LEGO Wheelchair Gives Injured Turtle at Maryland Zoo a Second Chance

Courtesy of Maryland Zoo
Courtesy of Maryland Zoo

An injured Eastern box turtle in Maryland has been given a new lease on life thanks to an inventive veterinarian who fashioned a wheelchair out of LEGO bricks and other odds and ends. The turtle was suffering from a fractured plastron (the underside of his shell) when he was picked up at Baltimore's Druid Hill Park and brought to The Maryland Zoo by an employee, CBS Baltimore reports.

Metal bone plates, surgical wire, and sewing clasps were surgically implanted to stabilize his shell, but one problem remained. In order to heal properly, he had to be lifted off the ground. "We were discussing in our medical rounds that he needed to be elevated off the ground and we were thinking of ways we could do that," Garret Fraess, a veterinary extern, says in a video created by The Maryland Zoo.

Fraess said it's unusual for the underside of a turtle's shell to be fractured because usually the back is the part that's most vulnerable. Since no ready-made shell repair kit was available, he had to think creatively. That's when he thought of LEGOs.

After swapping ideas with a "LEGO enthusiast" friend in Denmark, they settled on a blueprint for a wheelchair frame that surrounds the shell and rests on four LEGO wheels. The device has helped keep their reptile friend mobile, and he's responded remarkably well to the lifestyle change. He's now able to "turn on a dime" and "scoot like a normal turtle," Fraess says. Once he heals completely, they'll start removing the pieces bit by bit, but that could take up to a year. Until then, he'll receive the best treatment a turtle can possibly get at the Baltimore zoo.

[h/t CBS Baltimore]

Blue Apron’s Memorial Day Sale Will Save You $60 On Your First Three Boxes

Scott Eisen/Getty Images
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

If you’ve gone through all the recipes you had bookmarked on your phone and are now on a first-name basis with the folks at the local pizzeria, it might be time to introduce a new wrinkle into your weekly dinner menu. But instead of buying loads of groceries and cookbooks to make your own meal, you can just subscribe to a service like Blue Apron, which will deliver all the ingredients and instructions you need for a unique dinner.

And if you start your subscription before May 26, you can save $20 on each of your first three weekly boxes from the company. That means that whatever plan you choose—two or four meals a week, vegetarian or the Signature plan—you’ll save $60 in total.

With the company’s Signature plan, you’ll get your choice of meat, fish, and Beyond foods, along with options for diabetes-friendly and Weight Watchers-approved dishes. The vegetarian plan loses the meat, but still allows you to choose from a variety of dishes like General Tso's tofu and black bean flautas.

To get your $60 off, head to the Blue Apron website and click “Redeem Offer” at the top of the page to sign up.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

Do Dogs Get Headaches?

Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
damedeeso/iStock via Getty Images

Like babies, dogs can be hard to read in the medical ailment department. Are they listless because they’re tired, or because they’re sick? What’s behind their whining? And can they suffer that most human of debilitating conditions, the headache?

Gizmodo polled several veterinarians and animal behavior specialists to find out, and the answer seems to be a resounding yes.

Although a dog can’t express discomfort in a specific way, particularly if it doesn’t involve limping, animal experts know that canines that have diagnosed brain tumors or encephalitis can also be observed to have a high heart rate, a sign of physical pain. According to Tim Bentley, an associate professor of veterinary neurology and neurosurgery at Purdue Veterinary Medicine, administering painkillers will bring a dog’s heart rate down. If signs of physical distress also decrease, a headache was likely involved.

Unfortunately, not all dogs may offer overt signals they’re feeling some brain pain. According to Adam Boyko, an associate professor of biomedical sciences at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, dogs instinctively try to mask pain to avoid showing weakness.

Ultimately, dogs have many of the same central neural pathways as humans, which can likely go awry in some of the same ways. But the kind of persistent headaches owing to head colds or hangovers are probably rare in dogs. And while it goes without saying, they definitely don't need any of your Advil.

[h/t Gizmodo]