15 Terrific Alternatives to “Hello”

iStock/Wandeaw
iStock/Wandeaw

First impressions are important, so why be boring when there are so many other ways to greet a person and forge a unique connection. Celebrate World Hello Day by trying out a new salutation.

1. WHAT'S THE CRAIC?

How they say “What’s up?” in Ireland. The craic (pronounced “crack”) is the news, gossip, latest goings-on, or the fun times to be planned.

2. HOW HOPS IT?

Be classically cool with this late 19th-century slang for “How’s it going?”

3. AHOY

Add a little jaunty excitement by getting into pirate mode.

4. [HAT TIP]

Be the strong, silent type and forgo words entirely with an elegant tip of your hat.

5. THERE HE/SHE IS!

Make someone feel like the man or the woman of the hour.

6. CIAO

Feeling friendly and cosmopolitan? Ciao will set the mood. Add a kiss on each cheek for authenticity.

7. S.P.D.S.V.B.E.E.V.

Want to write a letter with a classical Latin feel? Open with this abbreviation for Salute plurimam dicit. Si vales, bene est, ego valeo. “Many greetings. If you’re well, then that’s good, and I’m well too.”

8. SALUTATIONS

Show off your verbal dexterity with this gentleman’s greeting.

9. GREETINGS

Or keep it simple and use the word that means just what it says.

10. HOWDY

Keep it casual, cowpoke, or get fancier with a full-on Howdydo?

11. ALOHA

Bring a little mellow sunshine to your interactions by greeting the Hawaiian way.

12. NAMASTE

Start with a show of respect. This peaceful greeting comes from the Sanskrit for “I bow to you.”

13. HOW'S TRICKS?

You’ve got to smile when you dust off this gem from the 1920s.

14. BREAKER, BREAKER

Open the conversation like a trucker on a CB radio.

15. WELL, LOOK AT YOU!

Reminiscent of the sweet way your grandma used to express how impressed she was with you. Why not spread the love around with this opening?

This article originally ran in 2014.

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Poike/iStock via Getty Images Plus
Poike/iStock via Getty Images Plus

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Why Did Noon Used to Mean 3 p.m.?

3 p.m. is basically noon for people who wake up at 12 p.m.
3 p.m. is basically noon for people who wake up at 12 p.m.
Mckyartstudio/iStock via Getty Images

If you’re a late sleeper, you might find yourself thinking 12 p.m. seems way too early to be considered midday, and the word noon would much better describe, say, 3 p.m. It turns out that ancient Romans would have agreed with you, if only for etymological reasons.

As Reader’s Digest explains, the days in ancient Rome were split into four periods of three hours each. The first hour was at sunrise around 6 a.m.—called prime, for first—followed by 9 a.m. (terce, denoting the third hour), 12 p.m. (sext, for sixth), and 3 p.m. (none, for ninth).

According to Merriam-Webster, Middle and Old English borrowed the time-keeping tradition, along with the Latin word for ninth, which was changed to nōn and eventually noon. Though we’re not sure exactly when or why noon started referring to 12 p.m. instead of 3 p.m., it could have something to do with Christian prayer traditions. In the Bible, Jesus’s crucifixion is said to have taken place at the ninth hour, and that’s when worshippers partook in their second of three daily prayers; the others were in the morning and evening. It’s possible that hungry monks were behind noon’s gradual shift from 3 p.m. to 12 p.m.—since their daily fast didn’t end until after the midday prayer, they had a built-in motive for moving it earlier.

While we didn’t exactly stay true to the original Latin meaning of noon, there’s another important remnant of ancient Rome hiding in the way we tell time today. Romans referred to 12 p.m. as meridiem, for midday, and so do we. A.M. is an abbreviation for ante meridiem, or before midday, and P.M. means post meridiem, or after midday.

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