because someone is wearing ratty clothes, all they want is a cable.” But that can backfire: Once, a customer stopped in to Larry’s Best Buy unshaven and covered in paint and filth. “He spent twenty grand. He was painting the room he was going to put his new television in.”

7. THEY KIND OF WANT YOU TO LEAVE A MESS.

While the image of the forlorn apparel employee picking up after the wreckage of a clothes-tossing crowd gets a lot of play, the reality is that stores need you to make a mess: Touching items is a key component of making the move from contemplation to purchase. Holding up that sweater—even if you discard it in a heap—is better than not touching it at all. (This is also why many apparel displays are on flat tables: They want you to put your stuff down so you have two hands to fondle that shirt.)

8. THERE MIGHT BE POO IN THE CHANGING ROOMS.

Many retail Redditors have expressed frustration at the apparent confusion some customers have regarding changing rooms and restrooms. Horror stories abound of salespeople entering clothing areas and finding fecal matter. Why do customers treat the rooms like bus stop stalls? “I cannot comprehend,” one worker said,” why anyone would want to do this.”

9. THE CLEARANCE AREA IS A PURPOSEFUL DISASTER.

If you’ve ever given up trying to make sense of the hurricane that is the clearance section, you’re doing exactly what they want. Stores often leave the clearance area in disarray in order to draw customers back to the neat, organized displays featuring current (and regularly priced) merchandise.

10. BRUSHING BUTTS IS BAD FOR BUSINESS.

In his examination of shopping habits, Why We Buy, retail advisor Paco Underhill observed that customers examining a display in a congested area of a store were likely to experience a “butt brush”—an unintentional collision of backsides as other customers squeezed through. After a couple of brushes, they’d move on without picking out an item, apparently discouraged by the physical contact. Stores that relocated the displays to avoid the scrapes saw sales go up.

11. THEY DON'T NECESSARILY WANT TO SELL YOU ON THE MOST EXPENSIVE THING.

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Depending on the deal the retailer has with a manufacturer, that $700 television might not net as much profit margin as a $600 television—so don’t be surprised if you get down-sold rather than up-sold. And don’t think a premium brand is necessarily in their sights. According to Larry, one major electronics manufacturer was so demanding about displays and inventory management that sales reps preferred not to even deal with their products. “There was almost no margin and we didn’t believe in the product,” he says. “You could get more for less.”

12. THEY MIGHT NOT USE COMMAS IN THEIR PRICES.

Looking at an expensive television or high-end outfit? It’s likely to be priced at $1999 rather than $1,999 because the latter would take longer to say. Researchers have discovered that more syllables in a price tag means a customer may see it as being more expensive—even if it’s simply printed differently.

13. IT’S EASIER IF YOU JUST LET THEM TALK.

Customers, Larry says, are frequently impatient and just want salespeople to get through their canned pleas for store credit, product demos, or add-ons. The problem: They’re not doing it because they like hearing themselves talk. “Someone in the store told them they had to. It’s going to happen one way or another, so if you just listen, it’ll go faster.” If you’re in a weekend rush, well, join the club. “In the end, they don’t want to be there selling a television at 7:30 on a Saturday, either.”

Additional Sources:
Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping.

The 10 Best Memorial Day 2020 Sales

iRobot,GoWise,Funko via Wayfair, Entertainment Earth
iRobot,GoWise,Funko via Wayfair, Entertainment Earth

The Memorial Day sales have started early this year, and it's easy to find yourself drowning in offers for cheap mattresses, appliances, shoes, and grills. To help you cut through the noise and focus on the best deals around, we threw together some of our favorite Memorial Day sales going on right now. Take a look below.

1. Leesa

A Leesa Hybrid mattress.
A Leesa Hybrid mattress.
Leesa

Through May 31, you can save up to $400 on every mattress model Leesa has to offer, from the value-minded Studio by Leesa design to the premium Leesa Legend, which touts a combination of memory foam and micro-coil springs to keep you comfortable in any position you sleep in.

Find it: Leesa

2. Sur La Table

This one is labeled as simply a “summer sale,” but the deals are good only through Memorial Day, so you should get to it quickly. This sale takes up to 20 percent off outdoor grilling and dining essentials, like cast-iron shrimp pans ($32), a stainless steel burger-grilling basket ($16), and, of course, your choice of barbeque sauce to go along with it.

Find it: Sur la Table

3. Wayfair

KitchenAid Stand Mixer on Sale on Wayfair.
Wayfair/KitchenAid

Wayfair is cutting prices on all manner of appliances until May 28. Though you can pretty much find any home appliance imaginable at a low price, the sale is highlighted by $130 off a KitchenAid stand mixer and 62 percent off this eight-in-one GoWise air fryer.

And that’s only part of the brand’s multiple Memorial Day sales, which you can browse here. They’re also taking up to 40 percent off Samsung refrigerators and washing machines, up to 65 percent off living room furniture, and up to 60 percent off mattresses.

Find it: Wayfair

4. Blue Apron

If you sign up for a Blue Apron subscription before May 26, you’ll save $20 on each of your first three box deliveries, totaling $60 in savings. 

Find it: Blue Apron

5. The PBS Store

Score 20 percent off sitewide at Shop.PBS.org when you use the promo code TAKE20. This slashes prices on everything from documentaries like Ken Burns’s The Roosevelt: An Intimate History ($48) and The Civil War ($64) to a Pride & Prejudice tote bag ($27) and this precious heat-changing King Henry VIII mug ($11) that reveals the fates of his many wives when you pour your morning coffee.

Find it: The PBS Store

6. Amazon

eufy robot vacuum.
Amazon/eufy

While Amazon doesn’t have an official Memorial Day sale, the ecommerce giant still has plenty of ever-changing deals to pick from. Right now, you can take $100 off this outdoor grill from Weber, $70 off a eufy robot vacuum, and 22 percent off the ASUS gaming laptop. For more deals, just go to Amazon and have a look around.

7. Backcountry

You can save up to 50 percent on tents, hiking packs, outdoor wear, and more from brands like Patagonia, Marmot, and others during Backcountry's Memorial Day sale.

Find it: Backcountry

8. Entertainment Earth

Funko Pops on Sale on Entertainment Earth.
Entertainment Earth/Funko

From now until June 2, Entertainment Earth is having a buy one, get one half off sale on select Funko Pops. This includes stalwarts like the Star Wars and Batman lines, and more recent additions like the Schitt's Creek Funkos and the pre-orders for the upcoming X-Men movie line.

Find it: Entertainment Earth

9. Moosejaw

With the promo code SUNSCREEN, you can take 20 percent off one full-price item at Moosejaw, along with finding up to 30 percent off select items during the outdoor brand's summer sale. These deals include casual clothing, outdoor wear, trail sneakers, and more. 

Find it: Moosejaw

10. Osprey

Through May 25, you can save 25 percent on select summer items, and 40 percent off products from last season. This can include anything from hiking packs and luggage to outdoorsy socks and hats. So if you're planning on getting acquainted with the great outdoors this summer, now you can do it on the cheap.

Find it: Osprey

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

12 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Easter Bunnies

This child clearly can't get enough Easter Bunny in her life.
This child clearly can't get enough Easter Bunny in her life.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Every year, thousands of families, church groups, and event planners enlist entertainment companies to dispatch a costumed bunny for their Easter celebrations. These performers often endure oppressive heat, frightened children, and other indignities to bring joy to the season.

It can be a thankless job, which is why Mental Floss approached several hares and their handlers for some insight into what makes for a successful appearance, the numerous occupational hazards, and why they can be harassed while holding a giant carrot. Here’s a glimpse of what goes on under the ears.

1. They might be watching netflix under the mask.

Has a bunny ever seemed slow to respond to your child? He or she might be in the middle of a binge-watch. Jennifer Ellison, the sales and marketing manager for San Diego Kids’ Party Rentals and a bunny wrangler during the Easter season, says that extended party engagements might lead their furry foot soldiers to seek distractions while in costume. “We book the bunny by the hour and he is often booked for multiple hour blocks,” she says. “Listening to music definitely helps the time pass.” One of her bunny friends who does a lot of shopping mall appearances has even rigged up a harness that can cradle a smart phone. “It sits above the bunny's nose, resting right at eye level for the performer inside, easily allowing the performer to stream Netflix, scroll through Facebook, or check emails.”

2. They can’t walk on wet grass.

Bunnies that appear at private functions, like backyard parties or egg hunts, have to maintain the illusion of being a character and not a human in a furry costume. According to Albert Joseph, the owner of Albert Joseph Entertainment in San Francisco and a 30-year veteran of Easter engagements, one of the cardinal rules is never to set foot on wet grass. Why? “They wear regular shoes under their giant bunny feet,” he says. “If they step on wet grass and then walk on cement, they’ll make a human foot print, not a bunny print.”

3. There’s a reason they might not pick up your kid.

Bunnies might be amenable to posing for a photo with your child on their lap, but they’re probably not going to grab the little tyke and sweep them off their feet. According to Steve Rothenberg, a veteran performer and owner of Talk of the Town Entertainment in Rockville, Maryland, deadlifting a kid is against the rules. “The last thing you want is to lift them up and have them knock off your head,” he says.

4. Giant carrots will invite inappropriate behavior.

A person dressed as the Easter bunny.
As the 3-foot-long carrot proves, adults are easily the least mature guests at a child's Easter party.
lisafx/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Joseph’s warren of party bunnies usually come equipped with a 3-foot-long giant carrot as a prop. While children are amused by the oversized vegetable, the adults at the parties usually can’t help making observations. “Practically every visit, there’s always someone saying, ‘My, what a big carrot you have,’” he says.

On one occasion, Joseph attended a function at a retirement home. One of the women, who he estimated to be in her 80s, commented on his big feet in a lascivious manner. “She told me she was in room 37.”

5. Clothes make the bunny.

Easter bunny at the White House.
Every year, a well-dressed Easter bunny visits Washington, D.C. for the annual White House Easter Egg Roll.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

While “naked” (i.e., unclothed) bunnies remain popular, Ellison’s lineup also includes Mr. Bunny, a “classy lad with a top hat and vest,” and a Mrs. Bunny sporting a purple dress. Why would kids care if a bunny has sartorial sense? “Kids can probably better relate to a giant, furry character if it's dressed like a human,” Ellison says. “[And] we just thought the costumes looked cute.”

6. They can’t wear dark clothing underneath.

If a bunny wants to wear a black shirt under his or her fur, it stands to reason there wouldn’t be any issue: It's all hidden from sight. But Joseph insists that his cast stick with white apparel only. In addition to being cooler, it serves a practical function. “There’s always an opportunity to see a little something around the neckline or near the feet,” he says. Light clothing helps preserve the character.

7. They use an upholstery cleaner for their heads.

Most bunny costumes can be tossed in any regular washing machine, with the feet going in a larger commercial-use unit. But the heads, which are typically massive and unwieldy, get special attention. “You know those upholstery cleaners you can rent from a grocery store?” Joseph asks. “We use those. There’s a wand attachment to it for cleaning carpet.”

8. There’s a trick to keeping cool.

Costumes made of fake fur in the spring can be a recipe for disaster—or at least some lightheadedness. While none of the bunnies we profiled had experienced fainting spells, Ellison says that the trick to staying cool is actually adding a layer underneath the outfit. “Light, breathable clothing underneath the suit usually does the trick, but some people choose to wear an ice vest under the suit as well.”

Many bunnies also work in intervals: 45 to 50 minutes “on,” and 10 to 15 minutes in a private area to cool off and drink water. “Clients are usually understanding and sympathetic of the bunny and will allow even more breaks if necessary,” Ellison says.

9. Mints are essential.

Bunnies may favor carrots and grass, but their human operators need something other than that in order to deal with the humidity. Rothenberg says that his bunnies usually nibble on mints while working a crowd. “They’ll typically chew gum or have some kind of mint to keep their throat from drying out,” he says.

10. They use bunny handlers to prevent knockdowns.

A person dressed as the Easter bunny.
An Easter Bunny makes a young girl's day.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Any professional bunny knows that having an assistant watching their back is the best way to ensure an appearance goes smoothly. “Your vision is limited and you can’t really look to the left or right,” Rothenberg says. “Having an assistant prevents kids from running up behind you.”

11. They have damaged butts.

In order to ease apprehensive kids, Joseph advocates for his bunnies to squat near a child rather than bend over. “It gets them at a child’s level so they can touch and feel for themselves,” he says. “But a bunny that does a lot of squatting winds up needing their [costume] butts re-sewn. I’ve repaired a lot of them.” Joseph will also invite mothers to sit on the bunny’s lap so fearful children are more likely to approach. “You don’t want to prod the kid,” he says.

12. They’re not just for easter.

While bunny costume season is a fleeting few weeks, companies are happy to roll out their rabbits for other occasions. Once, Ellison sent out a bunny for a customer’s Alice in Wonderland-themed gathering. “The client wanted the White Rabbit, so we dressed up our bunny in a vest and top hat and gave him an over-sized pocket watch. It worked out great.”

This piece originally ran in 2017.