The Fleeting Fame of the New Year’s Baby

HannamariaH/iStock via Getty Images
HannamariaH/iStock via Getty Images

Being born on New Year's Day can bring you fame and a little bit of luck—that is, if you’re first and at the right hospital.

It’s not clear precisely when newspapers and television broadcasts began announcing the arrival of the year’s first babies. But the image of a baby representing a fresh start dates back to ancient Greece. Each year, Greeks celebrated the rebirth of Dionysus, the god of fertility and wine. Part of the festivities included placing a baby in a basket and parading the infant through town.

While there are fewer (if any) baby parades now, there’s still a ton of emphasis on the tiny face of a new year. Between 1906 and 1943, The Saturday Evening Post featured its own rendition of the New Year baby on every first-of-the-year issue. And classic films like Rudolph’s Shiny New Year reinforced the tiny icon’s popularity while showing just how hard New Year babies have it (hint: they get a lot of attention).

So, it’s no wonder that being the first baby born in a given year is a pretty big deal. And maybe that’s why some New Year’s babies have scored prizes, scholarships, and free meals for their parents. While it’s not a universal rule that the first baby born on January 1 gets gifts, it’s been a common marketing tool for businesses to donate prizes to the newly birthed for decades.

Take Bonnie Lee Little from Cambridge, Massachusetts, who won a bundle of gifts for being born right after midnight on January 1, 1960. But not all those gifts were for her. Along with gift certificates to local stores, a crib mattress, and a comb and brush set, Little’s parents also received “two deluxe dinners” at a nearby Italian restaurant, 14 dozen doughnuts, and $10. In 2007, Toys "R" Us held a "First Baby of the Year Sweepstakes" in the U.S. with a $25,000 savings bond prize. Diapers.com gave away a year’s worth of free diapers to the first baby of 2015 born in New York City, along with a free cab ride home. Car seats, strollers, and gift cards are also common gifts. In some regions, hospitals will release New Year babies with gift baskets or certificates for things they’ll need during their 12-month reign as New Year's royalty.

But those gifts are tame compared to the pandemonium of potentially having a globally famous millennium baby. In 1999, a British TV show Birthrace 2000 featured families looking to bring home the first baby of the new century. Some baby stores even sold $50 “Millennium Conception Kits” to help couples aim for the perfect date (March 25 through April 1, 1999 was considered the prime window for conceiving a millennium New Year baby).

So, what about babies that just miss the midnight delivery? There’s still a prize for parents in the form of a tax deduction for the year. While the 2000 New Year's baby competition seemed intense, some doctors say their patients aren’t overly concerned with precisely meeting the midnight deadline because there’s no exact way to know if a baby is truly first. Larger cities with multiple hospitals often have several New Year's babies with no clear winner, and it's nearly impossible to determine a national first baby. But, that doesn’t mean being a New Year's newborn is normal—the odds of having a baby within the first minute of the ball drop is close to that of being struck by lightning.

As for babies born first in coming years, they could be a little less famous. Many hospitals are nixing the New Year's publicity as a safety precaution against increasing child abductions. Instead, some families have to contact news stations on their own. But that doesn’t mean the New Year's birth tradition isn’t something to strive for—babies born on the first day of the year supposedly have the best luck throughout their long lives.

Party Like a Hobbit at Chicago’s Lord of the Rings Pop-Up Bar

Gollum and a Ringwraith loom near Bilbo's hobbit hole at Replay Lincoln Park's Lord of the Rings pop-up bar.
Gollum and a Ringwraith loom near Bilbo's hobbit hole at Replay Lincoln Park's Lord of the Rings pop-up bar.
Replay Lincoln Park

One does not simply walk into Mordor, but one does simply walk into The Lord of the Rings pop-up bar in Chicago—as long as you’re at least 21 years old, of course.

Replay Lincoln Park, known for elaborate themed pop-ups for Game of Thrones, South Park, and other entertainment franchises, has transformed its premises into a magical reproduction of Middle-earth aptly called “The One Pop-Up to Rule Them All,” open now through March 23.

Inside, you’ll be able to crouch under an outcropping of tangled tree roots while one of the dreaded Nazgûl lurks above you, high-five a grimacing Gollum, and snap photos with all your favorite Lord of the Rings characters.

nazgul at the lord of the rings pop-up bar at chicago's replay lincoln park
The Nazgûl like to party, too.
Replay Lincoln Park

You might want to skip elevenses to make sure you have plenty of room for a Hobbit-approved feast during your visit. The menu, catered by Zizi’s Cafe, features items like Fried Po-tay-toes, Lord of the Wings, Beef Lembas, and Pippen’s Popcorn.

ent replica at chicago's replay lincoln park pop-up bar
Say hello to a friendly Ent while you munch on "Pippen's Popcorn."
Replay Lincoln Park

According to Thrillist, there will be three different counters in the bar, each with its own specialty drinks. Head to The Prancing Pony for a second breakfast shot (maple whiskey, bacon, and orange juice), or take a trip to Minas Tirith to toss back a palantir shot, made of silver tequila and passion fruit purée. If you’re in the mood for a little dark magic, you can trek over to Mordor and try a “my precious” shot, a fusion of dark rum, orange liquor, and Cajun seasoning.

lord of the rings pop-up bar at chicago's replay lincoln park
The Eye of Sauron is watching you order another round of Mordor shots.
Replay Lincoln Park

For those of you who are happy to accompany your Tolkien-obsessed friends to the pop-up but aren’t exactly tickled at the sight of a moss-covered Ent replica yourselves, take heart in this added bonus: Replay Lincoln Park also boasts more than 60 free arcade games and pinball machines.

[h/t Thrillist]

95 Years of The New Yorker Covers Visualized by Color

Screenshot via C82
Screenshot via C82

On February 21, 1925, The New Yorker appeared on the magazine scene with a cover illustration of a dandy drawn by art editor Rea Irvin, a character later christened Eustace Tilley. Almost a century later, Tilley still graces the cover of The New Yorker at least once a year on the magazine’s anniversary. Other weeks, they commission artists to illustrate timely political topics and evergreen moods.

The magazine has run more than 4600 covers in its 92 years of near-weekly issues (it’s currently published 47 times a year), all of which you can explore by color, thanks to designer Nicholas Rougeux (who has previously visualized sentences and punctuation in classic literature).


Using an algorithm, Rougeux analyzed the top five colors represented in every cover illustration and created a color palette for that issue. Then, he mapped out a palette for every single cover, creating a timeline of New Yorker design. It allows you to see what colors have dominated particular years and decades. If you scroll over the individual palettes, you can see the full image of that week’s cover.


Rougeux found some trends in the colors that have repeatedly graced the magazine’s cover. “Limited and muted palettes were used the 1920s," he writes on his site, while "possibly due to printing limitations, darker greens were more common in the 1940s, lighter palettes were used in the 1970s and 1980s, louder contrasting palettes were popular in the 1990s and more well-rounded palettes started being used since the 2000s.”

You can explore the color timeline for yourself here.

All images courtesy Nicholas Rougeux

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