11 Amazing Facts About the Nipple

The human body is an amazing thing. For each one of us, it's the most intimate object we know. And yet most of us don't know enough about it: its features, functions, quirks, and mysteries. Our series The Body explores human anatomy, part by part. Think of it as a mini digital encyclopedia with a dose of wow.

Despite its relatively small size on the human body, the nipple gets a lot of attention. Biologically, the nipple serves two key functions: In women, nipples deliver milk out of the ducts within the breast to babies, and for women and men, they serve as erogenous zones. Check out our list of fascinating facts about this often-misunderstood body part.

1. THE NIPPLE HAS ITS OWN SWEAT GLANDS.

The nipple is the raised bump or protrusion on top of the breast that sits on the circular area known as the areola. The areola is often much larger in circumference than the actual nipple, as it holds small sweat glands called Montgomery glands (named for William Fetherstone Montgomery, an Irish obstetrician who first described them). The sole function of these glands is to secrete fluids during breastfeeding to lubricate the nipple and to produce a scent that attracts the baby to its mother's breast.

2. NIPPLES CAN POKE IN OR OUT.

Not all nipples point jauntily outward. Men's and women's nipples can be inverted, essentially pointing inward. In the worst-case scenario, "the skin adheres to itself and has to peel open to [turn outward] initially, and [that] can be painful," Constance Chen, a board-certified plastic surgeon and clinical assistant professor of plastic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, tells Mental Floss. For most women, however, an inverted nipple causes neither pain nor prevents breastfeeding with proper technique or nipple shields.

3. SOME PEOPLE HAVE EXTRA NIPPLES.

While most people have two nipples, one atop each breast (yes, both women and men have breasts), some people have extra or "supernumerary" nipples outside of the typical location. One Indian man was even found to have seven.

Leigh Anne O'Connor, a certified lactation consultant in New York, says these extra nipples can appear on or below an area named the Tail of Spence (after Scottish surgeon James Spence), which extends from the breast up into the armpit.

"Some people have nipples in their armpits, or even tiny breasts, and these nipples may leak," O'Connor tells Mental Floss. But an extra nipple is just an extra nipple—no cause for alarm or shame.

4. HERE'S WHY MEN HAVE NIPPLES.

Since the main purpose of nipples is breastfeeding babies, and male breasts do not lactate, it begs the question: Why do men have nipples? Scientists Stephen Jay Gould and Richard C. Lewontin tried to get to the bottom of this conundrum in a seminal paper in 1993.

All human embryos start out essentially the same. If the embryo has XY chromosomes, a gene on the Y chromosome called SRY will activate within a couple weeks of conception and begin to differentiate the embryo into one with male genitals.

However, it turns out that breast tissue begins to develop before SRY kicks in, and since nipples in men essentially do no harm, Gould and Lewontin argue, there has simply never been a good enough reason—evolutionarily speaking—to do away with them. They linger because they're benign. Or as Andrew M. Simons, a professor of biology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario wrote in Scientific American, "The presence of nipples in male mammals is a genetic architectural by-product of nipples in females. So, why do men have nipples? Because females do."

5. THE WORLD'S STRONGEST NIPPLES BELONG TO THE GREAT NIPPULINI.

Who needs pecs when you have nipples like those of The Great Nippulini, a.k.a. Sage Werbock, a performer who makes a living demonstrating the mighty power of his nipples? Each nipple can lift 70 pounds, and he holds a Guinness record for the heaviest vehicle pulled by nipples for 20 meters (66 feet)—988.5 kilograms (2179.27 pounds). He has also lifted a variety of dumbbells, anvils, and bowling balls.

6. THEY'RE VERY SENSITIVE TO STIMULATION.

It's no secret that many people take sexual pleasure from nipple stimulation. However, Michael Reitano, an expert in sexual health and wellness at Roman Health in New York, brings up a study published in 2011 in which researchers set out to map the neurology of sexual stimulation in women. Through MRI imaging, they determined that "when [the nipple is] stimulated, the sensations travel to the same part of the brain that is stimulated when the clitoris, vagina, or cervix is stimulated," Reitano says. The study, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, also confirmed that it was possible for some women to have an orgasm by nipple stimulation alone.

While the same brain mapping has not yet been done on men, "there is every reason to believe that it has some capacity to function as a source of sexual pleasure for men as well," Reitano tells Mental Floss.

7. NIPPLES ARE AS UNIQUE AS FINGERPRINTS.

Nipples come in many colors, including pale pink, reddish-beige, brown, and black. Your own two nipples can even vary from each other, as can the areolae. "They also come in many different shapes," O'Connor says. "Some are more flat, while others can be quite bulbous. A person can have two nipples that look very different from each other. Asymmetry is normal."

8. A SPECIFIC KIND OF BREAST CANCER TARGETS THE NIPPLE.

While most forms of breast cancer affect the whole breast, Paget disease of the breast is a rare cancer that targets the skin and ducts of the nipple. "Most patients get a rash on the nipples that looks like a severe case of eczema. It is a cancer of breast epithelial (skin) cells," Chen says. Paget disease of the breast represents between 0.5 and 5 percent of all breast cancers.

9. AFTER MASTECTOMY, NIPPLE SENSATION CAN OCCASIONALLY BE RESTORED.

In breast cancer cases where mastectomy—removal of the breast—is necessary, it is sometimes possible to spare the nipple, allowing for a more realistic post-treatment reconstruction, though sensation is often lost. However, Chen says that in certain cases, "it is possible to restore sensation to the nipples with nerve repairs and nerve grafts when a woman undergoes natural tissue breast reconstruction. Sensory restoration to the nipple after mastectomy is very cutting edge, but if you find the right surgeon, it is possible."

10. NIPPLE STIMULATION CAN HELP INDUCE LABOR IN PREGNANT WOMEN.

When a woman is ready to give birth but the baby isn't, one piece of often-shared advice is to stimulate the mother's nipples to induce labor. A 2005 analysis of six trial studies found a significant decrease in the number of women who hadn't gone into labor after 72 hours. Just under 63 percent of the women who received stimulation were not in labor versus 94 percent who hadn't received it.

The mechanism isn't entirely clear, but breast stimulation causes the uterus to contract. It may also help release the hormone oxytocin, which can start contractions. Once the baby's born, the baby's suckling also has benefits for the mother. "When a newborn suckles, the increased oxytocin causes the uterus to contract [and shrink to its original size over the subsequent weeks] following birth," Reitano explains.

11. BREAST MILK HAS MULTIPLE WAYS TO EXIT THE NIPPLE.

If you've ever pumped your own breast milk or seen it done, you may have noticed that the milk doesn't just come out in a single stream. In a typical nipple, "There are between four and 20 outlets for the milk to come out—it can look like one stream or [coming from] various holes," O'Connor says.

7 Facts About Blood

Moussa81/iStock via Getty Images
Moussa81/iStock via Getty Images

Everyone knows that when you get cut, you bleed—a result of the constant movement of blood through our bodies. But do you know all of the functions the circulatory system actually performs? Here are some surprising facts about human blood—and a few cringe-worthy theories that preceded the modern scientific understanding of this vital fluid.

1. Doctors still use bloodletting and leeches to treat diseases.

Ancient peoples knew the circulatory system was important to overall health. That may be one reason for bloodletting, the practice of cutting people to “cure” everything from cancer to infections to mental illness. For the better part of two millennia, it persisted as one of the most common medical procedures.

Hippocrates believed that illness was caused by an imbalance of four “humors”—blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile. For centuries, doctors believed balance could be restored by removing excess blood, often by bloodletting or leeches. It didn’t always go so well. George Washington, for example, died soon after his physician treated a sore throat with bloodletting and a series of other agonizing procedures.

By the mid-19th century, bloodletting was on its way out, but it hasn’t completely disappeared. Bloodletting is an effective treatment for some rare conditions like hemochromatosis, a hereditary condition causing your body to absorb too much iron.

Leeches have also made a comeback in medicine. We now know that leech saliva contains substances with anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, and anesthetic properties. It also contains hirudin, an enzyme that prevents clotting. It lets more oxygenated blood into the wound, reducing swelling and helping to rebuild tiny blood vessels so that it can heal faster. That’s why leeches are still sometimes used in treating certain circulatory diseases, arthritis, and skin grafting, and helps reattach fingers and toes. (Contrary to popular belief, even the blood-sucking variety of leech is not all that interested in human blood.)

2. Scientists didn't understand how blood circulation worked until the 17th century.

William Harvey, an English physician, is generally credited with discovering and demonstrating the mechanics of circulation, though his work developed out of the cumulative body of research on the subject over centuries.

The prevailing theory in Harvey’s time was that the lungs, not the heart, moved blood through the body. In part by dissecting living animals and studying their still-beating hearts, Harvey was able to describe how the heart pumped blood through the body and how blood returned to the heart. He also showed how valves in veins helped control the flow of blood through the body. Harvey was ridiculed by many of his contemporaries, but his theories were ultimately vindicated.

3. Blood types were discovered in the early 20th century.

Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner discovered different blood groups in 1901, after he noticed that blood mixed from people with different types would clot. His subsequent research classified types A, B and O. (Later research identified an additional type, AB). Blood types are differentiated by the kinds of antigens—molecules that provoke an immune system reaction—that attach to red blood cells.

People with Type A blood have only A antigens attached to their red cells but have B antigens in their plasma. In those with Type B blood, the location of the antigens is reversed. Type O blood has neither A nor B antigens on red cells, but both are present in the plasma. And finally, Type AB has both A and B antigens on red cells but neither in plasma. But wait, there’s more! When a third antigen, called the Rh factor, is present, the blood type is classified as positive. When Rh factor is absent, the blood type is negative.

Scientists still don’t understand why humans have different blood types, but knowing yours is important: Some people have life-threatening reactions if they receive a blood type during a transfusion that doesn’t “mix” with their own. Before researchers developed reliable ways to detect blood types, that tended to turn out badly for people receiving an incompatible human (or animal!) blood transfusion.

4. Blood makes up about 8 percent of our total body weight.

Adult bodies contain about 5 liters (5.3 quarts) of blood. An exception is pregnant women, whose bodies can produce about 50 percent more blood to nourish a fetus.)

Plasma, the liquid portion of blood, accounts for about 3 liters. It carries red and white blood cells and platelets, which deliver oxygen to our cells, fight disease, and repair damaged vessels. These cells are joined by electrolytes, antibodies, vitamins, proteins, and other nutrients required to maintain all the other cells in the body.

5. A healthy red blood cell lasts for roughly 120 days.

Red blood cells contain an important protein called hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to all the other cells in our bodies. It also carries carbon dioxide from those cells back to the lungs.

Red blood cells are produced in bone marrow, but not everyone produces healthy ones. People with sickle cell anemia, a hereditary condition, develop malformed red blood cells that get stuck in blood vessels. These blood cells last about 10 to 20 days, which leads to a chronic shortage of red blood cells, often causing to pain, infection, and organ damage.

6. Blood might play a role in treating Alzheimer's disease.

In 2014, research led by Stanford University scientists found that injecting the plasma of young mice into older mice improved memory and learning. Their findings follow years of experiments in which scientists surgically joined the circulatory systems of old and young mice to test whether young blood could reverse signs of aging. Those results showed rejuvenating effects of a particular blood protein on the organs of older mice.

The Stanford team’s findings that young blood had positive effects on mouse memory and learning sparked intense interest in whether it could eventually lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related conditions.

7. The sight of blood can make people faint.

For 3 to 4 percent of people, squeamishness associated with blood, injury, or invasive medical procedures like injections rises to the level of a true phobia called blood injury injection phobia (BII). And most sufferers share a common reaction: fainting.

Most phobias cause an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and often muscle tension, shakes, and sweating: part of the body’s sympathetic nervous system’s “fight or flight” response. But sufferers of BII experience an added symptom. After initially increasing, their blood pressure and heart rate will abruptly drop.

This reaction is caused by the vagus nerve, which works to keep a steady heart rate, among other things. But the vagus nerve sometimes overdoes it, pushing blood pressure and heart rate too low. (You may have experienced this phenomenon if you’ve ever felt faint while hungry, dehydrated, startled, or standing up too fast.) For people with BII, the vasovagal response can happen at the mere sight or suggestion of blood, needles, or bodily injury, making even a routine medical or dental checkup cause for dread and embarrassment.

What Purpose Does the Belly Button Serve?

misuma/iStock via Getty Images
misuma/iStock via Getty Images

While your eyelashes are protecting your eyes, your lungs are letting you breathe, and virtually every other part of your body—inside and out—is performing its own relatively well-known task, your belly button is just sitting there collecting lint. And while it’s true that your navel served its most important purpose before you were born, it’s not totally useless now.

According to ZME Science, back when you were a fetus, your belly button was more of a belly portal: Your umbilical cord extended from it and connected you to the placenta on your mother’s uterine wall. That way, the placenta could channel nutrients and oxygen to you through the cord, and you could send back waste.

Your umbilical cord was cut when you were born, creating a tiny bulge that left behind some scar tissue after it healed. That scar tissue is your belly button, navel, or umbilicus. Though you may have heard that the shape of your belly button is a direct result of the scissor skills of the doctor who delivered you, that’s not true. Dr. Dan Polk, a neonatologist in the Chicago area, told the Chicago Tribune that a belly button's shape “has to do with how much baby skin leads onto the umbilical cord from the baby’s body. Less skin makes an innie; more skin makes an outie.” About 90 percent of people have innies.

Regardless of how your belly button looks, you probably don’t use it on a daily basis. However, if you’ve studied anatomy, medicine, or a related field, you might recognize it as the central point by which the abdomen is divided into the following quadrants: right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower. Another way of classifying that area is into nine regions—including the hypochondriac, lumbar, iliac, epigastric, and hypogastric regions—with the umbilical region at the very center.

Abdominopelvic regions diagram
Blausen Medical, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

Your belly button can also serve as the opening for laparoscopic surgery, which can save you from having a scar elsewhere on your abdomen.

The navel is a great central landmark outside of medicine, too. If you’ve taken yoga or Pilates classes, you may have heard it referred to as the center of balance or center of gravity. Because it sits right on top of your abdominal muscles, your belly button is an easy marker for your instructor to mention when they want you to access your core, which helps you balance.

And, of course, belly buttons are notorious for storing quite a bit of lint, which always seems to be blue (you can learn more about that here).

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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