15 Things You Didn't Know About Madeleine Albright

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Getty

Perhaps Madeleine Albright, the first woman to serve as the U.S. Secretary of State, best described her historic appointment in her 2003 memoir, Madam Secretary: “It was almost…inconceivable that someone who had not held a government job until she was thirty-nine years old and the mother of three would become the highest-ranking woman in American history. Well into adulthood, I was never supposed to be what I became."

Her impressive credentials include professor, ambassador, New York Times best-selling author and current chairperson of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs as well as the chair of the Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy business. Famously known for saying, “There is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women,” the perseverance she has demonstrated throughout her career is inspiring for anyone, man or woman. In honor of her 79th birthday, here are a few things you should know about Albright and her unconventional path to U.S. politics.

1. “MADELEINE” ISN’T HER ORIGINAL NAME.

Marie Jana was born in Prague on May 15, 1937, to Anna Spieglová and Josef Korbel. But the name “Marie” didn’t stick for long; various family members called her Madla, Madlen, or Madlenka throughout her youth. When Albright began to study French, she decided she liked that language’s version of her nickname: Madeleine. Still, Albright never legally changed her name and is officially Marie Jana.

2. HER FAMILY FLED TO ESCAPE THE NAZIS.

Her father’s role at Czechoslovakia’s Belgrade embassy and deep respect for democracy put his family’s safety in question when the Nazis invaded. As her parents arranged for the family to go to London, Albright lived with her grandmother in the country. Her mother wrote of that time, “With all the possible and impossible planning and with the help of some good friends and lots of luck and little bribes the last plan worked...” Albright and her family left for England 10 days after the Nazis invaded the capital.

3. SHE APPEARED IN A FILM ABOUT REFUGEES.

While in England, Albright was selected to appear in a movie about the war’s refugee children, and was given a stuffed animal as payment for her starring role.

4. THE FAMILY’S RETURN TO CZECHOSLOVAKIA WAS BRIEF.


Albright (who speaks fluent Czech) would return to Czechoslovakia many times as an adult, including in October 2003, when she traveled there to launch her autobiography. Image credit: David Nekk/ AFP/ Getty Images

Though her family was grateful to return to their home country after the war, they weren’t there for long. A series of ominous political moves found the Communist party taking over Czechoslovakia, forcing Albright’s family to once again flee for their safety. Albright, along with her mother and two siblings, arrived in the U.S. aboard the SS America on November 11, 1948.

5. HER FAMILY BEGAN A NEW LIFE IN DENVER.

After her father arrived stateside, the family lived on Long Island while waiting to be granted political asylum. Once Josef secured a teaching position at the University of Denver and the family was settled in their new city, Albright began attending Kent Denver School and founded the school’s international relations club. (She wasn’t the only secretary of state who benefited from her father’s teachings on diplomacy and international affairs; years later, he taught Condoleezza Rice as a student.)

6. HER COLLEGE YEARS WERE MARKED WITH MAJOR MILESTONES.

Albright studied Political Science at Wellesley College, graduating with honors in 1959. In the years prior to graduation, she became a naturalized citizen (in 1957), and met her future husband, Joseph Medill Patterson Albright, during a summer internship at the Denver Post. In her 2009 book Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box, Albright says it was tradition for Wellesley women to get married on graduation day. Despite this, she waited three days after receiving her diploma to marry Joseph.

7. SHE WAS ON THE MOVE THROUGH THE 1960S.

The Albrights moved several times for Joseph’s career. By 1961 the couple had already lived in Rolla, Missouri and Chicago before moving to Long Island, where their twins, Alice and Anne, were born. In 1962 the family moved to Georgetown, where Madeleine studied Russian and International Relations at a division of Johns Hopkins University. When they moved back to Long Island in 1963, Albright continued her studies at Columbia University and earned a certificate in Russian and an M.A. in 1968, and a Ph.D. in 1976. Her third daughter, Katharine, was born in 1967.

8. MOVING BACK TO D.C. SPARKED HER POLITICAL CAREER.

Albright became more involved with politics when her family moved back to D.C. in 1968. From 1976 to 1978, she served as Senator Edmund S. Muskie’s chief legislative assistant. And in 1978, Zbigniew Brzezinski, one of her professors from Columbia and then National Security Advisor to President Jimmy Carter, chose Madeleine as Brzezinski’s liaison to Congress.

9. SHE FOLLOWED IN HER FATHER’S FOOTSTEPS TOWARD ACADEMIA.

After her 22-year marriage ended in divorce in 1982, Albright joined Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service as a research professor of International Affairs, where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses. She also served as director of the Women in Foreign Service program.

10. BEING A U.N. AMBASSADOR CHALLENGED HER TO SPEAK UP AND MAKE DIFFICULT CALLS.


U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Albright voted in favor of a UN resolution on August 10, 1995.
Image credit: JON LEVY/AFP/Getty Images.

Albright’s work in international affairs led to her working as foreign policy adviser to both Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 and Michael Dukakis in 1988, but she was unable to work for Clinton’s 1992 bid. Despite this, after Clinton won, he nominated Albright to be the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. Though she was often one of the few women in the room (and many times, the only one), she did not sit silently; she realized that if she only observed and listened, she wouldn’t get a chance to speak, which meant the voice of the United States wouldn’t be heard.

11. HER ROLE AS SECRETARY OF STATE MADE HISTORY.


As President Bill Clinton looked on, Albright was sworn in as the new US Secretary of State in January 1997.
Image Credit: Joyce Naltchayan/ AFP/ Getty Images)

On December 5, 1996, President Clinton nominated Albright to be the 64th Secretary of State. She was unanimously confirmed by the Senate and sworn in on January 23, 1997. Albright wrote of the experience that Clinton “… gave me the opportunity that no other individual, male or female, has had to serve full terms both as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and as U.S. Secretary of State.” At the time of her appointment, Albright was the highest-ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government.

12. HER TRIP TO NORTH KOREA WAS A FIRST FOR U.S. GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS.


US Secretary of State Albright met with North Korean Leader Kim Jong Il (right) on October 23, 2000.
Image credit: David Guttenfelder/ AFP/ Getty Images.

In October 2000, Albright made a diplomatic visit to North Korea to meet with the country’s leader, Kim Jong Il. Her trip marked the first time an American secretary of state—and the highest level official ever—had visited the country.

13. SHE LEARNED ABOUT HER JEWISH ANCESTRY IN AN UNEXPECTED WAY.

Albright was raised Catholic after her parents converted in 1941, though she was unaware of any previous religious affiliations. (She later converted to Episcopalianism.) During her vetting process for secretary of state, she mentioned that she might have Jewish ancestors. During his research on a profile about Albright, Michael Dobbs, a Washington Post reporter, discovered that three of her grandparents died in Auschwitz and Terezin. Her family conducted further research and learned that 25 members of her family died in concentration camps.

14. HER SENSE OF HUMOR HAS BROADENED OVER TIME.

Albright has said that she tended to be a little too serious as a child. Young Madeleine would be happy to learn that as an adult, she has developed quite a sense of humor. She once engaged in a humorous Twitter war with Conan O’Brien and has appeared in popular TV shows as herself, including Parks and Recreation and Gilmore Girls.

15. HER CREATIVE JEWELRY SELECTIONS GARNERED INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION.


On September 29, 2009, Albright visited the New York City exhibition, "Read My Pins: The Madeline Albright Collection,"
which featured over 200 of her pins and their stories. Image Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Albright is famously known for wearing pins that express her thoughts on the diplomatic proceedings she attends. After she was compared to a serpent by the Iraqi media, Albright chose to wear a large snake pin for her next meeting on the country. The jewelry quickly became one of Albright’s trademarks. Though she is fond of all the pieces in her collection (she says her favorite is a heart made by her youngest daughter), one of them nearly betrayed her. On the day of her swearing-in ceremony for Secretary of State, her newly acquired eagle pin nearly fell off while she took her oath.

6 Protective Mask Bundles You Can Get On Sale

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pinkomelet/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Daily life has changed immeasurably since the onset of COVID-19, and one of the ways people have had to adjust is by wearing protective masks out in public places, including in parks and supermarkets. These are an essential part of fighting the spread of the virus, and there are plenty of options for you depending on what you need, whether your situation calls for disposable masks to run quick errands or the more long-lasting KN95 model if you're going to work. Check out some options you can pick up on sale right now.

1. Cotton Face Masks; $20 for 4

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This four-pack of washable cotton face masks comes in tie-dye, kids patterns, and even a series of mustache patterns, so you can do your part to mask germs without also covering your personality.

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2. CE- and FDA-Approved KN95 Mask; $50 for 10

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You’ve likely heard about the N95 face mask and its important role in keeping frontline workers safe. Now, you can get a similar model for yourself. The KN95 has a dual particle layer, which can protect you from 99 percent of particles in the air and those around you from 70 percent of the particles you exhale. Nose clips and ear straps provide security and comfort, giving you some much-needed peace of mind.

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3. Three-Ply Masks; $13 for 10

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These three-ply, non-medical, non-woven face masks provide a moisture-proof layer against your face with strong filtering to keep you and everyone around you safe. The middle layer filters non-oily particles in the air and the outer layer works to block visible objects, like droplets.

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4. Disposable masks; $44 for 50

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If the thought of reusing the same mask from one outing to the next makes you feel uneasy, there’s a disposable option that doesn’t compromise quality; in fact, it uses the same three-layered and non-woven protection as other masks to keep you safe from airborne particles. Each mask in this pack of 50 can be worn safely for up to 10 hours. Once you're done, safely dispose of it and start your next outing with a new one.

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You're going to need to have a stash of masks on hand for the foreseeable future, so it's a good idea to protect the ones you’ve got. This face mask protector case is waterproof and dust-proof to preserve your mask as long as possible.

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16 Priceless Treasures We've Lost Forever

jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Steven Spielberg is known for crafting such masterpieces as Jaws, E.T., Schindler's List, and Jurassic Park. With such a long and acclaimed film career, it probably wouldn't surprise anyone to learn that Spielberg got his start behind the camera at just 17 years old when (with the help of his friends and his high school marching band) he directed his first feature-length film, Firelight.

What's that? You've never seen Firelight? Well, you're certainly not alone; sadly, just under four minutes of the original footage remains. After screening Firelight for around 500 people, the young director sent a few of the film reels off to a producer for review. When the budding director later went back to retrieve his film, he discovered that the producer had been fired—and his movie had vanished.

Firelight is just one example of the many priceless items that have disappeared from history. On this episode of The List Show, we're rediscovering all sort of treasures—from writing by Ernest Hemingway to natural landmarks—that have been lost to time (or circumstance). You can watch the full episode below.

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