Artist Adds Pop Culture Figures to Thrift Store Paintings

david irvine
david irvine

Artist David Irvine of the Gnarled Branch makes all kinds of of interesting artwork, like painted upcycled vinyl records, sculpture, and even puppetry. He also finds old thrift store paintings and adds his own unique touch to the landscapes. These remixed paintings feature pop culture characters, animals, and creatures you've seen before—just not like this.

The project started years ago when Irvine was a struggling artist. He would frequent thrift stores for old, discarded paintings he could use for art supplies. He would reuse old frames and paint over canvases that would otherwise be thrown away. Irvine first got the idea to use the pre-existing art after finding a particular landscape on one of his trips. 

"One piece I came across at a yard sale was a seascape and for some reason I had a vision of two reapers standing on the shore playing with a beach ball," he explained in an e-mail. "I painted in this vision and posted it online where it sold immediately and generated a big response—I knew at that moment I had to start a series of redirected paintings along with the other types of artwork that I do."

Irvine is careful to respect the original art and artist (as much as one can when repurposing a piece), and never paints over signatures. He explains: 

Over 90% of the work I redirect are prints on board or heavy paper with the remainder being originals on canvas or anonymous paint by numbers. I take great care in touching up any damage from sun bleaching, scratches or buffs, before I add in any of my own ideas. I also do research on each work before I begin paint, to make sure it's not a valued work. Most are generally mass produced and have little historical or monetary value. In many of my redirected works I try to emulate the original by use of similar brush work, coloring and rendering style.

He also tries to avoid cleaner, nicer pieces that might still be being purchased and enjoyed. Instead, Irvine looks for worn and broken artwork that he can breathe new life into. You can check out more of his work on Facebook and Etsy

All images courtesy of David Irvine.

Amazon's Best Cyber Monday Deals on Tablets, Wireless Headphones, Kitchen Appliances, and More

Amazon
Amazon

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Cyber Monday has arrived, and with it comes some amazing deals. This sale is the one to watch if you are looking to get low prices on the latest Echo Dot, Fire Tablet, video games, Instant Pots, or 4K TVs. Even if you already took advantage of sales during Black Friday or Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday still has plenty to offer, especially on Amazon. We've compiled some the best deals out there on tech, computers, and kitchen appliances so you don't have to waste your time browsing.

Computers and tablets

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Video Games

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TECH, GADGETS, AND TVS

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- Amazon Fire TV Stick; $30 (save $20)

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home and Kitchen

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New Online Art Exhibition Needs the Public’s Help to Track Down Lost Masterpieces by Van Gogh, Monet, and More

Vincent van Gogh's original Portrait of Dr. Gachet wasn't stolen, but it hasn't been seen in 30 years.
Vincent van Gogh's original Portrait of Dr. Gachet wasn't stolen, but it hasn't been seen in 30 years.
Vincent van Gogh, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

If you wanted to compare both versions of Vincent van Gogh’s Portrait of Dr. Gachet in person, you couldn’t. While the second one currently hangs in Paris’s Musée d'Orsay, the public hasn’t seen the original painting since 1990. In fact, nobody’s really sure where it is—after its owner Ryoei Saito died in 1996, the precious item passed from private collector to private collector, but the identity of its current owner is shrouded in mystery.

As Smithsonian Magazine reports, Portrait of Dr. Gachet (1890) is one of a dozen paintings in “Missing Masterpieces,” a digital exhibit of some of the world’s most famous lost artworks. It’s not the only Van Gogh in the collection. His 1884 painting The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring was snatched from the Netherlands’ Singer Laren museum earlier this year; and his 1888 painting The Painter on His Way to Work has been missing since World War II. Other works include View of Auvers-sur-Oise by Paul Cézanne, William Blake’s Last Judgement, and two bridge paintings by Claude Monet.

Paul Cézanne's View of Auvers-sur-Oise was stolen from the University of Oxford's art museum on New Year's Eve in 1999.Ashmolean Museum, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The new online exhibit is a collaboration between Samsung and art crime expert Noah Charney, who founded The Association for Research into Crimes Against Art. It isn’t just a page where art enthusiasts can explore the stories behind the missing works—it’s also a way to encourage people to come forward with information that could lead to the recovery of the works themselves.

“From contradictory media reports to speculation in Reddit feeds—the clues are out there, but the volume of information can be overwhelming,” Charney said in a press release. “This is where technology and social media can help by bringing people together to assist the search. It’s not unheard of for an innocuous tip posted online to be the key that unlocks a case.”

The exhibition will be online through February 10, 2021, and citizen sleuths can email their tips to missingmasterpieces@artcrimeresearch.org.

[h/t Smithsonian Magazine]