Meet the Artist Who's Drawing Every Character From Every Coen Brothers Movie Ever Made

Stephen Case
Stephen Case

Ethan and Joel Coen have directed 17 films spanning three decades, and in that time, they’ve brought some pretty memorable characters to life. They’ve given us the laid-back Dude from The Big Lebowski (1998), the bloodthirsty Anton Chigurh of No Country for Old Men (2007), and Ulysses, a charming “Dapper Dan man” who leads a band of escaped criminals in O Brother Where Art Thou (2000).

A caricature of Anton Chigurh
Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
Stephen Case

As it turns out, these characters aren’t just enjoyable to watch—they’re also fun to draw, according to Hong Kong-based artist Stephen Case, who's currently making caricatures of every character from every Coen brothers film ever made. If you count major and minor characters—plus some of the more intriguing extras, and the cast of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, a forthcoming anthology film—that works out to be well over 700 planned drawings.

This estimate is based on the 100-plus hours of research that Case has put into the project, a figure that doesn't include the time it takes to actually create each drawing. While this may seem like a daunting task, Case has enjoyed rewatching all 17 films, beginning with Blood Simple (1984) and ending with Hail, Caesar! (2016). Case said the idea for the project came from friend and fellow artist Harvey Chan, and it was an opportunity he couldn’t pass up.

“What I love about the Coens is, firstly, I'm a huge fan. One of my all-time favorite movies is The Big Lebowski, but they also have many other classics,” Case tells Mental Floss. “Secondly, all their characters are so ripe for caricature, from the lead characters down to the extras.”

Take, for instance, Chad—a dim-witted gym employee in Burn After Reading (2008) who's often seen with his mouth agape.

A caricature of Chad Feldheimer
Brad Pitt as Chad Feldheimer in Burn After Reading
Stephen Case/Netflix

While watching a movie, Case takes screenshots of the characters he wants to depict, then separates the images into individual computer files.

Next, it’s time to draw. He typically starts with a pencil sketch, then scans the image into his computer and uses Photoshop to digitally add in the color and brushwork. The goal is to achieve a likeness of the character without overexaggerating the features to the point where they're unrecognizable.

Ultimately, Case chooses which characters to include in the project. While he won't take on every extra ever shown in a Coen film, he says he will give characters with “decent screen time” or at least one line of dialogue their due diligence.

“For Raising Arizona, I'll only draw one of the babies rather than all of them, for example,” Case says, referring to the scene in which infertile ex-convict H.I. McDunnough, played by Nicolas Cage, kidnaps one of five babies belonging to a local businessman.

A caricature of H.I. McDunnough
Nicolas Cage as H.I. McDunnough in Raising Arizona
Stephen Case

Case also finds inspiration in characters that make an outsized impression for the relatively short time they spend on screen, like the mysterious visitor in the opening of A Serious Man (2009), who is believed to be a dybbuk (Yiddish evil spirit).

"This is going to be one of the best parts of this project—drawing faces like this," Case wrote in a caption accompanying the drawing. "Most of the Coen Bros characters are ripe for caricature, but faces like this are a gift from God ... or Yahweh ... or whoever."

Caricature of a Yiddish dybbuk
Fyvush Finkel as a Yiddish dybbuk in A Serious Man
Stephen Case/Netflix

The most obscure drawing he has completed so far, though, is of a curmudgeonly man who appears for one second in a painting hanging above Freddy Riedenschneider’s hotel bed in The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001).

“It's probably better to draw people as famous as possible, but with the Coens, some of the best characters are extras or those who have small parts,” Case says. “While they may be wasted on a lot of people, I figure fans of the movies will get a kick out of it.”

As for his favorite Coen character? “If I had to choose one it'd have to be John Goodman's Walter in The Big Lebowski,” Case says.

Some of his caricatures are currently on display at Swing A Cat, the art gallery and studio Case owns in Hong Kong. You can also check out his work on Patreon. He says he’s entertaining the idea of publishing a book of his Coen caricatures down the road.

So far, Case has finished about 35 drawings completely. And while he still has a long way to go to reach his goal, see if you can recognize some of the characters he's drawn already:

A caricature of Abby from Blood Simple
Frances McDormand as Abby in Blood Simple (1984)
Stephen Case

A caricature of Carlotta Valdez
Veronica Osorio as Carlotta Valdez in Hail, Caesar! (2016)
Stephen Case

A caricature of Carson Wells
Woody Harrelson as Carson Wells in No Country for Old Men (2007)
Stephen Case

A caricature of the Big Lebowski
Stephen Case

Learn Python From Home for Just $50

Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels.com
Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels.com

It's difficult to think of a hobby or job that doesn’t involve some element of coding in its execution. Are you an Instagram enthusiast? Coding and algorithms are what bring your friends' posts to your feed. Can’t get enough Mental Floss? Coding brings the entire site to life on your desktop and mobile screens. Even sorting through playlists on Spotify uses coding. If you're tired of playing catch-up with all the latest coding techniques and principles, the 2020 Python Programming Certification Bundle is on sale for $49.99 to teach you to code, challenge your brain, and boost your resume to get your dream job.

Basically, coding is how people speak to computers (cue your sci-fi vision of a chat with a creepy, sentient computer), and while it does sound a bit futuristic, the truth is that people are talking to computers every day through a program called Python. The 2020 Python Programming Training Certification Bundle will teach you how to build web applications, database applications, and web visualizations in the world’s most popular programming language.

Python is also the language computers are using to communicate back to programmers. You’ll learn how Jupyter Notebook, NumPy, and pandas can enhance data analysis and data visualization techniques with Matplotlib.

Think back to your creepy, sci-fi visual from earlier; was it some form of artificial intelligence? Contrary to what you may have seen in the movies, artificial intelligence is something you can learn to create yourself. In the Keras Bootcamp, you’ll learn how to create artificial neural networks and deep-learning structures with Google’s powerful Deep Learning framework.

Coding is associated with endless text, numbers, and symbols, but the work code is performing is hardly limited to copy. Dig deep into image processing and computer vision tasks with sessions in OpenCV. You’ll give yourself an extra edge when you can use Python for sifting through information and implement machine learning algorithms on image classification.

Explore coding education with the bundle’s 12 courses, spanning from beginner to advanced levels, to elevate your skillset from home. The 2020 Python Programming Certification Bundle is on sale for $49.99.

 

The Complete 2020 Python Programming Certification Bundle - $49.99

See Deal



At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

Watch: This Crashing Wave Art Installation in South Korea Brings Seaside Tranquility to a Busy City

These waves won't unexpectedly soak your beach towel when the tide comes in.
These waves won't unexpectedly soak your beach towel when the tide comes in.
d'strict, YouTube

Since residents of Seoul, South Korea, can’t exactly enjoy the sight of ocean waves breaking on the shore during their lunch hour, a design house is bringing them the next best thing: An enormous screen that plays realistic waves on a loop in the middle of the city.

Travel + Leisure reports that the installation, titled WAVE, is an anamorphic illusion, a distorted image that the viewer must observe from a specific angle for it to appear multi-dimensional. It’s on display in K-Pop Square at the Coex Convention and Exhibition Center in the district of Gangnam, but you don’t have to book an international flight to check it out—the creator, a design company called d’strict, shared a mesmerizing video of the work on YouTube.

Over about two months, developers molded two LED displays together to create a screen approximately 262 feet by 65 feet, with a resolution of 7840 pixels by 1952 pixels—almost twice the resolution of ultra-high-definition. In other words, the waves on this screen look more convincing than footage of the actual ocean would on your state-of-the-art living room TV.

For 18 hours a day, locals can watch icy blue swells slosh against the sides of the virtual tank, complete with the tranquil sounds of crashing waves (though they’ll have to rely on their imaginations to catch a whiff of salty sea spray).

Looking for other immersive displays? Dive into 15 awe-inspiring virtual tours here.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]