Drone Captures Footage of an Amazon Tribe Never Seen by the Outside World

It’s estimated that there are still hundreds of uncontacted tribes remaining in the world, and footage of one of them was captured last year by a drone in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest, CBS reports.

The clip—filmed in 2017 but uploaded to YouTube this week by a Brazilian government agency called the National Indian Foundation (FUNAI)—is only 51 seconds long. In the distance, a person can be seen walking through a forest clearing in the Javari River valley, situated in northwest Brazil near the border with Peru. The agency also released photos of an ax, thatched hut, and canoes found in the area.

According to a statement from FUNAI (translated into English by Google), drone surveillance and ground inspections were undertaken to better protect indigenous groups. FUNAI found two groups of outsiders hunting illegally in the area. In addition, they discovered that a landowner and farmers had been encroaching on land reserved for indigenous peoples. These types of activities can lead to deforestation and violence against indigenous communities, according to The New York Times.

“Vigilance and surveillance should be intensified in the region to curb the actions of violators and ensure the full possession of the territory by the indigenous people,” Vitor Góis of FUNAI said in a translated statement.

The Javari Valley is home to seven contacted peoples and seven uncontacted indigenous groups, according to Survival International. Last month, the agency also released footage of a man who is believed to be the last member of a tribe in the Brazilian state of Rondônia along the Bolivian border. Officials say he has lived alone in the jungle for 22 years, ever since his village “fell victim to landowners and loggers,” CBS reports.

[h/t CBS]

We’re Lovin’ the McSki, Sweden’s Ski-Thru McDonald’s

Per-Olof Forsberg, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Per-Olof Forsberg, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Gliding down the slopes for a few hours can leave you happily exhausted and so ravenous that you wish you could stuff a big, juicy burger in your mouth before you even get back to the lodge. At one Swedish ski resort, you can.

Lindvallen, a ski resort located approximately 200 miles northwest of Stockholm, is home to the McSki, a quaint, wood-paneled McDonald’s that you simply ski right up to. If all the surrounding snow leaves you with a hankering for a McFlurry, have at it; Delish reports that you can order anything from the regular McDonald’s menu. (Having said that, we can’t promise the McFlurry machine will actually be working.)

The ski-thru window is ideal for skiers and snowboarders who don’t want to break for a lengthy lunch, but there’s an option for people who would rather not scarf down a combo meal while standing up: According to the blog Messy Nessy, the indoor seating area can accommodate up to 140 people.

The McSki has been delighting (and nourishing) vacationers since it opened in 1996, and it’s definitely a must-visit for ski lovers and fast food aficionados alike. It’s not, however, the strangest McDonald’s restaurant in the world. New Zealand built one inside an airplane, and there’s also a giant Happy Meal-shaped McDonald’s in Dallas. Explore 10 other downright bizarre McDonald’s locations here.

[h/t Delish]

Netflix Is Hiring ‘Nerds’ in Los Angeles and Paris

Netflix's headquarters in Los Angeles.
Netflix's headquarters in Los Angeles.
Netflix

The word nerd might have started out as a mean-spirited schoolyard insult aimed at smart kids, but it has since turned into a term that self-proclaimed nerds wear like a badge of honor. Netflix has taken it one step further by using nerd as an actual job title—and they're currently looking for some in both Los Angeles and Paris.

The Nerds at Netflix are the IT team, so book nerds might want to sit this one out. According to the website, the streaming giant is looking for “smart, motivated” individuals to “provide exceptional technology support to [its] employee base.”

In other words, you’d essentially be responsible for troubleshooting technical problems for staff members. A degree in computer science isn't required, but you will need experience on a technical support team and an in-depth knowledge of Mac and Chrome operating systems, cloud-based services, Windows, Google Apps, and a host of other programs.

A day in the life of a Netflix Nerd could include resetting a few passwords, issuing a company-owned cell phone to a new employee, setting up a video conference, fixing a finicky printer or two, or keeping a careful log of all your resolved requests.

And, since the job is customer service-based, the listing also mentions that applicants should have “patience” and “excellent interpersonal and communication skills.”

The three positions are similar in nature, with a couple key differences. The Paris-based Nerd will live in Paris, of course, and must be fluent in both French and English. The other two positions are both in Los Angeles, but one is for the “Core Support” team that services the entire business, and the other specifically provides support to Los Angeles employees.

Nerd hopefuls can apply here.

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