50 Tools Every Homeowner Should Have

iStock
iStock

Congratulations: You bought a house! While it’s tempting to immediately splurge on furniture, there’s one purchase you should make before shelling out the money for a new sofa: a very large toolbox (or, if you have the room in your backyard, a storage shed).

The infographic below was created by home tool review website Power Drill Reviews. It lists the 50 pieces of equipment you’ll need to complete basic household repairs and keep your lawn in tip-top shape.

If that number sounds intimidating, just remember that it’s OK to start small. While it’s nice to own fancy gadgets like a caulking gun or an outlet tester, you’ll likely only need basics like a hammer, a screwdriver set, a measuring tape, and a saw as you’re first settling into your abode. Later on, you can spring for larger, costlier items. Plus, if you live in a condo or apartment, you won’t need things like a wheelbarrow or a garden hose at all. 

[h/t The Huffington Post]

The 20 Best States to Retire in 2020

Robert Clay Reed/iStock via Getty Images
Robert Clay Reed/iStock via Getty Images

Spending your workdays dreaming of retirement? It’s the ultimate goal of any longtime office-dweller, but figuring out when you’re ready to finally take the plunge is one of many questions aspiring retirees need to ask themselves before quitting the 9-to-5 grind for good. Determining where to retire is equally important, as you’ll need to think not just about affordability, but quality of life and health care as well.

Personal finance website WalletHub crunched the numbers on all 50 states to come up with an official ranking on the best (and worst) states to retire. Their experts looked at 47 different factors and enlisted the help of a panel of experts.

Ultimately, it turns out that the idea of retiring to Florida is still very much alive. The Sunshine State took the top spot in the poll, largely because of its affordability (it came in second in that category overall, with only Alabama besting it). But spending your golden years on a beach somewhere doesn’t seem to be for everyone; while Colorado and New Hampshire certainly have their warm-weather seasons, they also accumulate plenty of snow each year—which didn’t seem to matter as they clinched the second and third positions on the list, respectively. Here are the 20 best states to retire:

  1. Florida
  2. Colorado
  3. New Hampshire
  4. Utah
  5. Wyoming
  6. Delaware
  7. Virginia
  8. Wisconsin
  9. Idaho
  10. Iowa
  11. South Dakota
  12. Montana
  13. Pennsylvania
  14. Massachusetts
  15. Ohio
  16. Minnesota
  17. Texas
  18. South Carolina
  19. North Dakota
  20. Missouri

The news was far less happy for Kentucky, which claimed the last spot on the list (followed closely by New Mexico, Rhode Island, New Jersey, and West Virginia).

You can view an interactive version of the map below, and visit WalletHub to see more detailed information on each state’s ranking.

Source: WalletHub

Handy Chart Tells You When It's Too Cold to Walk Your Dog

iStock
iStock

Dogs have built-in fur coats, but they still get cold during their winter walks. Even if Fido isn’t hiding whenever you pull out the leash, you should still determine your dog’s tolerance for snowy romps, judging from this infographic spotted by Lifehacker, which is based on factors like size and breed (and not just enthusiasm for eating snow).

Infographic of the Tufts Animal Condition and Care (TACC) system, created by  Dr. Kim Smyth, a staff veterinarian with pet insurance company Petplan,
Petplan

Created by Dr. Kim Smyth, a staff veterinarian with pet insurance company Petplan, the chart is modeled after a scale developed by Tufts University that determines how canines respond to weather conditions depending on their builds. Before taking your four-legged friend outside, always check the temperature first (including wind chill), then reference the chart to gauge whether your dog can safely withstand the elements.

Small- to medium-sized dogs face cold-weather risks like hypothermia and frostbite when temperatures dip to 40°F. Larger dogs can tough it out for a little longer, but all pet owners should exercise caution and keep walks brief once the thermometer reaches 30°F. Canine accessories like sweaters or booties can safely prolong emergency bathroom strolls. Tiny pet shoes also protect vulnerable paws from sidewalk chemicals like antifreeze, according to NPR.

That said, no two canines—nor their fluff—are exactly alike. Dogs who are conditioned for the cold, or ones with heavy coats, fare better than older dogs or those with health conditions. Tiny, short-haired dogs may struggle too. Shivering is the first sign of hypothermia, Smyth told WBUR in an interview, so if you see your pups trembling, "you want to get these dogs inside, wrap them up in a warm towel or blanket, and get them to the vet if you need to," she says.

[h/t Lifehacker]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER