The Hottest Day in Each State

NOAA Climate.gov/NCEI
NOAA Climate.gov/NCEI

Here’s the good news: By the end of July, most areas of the U.S. will likely have already experienced the hottest day of the year, Newsweek reports. But if you happen to live in parts of Texas, southern Florida, or the West Coast—where the hottest day typically occurs between August 1 and September 1—you’re not in the clear just yet.

A map of the U.S. showing the warmest day of the year by location was created using climate data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

To enlarge the map click here.NOAA Climate.gov/NCEI
NOAA Climate.gov/NCEI

It wasn’t just temperature that was considered, either. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), precipitation, snowfall, and frost and freeze dates from 1981 to 2010 were also taken into account to create climate normals, or averages of several climatological variables.

Looking at the different colors represented on the map, it’s clear that the hottest day of the year varies greatly—from the beginning of June to the end of October—depending on the region.

Texas is an especially unique case because its hottest day varies from June 1 to September 1. One region bordering the Mexican state of Chihuahua tends to see its hottest day pretty early on, in the first half of June, while another region near Corpus Christi tends to heat up at the tail end of August. That’s also the case for parts of coastal California, Hawaii, and Louisiana.

Different environmental factors are to blame for the disparity, such as the monsoon season’s effect on temperatures in the Southwest. The hottest period in that region tends to be in June, right before the clouds and rain roll in, NOAA notes.

Although the map outlines a “normal window” for hottest temperature based on historical data, there are always exceptions to the rule.

[h/t Newsweek]

Amazon’s Big Fall Sale Features Deals on Electronics, Kitchen Appliances, and Home Décor

Dash/Keurig
Dash/Keurig

If you're looking for deals on items like Keurigs, BISSELL vacuums, and essential oil diffusers, it's usually pretty slim pickings until the holiday sales roll around. Thankfully, Amazon is starting these deals a little earlier with their Big Fall Sale, where customers can get up to 20 percent off everything from home decor to WFH essentials and kitchen gadgets. Now you won’t have to wait until Black Friday for the deal you need. Make sure to see all the deals that the sale has to offer here and check out our favorites below.

Electronics

Dash/Amazon

- BISSELL Lightweight Upright Vacuum Cleaner $170 (save $60)

- Dash Deluxe Air Fryer $80 (save $20)

- Dash Rapid 6-Egg Cooker $17 (save $3)

- Keurig K-Café Single Coffee Maker $169 (save $30)

- COMFEE Toaster Oven $29 (save $9)

- AmazonBasics 1500W Oscillating Ceramic Heater $31 (save $4)

Home office Essentials

HP/Amazon

- HP Neverstop Laser Printer $250 (save $30)

- HP ScanJet Pro 2500 f1 Flatbed OCR Scanner $274 (save $25)

- HP Printer Paper (500 Sheets) $5 (save $2)

- Mead Composition Books Pack of 5 Ruled Notebooks $11 (save $2)

- Swingline Desktop Hole Punch $7 (save $17)

- Officemate OIC Achieva Side Load Letter Tray $15 (save $7)

- PILOT G2 Premium Rolling Ball Gel Pens 12-Pack $10 (save $3)

Toys and games

Selieve/Amazon

- Selieve Toys Old Children's Walkie Talkies $17 (save $7)

- Yard Games Giant Tumbling Timbers $59 (save $21)

- Duckura Jump Rocket Launchers $11 (save $17)

- EXERCISE N PLAY Automatic Launcher Baseball Bat $14 (save $29)

- Holy Stone HS165 GPS Drones with 2K HD Camera $95 (save $40)

Home Improvement

DEWALT/Amazon

- DEWALT 20V MAX LED Hand Held Work Light $54 (save $65)

- Duck EZ Packing Tape with Dispenser, 6 Rolls $11 (save $6)

- Bissell MultiClean Wet/Dry Garage Auto Vacuum $111 (save $39)

- Full Circle Sinksational Sink Strainer with Stopper $5 (save $2)

Home Décor

NECA/Amazon

- A Christmas Story 20-Inch Leg Lamp Prop Replica by NECA $41 save $5

- SYLVANIA 100 LED Warm White Mini Lights $8 (save 2)

- Yankee Candle Large Jar Candle Vanilla Cupcake $17 (save $12)

- Malden 8-Opening Matted Collage Picture Frame $20 (save $8)

- Lush Decor Blue and Gray Flower Curtains Pair $57 (save $55)

- LEVOIT Essential Oil Diffuser $25 (save $5)

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The Strange Things Each State Is Googling Right Now

If the owner of this computer is from Arkansas, they're about to Google "Little Debbie cakes."
If the owner of this computer is from Arkansas, they're about to Google "Little Debbie cakes."
Caio, Pexels

Career resources company Zippia recently mined Google Trends data from April 2020 to August 2020 in an attempt to discover what offbeat topics are ruling people’s search bars in different states. The results are in, and the map below is a rather eclectic portrait of a nation in quarantine.

The most consistent theme throughout the country seems to be alcohol, though there’s a total lack of consensus when it comes to what kind. Mississippi and South Carolina have beaten the heat with frosty treats—vodka pops and frosé, a portmanteau of frozen rosé, respectively—and Minnesota has kept it classy with boxed wine. New Mexico has taken up day drinking, while their neighbors to the north in Colorado are asking Google “how to stop drinking” altogether.

Virginia is for lovers of grilled cheese.Zippia

States have various ways of coping with the absence of dine-in restaurants, too. Rhode Island is getting lots of Chinese takeout, but Alaska favors pizza delivery. Residents of Washington state, on the other hand, are learning “how to roll sushi.” And although Nevada is experiencing an influx of people “going vegan,” plenty of other Americans are really leaning into meat: “hot wings,” “BBQ,” “Chick-fil-A,” “chicken nuggets,” and “McDonald’s value menu,” are all on the map.

Other states are keeping busy in the kitchen. Hawaiians are baking banana bread, Vermontians are tending to sourdough starters, and Michiganders are figuring out how to turn cannabis into spreadable “cannabutter.”

People in Missouri are apparently searching for meth recipes, which we’re assuming just means that Breaking Bad binge-watchers are curious about the science behind the show. And if you see someone snoozing on the job in Florida, don’t be surprised—Floridians are picking up tips on “how to sleep at work.”

See Zippia’s full breakdown here.