Mental Floss

These Posters Highlight Women in Science Worth Knowing About

Michele Debczak
AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK
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Because Marie Curie shouldn't be the only female scientist on your radar

Women have made significant contributions to the STEM fields, but their names and faces are often overshadowed by those of their male colleagues. In an effort to bring more deserving women into the public eye, Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya recently launched the “Beyond Curie” project on Kickstarter.

For many people, the list of female scientists they can name off hand starts and ends with Marie Curie. As a designer with a background in neuroscience, Phingbodhipakkiya decided to use her skills to shine a spotlight on women who’ve received less attention. Her series of graphic posters include 16 Nobel Prize winners and 16 additional scientists who’ve also made noteworthy achievements in their fields. Backers have three weeks left to reserve a medium print of their favorite poster for a pledge of $35. After covering the production costs, all of the remaining money that the campaign raises will be donated to the Association for Women in Science. Check out some highlights from the collection below.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Up until her death in 1865Margaret Ann Bulkley, a surgeon for the British military, practiced medicine as her alter-ego "James Barry." After it was revealed that the respected doctor was actually a woman, the army placed an embargo on her military record that lasted a century.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

American medical physicist Rosalyn Sussman Yalow won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1977 for developing the radioimmunoassay technique.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Italian Nobel Laureate Rita Levi-Montalcini was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1986 for her discovery of nerve growth factor.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

On August 13, 2014, Maryam Mirzakhani was awarded the most prestigious honor in mathematics: the Fields Medal. She’s the first woman and the first Iranian to ever receive the award.



AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

On September 12, 1992, engineer, astronaut, and physician Mae Jemison became the first black woman to enter space.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Born in Vienna, Austria in 1878, Lise Meitner’s research on nuclear fission led to the development of the atomic bomb.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Katherine Johnson (one of the three black female mathematicians portrayed in the film Hidden Figures) made calculations for NASA that were instrumental to America’s first manned spaceflight in 1960, the orbital mission of John Glenn in 1962, and the Apollo 11 lunar mission in 1969.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi is the French virologist responsible for discovering the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1983.



AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

Chien-Shiung Wu was born in China and moved to America after graduating from college. Her research at Columbia University disproved the "Law of Conservation of Parity,” but she was passed over for the Nobel Prize in 1957 in favor of her colleagues.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

After helping discover that the enzyme telomerase protects telomeres from progressive shortening, Carol W. Greider became one of two female scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

In 1983, Barbara McClintock became the first and only woman to receive an unshared Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her discovery of genetic transposition.

AMANDA PHINGBODHIPAK

“The world’s first computer programmer,” Ada Lovelace helped develop Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine. She made spot-on predictions about the computer’s potential a hundred years before they came true.

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