The Mister Softee Jingle Has Lyrics

Anyone who grew up with a Mister Softee ice cream truck surely remembers what the jingle sounds like. But did you know that the tune, which was written in 1960 by Les Waas, has both a title ("Mister Softee Jingle and Chimes") and lyrics? Here they are:

Here comes Mister Softee
The soft ice cream man.
The creamiest, dreamiest soft ice cream,
You get from Mister Softee.
For a refreshing delight supreme
Look for Mister Softee.

My milkshakes and my sundaes
And my cones are such a treat.
Listen for my store on wheels
Ding-a-ling down the street.
The creamiest dreamiest soft ice cream,
You get from Mister Softee.

You can make it your ringtone here.

This story has been updated for 2019.

Still Struggling to Solve a Rubik’s Cube? There’s an App for That

francisgonsa, iStock via Getty Images
francisgonsa, iStock via Getty Images

Solving a Rubik's Cube is an easy way to impress your friends, but you don't need to be a math genius to crack the algorithm. With help from this app spotted by Lifehacker, you don't even need to memorize any tricks.

The Magic Cube Solver is a free app for iOS that calculates the fastest route to solving a Rubik's Cube based on its current pattern. To use it, start by inputting your cube's information by tapping the squares in the app's model and selecting the right colors. Hit "solve" and the tool will display step-by-step visual instructions you can follow to complete the puzzle. The stages are all laid out together and each one comes with a picture of what the cube looks like before and after you make your move, making it easy to follow along. No matter what configuration you're starting with, Magic Cube Solver will show you how to solve it in no more than 22 steps.

The app acts as more than a cheat to a particularly hard pattern. If you're interested in boosting your Rubik's Cube skills, you can select the "solve and learn" option after entering your information. This not only shows you the steps to take to solve it, but why it suggests those steps in the first place. Rather than applying a one-size-fits-all trick to every cube configuration, which isn't always efficient, Magic Cube Solver will teach how to recognize different patterns and show you which tricks work best for each one. The ultimate goal is to equip you with the skills you need to solve any Rubik's Cube without the app's help.

Magic Cube Solve is available to download from the App Store for free. The free version only shows you how to solve the classic three-by-three square cube. Solutions for two-by-two, four-by-four, and void cubes cost extra. To learn more about the Rubik's Cube and its origins, check out our list.

[h/t Lifehacker]

Washington State Department of Transportation Tweets Images of Possible Sasquatch Sighting

Jarvell Jardey, iStock via Getty Images
Jarvell Jardey, iStock via Getty Images

Washington has long been a hotspot for sasquatch sightings, and the latest possible glimpse of Bigfoot comes straight from the state's government. As K5 News reports, webcams run by the Washington State Department of Transportation captured a figure that bears a strong resemblance to the hairy cryptid.

Most footage shot by the traffic cam above State Route 20 on Sherman Pass is standard fare, but recently, it spotted something unusual. The WSDOT Twitter account shared stills from the stream on January 22 with the caption: "Have you noticed something strange on our Sherman Pass/SR 20 webcam before? If you look closely by the tree on the left there looks to be something ... might be Sasquatch ... We will leave that up to you!"

The images show a dark figure skulking by the trees above the highway. Skeptics not convinced of Bigfoot's presence in Washington State received another piece of evidence the next day. On January 23, the official WSDOT Twitter account for Snoqualmie Pass tweeted video of a possible sasquatch striding across the wildlife crossing on I-90. It's not clear whether the images show something inhuman, a person pulling a hoax, or someone just bundled up for the cold.

Bigfoot sightings are so common in Washington that the legendary creature is written into the state's law. In 1969, Skamania County, Washington, passed official legislation stating that killing Bigfoot was punishable by up to five years in prison.

[h/t K5 News]

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