8 Vintage Hairstyling Products Your Grandmother Probably Swore By

“Natural” beauty has become a lot less time-consuming (and painful) thanks to technology. Women can easily shampoo, dry, and style their hair; those with straight hair can achieve curls in a matter of minutes. That’s not how it used to be—some of us remember when slumber parties were spent setting our hair in rollers or pin curls while simultaneously playing Truth or Dare. If you’re a Baby Boomer or a bit beyond, these products may bring back some not-so-fond memories.

1. DIPPITY-DO

 
Dippity-do was something of a prehistoric styling gel: It wasn’t as lightweight as the current products, and it didn’t contain today’s trendy ingredients like aloe and wheat protein. The original variety had the consistency of Jell-O and was designed to hold a set longer (when used with hair rollers) or to plaster bangs and fly-away hairs in place. (As a teen, KISS drummer Eric Carr slathered his hair with the stuff nightly and slept with a nylon stocking over his scalp in an effort to tame his natural curls into a Beatle-esque mop top.) Dippity-do could even be used on dry hair to set it in between shampoos—for some reason, beauty advice columns of the 1960s vehemently admonished ladies against washing their hair more than once per week.

2. CRÈME RINSE

 

Some older folks use the terms “conditioner” and “crème rinse” interchangeably, just like grandma used to do with “ice box” and “refrigerator,” but there is a difference between the two products. Crème rinse is much thinner in consistency because it doesn’t contain the emollients and sunscreens typically found in conditioner. The main purpose of crème rinse is to detangle hair and reduce static electricity. In the 1950s and '60s, crème rinse was one of those luxurious “extras” that was mostly used by older women, not children or teens. That’s why so many of us have painful memories of mom tugging a comb through our tangled wet hair after every shampoo, and muttering “beauty must suffer” whenever we dared to complain.

3. ELECTRIC ROLLERS

 

Children are little sponges, absorbing an amazing amount of information at a young age. Sometimes that’s a good thing, giving them a definite leg up once their formal schooling begins. Other times it can be an embarrassment for the hapless parent—like when her child sings out in clarion tones, “Curlers in your hair, shame on you!” to a stranger in the checkout line at the supermarket. Even though it was considered gauche to go out in public with rollers in your hair, many busy housewives simply tied a scarf around their head in an attempt to cover their rollers and went about their daily errands hoping that their hair would be dry in time for the evening. In the late 1960s Clairol took a step forward in protecting the American public’s eyes from unsightly head hardware by introducing Kindness, a revolutionary set of electric rollers that gave you a head full of curls in about 20 minutes or so. The rollers took 10 minutes to heat up, and they weren’t as insulated as today’s models are, so tiny foam wedges were provided to place between your scalp and the hot curler (burned fingers were just a hazard of instant, or semi-instant, beauty).

4. BRUSH ROLLERS

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We’ve all heard stories about the virginal brides of the 1940s and '50s who, despite the stilted “talk” Mother gave them prior to walking down the aisle, were shocked and/or horrified at what actually occurred on their wedding night. Much less has been recorded from the husband’s point of view: the shocking tableau presented the first time his new wife emerged from the bathroom sans makeup and with her head encased in what looked like barbed wire. Hair dryers were mainly found only in beauty shops, so to get that naturally curly look that would last in between shampoos, women routinely wound their hair in brush rollers before retiring for the night. Finding a comfortable sleeping position while wearing them was something of an art form.

5. ORANGE JUICE CAN ROLLERS

Lady Gaga may have appeared to be a trendsetter when she set her hair with pop cans (or soda cans if you prefer), but women were actually using can technology 50-some years ago. Back when beehive or bouffant hairdos with a maximum of pouf were all the rage, girls cursed with straight hair used rinsed-out cans of frozen orange juice concentrate (with both ends cut out) as makeshift jumbo hair rollers. On the other end of the hair spectrum, girls blessed with naturally curly hair set their hair with cans to flatten their tresses into that straight California surfer-girl look. Keep in mind that blow dryers were not yet commonplace, so—like their brush roller sisters—women often had to sleep with their hair rolled thusly.

6. BONNET HAIR DRYERS

 

Part of the reason women subjected themselves to nightly sleeping-with-rollers-in-their-hair torture was that prior to the mid-1970s there really wasn’t a more time-efficient way to dry one’s hair. There were a few primitive hand-held blow dryers available beginning in the 1920s, but they weighed an average of two pounds, were insulated with asbestos, and only produced a paltry 100 watts of heat. In 1951 General Electric introduced a portable soft-bonnet hair dryer, which was a home version (sort of) of the hard-shell blast furnace dryers that beauty parlors then used. The plastic cap was flexible enough to fit over a head full of rollers, and the “works” part (the motor, etc.) was supposedly light enough to carry around (via a convenient shoulder strap) as the busy housewife attended to her regular daily chores. It was quite the innovation when bonnet dryers with the power to dry hair in just 22 minutes eventually hit the market.

7. HOME PERMANENTS

 

Toni introduced the home permanent in the late 1940s, and the product flew off the supermarket shelves into the homes of women who wanted to save the cost of a salon wave. Other brands like Lilt and Rave followed, but thanks to an aggressive, long-running ad campaign (“Which twin has the Toni?”) “Toni” became as synonymous with a home perm as “Kleenex” did with facial tissue. Suddenly every mom became a kitchen table hairdresser, completely ignoring the fact that there’s a good reason it takes many months of study for a stylist to become licensed. As a result, many young girls of the 1950s dreaded those special times of year—back to school, Easter—when Mom decided that it was “time to give you a Toni.”

8. AEROSOL HAIRSPRAY

 

That hole in the ozone layer we hear so much about? I’m loathe to point fingers, but I have a feeling the elaborate bouffants and flips of the 1960s had something to do with it. Mary Tyler Moore admitted that her Dick Van Dyke Show on-set stylist sprayed her flip so solidly that “you could hang clothes on it,” and Barry Williams (of Brady Bunch fame) reminisced in his autobiography about a guest spot on That Girl in which Marlo Thomas spent every off-camera moment having her hair teased and sprayed until it could deflect bullets. As mentioned earlier, shampooing more than once per week was out of the question, so when a lady’s hairdo started to go limp, it was hairspray to the rescue. Women moistened their hair with Aquanet, White Rain, or VO5 before re-setting it with rollers or giant clips. Those cans were filled with fluorocarbons as well as the other ingredients that lacquered hair into submission, and people spritzed that stuff with abandon until the FDA stepped in and hair styles gradually changed to a more “natural” look.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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12 Very Haunted Roads

Don't get caught on these roads at night.
Don't get caught on these roads at night.
Pixabay, Pexels // CC0

What could be scarier than driving down a dark road at night? Driving down one of these dark roads at night. If any of the below routes—compiled by Commercial Truck Trader—pop up on your GPS this spooky season, consider finding an alternate way to your destination.

1. Jeremy Swamp Road // Southbury, Connecticut

Jeremy Swamp Road and several other streets in southwestern Connecticut are said to be frequented by Melon Heads, creatures that, according to the New England Historical Society, live in wooded areas and “look like small humanoids with oversized heads” that “survive by eating small animals, stray cats and human flesh, usually the flesh of teenagers.” Some say the Melon Heads are the result of inbreeding, with others theorizing that they escaped from local hospitals or asylums.

2. Owaissa Street // Appleton, Wisconsin

Legend has it that every full moon, a tombstone in Owaissa Street’s Riverside Cemetery bleeds. The tombstone belongs to Kate Blood, who, according to some stories, was either a witch who killed her husband and children with an ax, or was a woman murdered by her husband. (Local historians, however, say Blood died of tuberculosis.) Visitors also report seeing a creepy hooded figure roaming the cemetery.

3. Prospector’s Road // Garden Valley, California

Driving along this hilly, three-mile stretch of road is not for the faint of heart: It’s supposedly haunted by the spirit of a tall, bearded prospector who was murdered after he drunkenly bragged about his claim. According to Weird California, those who run into the entity—who is supposedly responsible for many an accident along the road—will hear him whisper: “Get off my claim.”

4. Sandhill Road // Las Vegas, Nevada

The flood tunnels beneath Sandhill Road between Olive Avenue and Charleston Boulevard in Las Vegas are said to be haunted by a dead couple. People have also reported hearing creepy, ghostly moans coming from the darkness and being chased by the specter of an old woman.

5. Bloody Bride Bridge // Steven’s Point, Wisconsin

Drivers on Highway 66 in Steven’s Point, Wisconsin, might get a glimpse of the ghost of a bride who was supposedly killed on her wedding day in a car accident on the bridge. Legend has it that if those drivers park on the bridge at midnight and look in their rearview mirrors, they’ll see the bride, in her bloody wedding dress, sitting in the backseat.

6. Boy Scout Lane // Steven’s Point, Wisconsin

Also located in Steven’s Point, the isolated Boy Scout Lane is supposedly where a group of Boy Scouts died, although no one quite seems to know why or how—some say they were killed while camping when their fire raged out of control; others say it was a bus accident; and some say they simply disappeared. Whatever the reason, visitors to the area now say they can hear footsteps and calls for help coming from the woods.

7. Route 66 // Villa Ridge, Missouri

Located on Route 66, the abandoned Tri-County Truck-Stop is a hotbed of ghostly activity. Before the restaurant shut down, employees reported hearing strange noises, seeing apparitions, and watching as coffee pots were thrown across the room by invisible forces.

8. Stagecoach Road // Marshall, Texas

On this red dirt road—which once served as a route for stagecoaches traveling to the town from Shreveport, Louisiana—paranormal investigators have snapped photos of ghosts and had the batteries of the equipment they were using to investigate drain inexplicably. Others who have driven down the road and turned off their cars said they felt a presence stepping on the bumper; when they went home, they discovered tiny handprints in the red dust on the back of the car. The road is supposedly haunted by the spirit of a Voodoo priestess.

9. Route 666 // Douglas, Arizona

The road formerly known as Route 666 may now be part of Route 491 [PDF], but some still call it The Devil’s Highway. Drivers traveling on this section of highway have recounted being pursued by a pack of terrifying dogs or a phantom semi-truck, among other strange and scary encounters.

10. Goatman's Bridge // Denton, Texas

Old Alton Bridge is an iron-truss structure built in 1884 that got its unsettling moniker from local legends. Fifty years after the bridge was built, a successful Black goat farmer named Oscar Washburn—who went by the nickname “Goatman”—put a sign on the bridge that read “This Way to the Goatman.” The sign incensed the Ku Klux Klan, who hanged Washburn on the bridge. But according to Legends of America, “when they looked over to make sure he was dead, they could see only the rope. Washburn was gone and was never seen again.” Some report seeing a man herding goats across the bridge, which was decommissioned around 2001, while others say they’ve seen a half-man, half-goat creature there.

11. Route 375 // Rachel, Nevada

Entertaining the idea of a close encounter? Drivers on this road—which runs near the Nevada Test and Training Range, home of Area 51—have reported hundreds of strange, potentially alien sightings from Alamo to Tonopah, leading to the route’s nickname: “The Extraterrestrial Highway.”

12. Ortega Ridge Road // Montecito, California

This road is haunted by Las Ters Hermanas, or The Three Sisters—three nuns who, it’s said, were murdered more than a century ago. They can be seen standing on the side of the road, arms crossed, their eyes bright blue and their faces glowing.