Why Does Alcohol Cause the Spins?

viewapart/iStock via Getty Images
viewapart/iStock via Getty Images

You lie down to get some sleep after a long night of drinking, and the room seems to be spinning uncontrollably. What gives?

The spins happen because of an odd effect alcohol has on your ears -- specifically, on three tiny, fluid-filled structures called the semicircular canals. Inside each of these canals is a fluid called endolymph and a gelationous structure called the cupula, which is filled with cells covered in fine, hair-like stereocilia.

As you move around, the movement of the endolymph lags behind the more solid cupula, distorting and bending it -- and those little hairs. When the hairs bend, the electrical signal they send to your brain is altered, helping you to make sense of the rotations your head experiences on each of the three planes the canals sit on -- movements up and down, left and right and backward and forward -- and keep your balance.

Booze throws this system out of whack. Alcohol thins the blood, and when boozy blood travels to the inner ear, it creates a density difference between the cupula and the fluid in the canals, and distorts the cupula's shape. The little hairs bend and send a signal to your brain that tells it you’re rotating when you’re really not, and this illusion of motion makes it seem like the room is spinning.

Some of the things that you most want to do when you’re good and drunk, like lie down and close your eyes, make the sensation worse, since you don’t have any visual or physical cues to counteract the false sense of motion. Looking at a fixed object and keeping your feet planted on the ground can help lessen the effect, but there's no real way to stop it.

Busch Is Donating Three Months’ Worth of Beer to People Who Adopt or Foster Shelter Dogs During the Coronavirus Pandemic

This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
Nataba/iStock via Getty Images

If getting to play with a happy, lovable pup isn’t already enough of an incentive to foster or adopt a shelter dog, Busch is throwing in a bonus—three months’ worth of free beer.

CNN reports that the “Foster a Dog, Get Busch” deal is available to the first 500 people who foster or adopt from Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS) in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Fostering is free, and adoption costs between $200 and $600 (which covers all required vetting services, including deworming, vaccines, spaying or neutering, and more).

The offer is meant to encourage folks to help animals in need at a time when many shelters are canceling adoption events or temporarily shutting down to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus. According to People, Busch is donating an additional $25,000 to MARS to keep the animals safe and cared for.

“During these uncertain and lonelier times, people need an escape: cue the cute puppy memes and photos,” a Busch spokesperson told People. “But as much as we need those cute puppy pics to help get us through social distancing, it’s actually them who need us.”

If you’re interested in hanging out with a MARS rescue and a refreshing bottle of Busch, you can apply to foster a dog here. Once you’ve finished the process and received a confirmation email from the shelter, you should send a screenshot of that email to Busch through Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram before April 25. (Since only the first 500 people will be able to claim your prize, we recommend passing along that confirmation email as soon as you get it.) Busch will respond to winners via social media and send them each a prepaid debit card for $100.

You can take Busch’s advice and use it to buy a hefty supply of alcohol, or you can spend it on something else that’ll help pass the time during self-isolation—like a pop culture subscription box, or products for an indoor garden.

[h/t CNN]

10 Things You Can Lift Instead of Dumbbells at Home

This Corgi puppy is the cuddliest dumbbell we ever did see.
This Corgi puppy is the cuddliest dumbbell we ever did see.
Tatomm/iStock via Getty Images

Right now, the prospect of handling dumbbells that have been touched by any number of strangers in your neighborhood gym might not seem very appealing—that is, if your gym is still open. For those of you who don’t want to buy your own dumbbells (or simply can’t find a store that has them in stock), we’re here to help you make do with what you might already have at home.

A six-pack of 12-ounce cans of beer weighs about 5 pounds, which is perfect for novice lifters who love to crack open a cold one as a reward for working out. Other options for people who usually reach for 5-pound dumbbells include a full ream of printer paper, a bag of all-purpose flour, and a regular red brick.

Seasoned bench-pressers without an at-home gym set up in their garage might still find some useful equipment in there—a spare tire, for example, weighs about 25 pounds. And it’ll take you more than a little muscle to do a few reps with your treasured collection of hardcover Harry Potter books, which weighs 20 pounds. Speaking of books, the third edition of the Oxford American Dictionary comes in around 7 pounds, but you can always stack it with some other heavy volumes to hit your ideal lifting weight.

Pets can help you reach your exercise goals, too, if they have the right temperament. Your cat probably weighs around 10 pounds, and a grown male golden retriever is likely between 65 and 75 pounds. Are you wondering if this is a good excuse to adopt a pet? The answer is yes.

See our top 10 makeshift dumbbells below, and pick out a movie to watch while you lift here.

  1. A standard-sized brick // 4.2 pounds
  1. A six-pack of canned beer // 5 pounds
  1. A ream of printer paper // 5 pounds
  1. A bag of all-purpose flour // 5 pounds
  1. The Oxford American Dictionary, Third Edition // 7 pounds
  1. A gallon of milk // 8.6 pounds
  1. A cat // 10 pounds
  1. A bag of dry dog food // 15 pounds
  1. A hardcover box set of Harry Potter books // 20 pounds
  1. A new car tire // 25 pounds

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