LEGO Wheelchair Gives Injured Turtle at Maryland Zoo a Second Chance

Courtesy of Maryland Zoo
Courtesy of Maryland Zoo

An injured Eastern box turtle in Maryland has been given a new lease on life thanks to an inventive veterinarian who fashioned a wheelchair out of LEGO bricks and other odds and ends. The turtle was suffering from a fractured plastron (the underside of his shell) when he was picked up at Baltimore's Druid Hill Park and brought to The Maryland Zoo by an employee, CBS Baltimore reports.

Metal bone plates, surgical wire, and sewing clasps were surgically implanted to stabilize his shell, but one problem remained. In order to heal properly, he had to be lifted off the ground. "We were discussing in our medical rounds that he needed to be elevated off the ground and we were thinking of ways we could do that," Garret Fraess, a veterinary extern, says in a video created by The Maryland Zoo.

Fraess said it's unusual for the underside of a turtle's shell to be fractured because usually the back is the part that's most vulnerable. Since no ready-made shell repair kit was available, he had to think creatively. That's when he thought of LEGOs.

After swapping ideas with a "LEGO enthusiast" friend in Denmark, they settled on a blueprint for a wheelchair frame that surrounds the shell and rests on four LEGO wheels. The device has helped keep their reptile friend mobile, and he's responded remarkably well to the lifestyle change. He's now able to "turn on a dime" and "scoot like a normal turtle," Fraess says. Once he heals completely, they'll start removing the pieces bit by bit, but that could take up to a year. Until then, he'll receive the best treatment a turtle can possibly get at the Baltimore zoo.

[h/t CBS Baltimore]

You’ll Be Able to Buy Some of Fiona the Hippo’s Poop to Fertilize Your Garden

Mark Dumont, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Mark Dumont, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Fiona the hippo has come along way since she was born two months premature at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2017. Today, Fiona is happy and healthy, weighing in at more than 1200 pounds. A hippo that size makes a lot of excrement, and now Fiona fans can purchase some of it to fertilize their gardens, WLWT5 reports.

Fiona produces about 22 pounds of poop a day; just 7 pounds shy of her birth weight. Normally the dung would be sent to a landfill, but as part of its new zero-waste initiative, the Cincinnati Zoo is composting all of its animal waste into fertilizer. Much of it will be added to the zoo's own farm and gardens, but some will also be available to purchase from the zoo's gift shops and online store. The fertilizer will be made from the dung left behind by the hundreds of animals living at the zoo, including Fiona.

The Cincinnati Zoo bills itself as the greenest zoo in the country. In addition to recycling all of its animal waste into compost, it also aims to fill its animal habitats with recycled rain water and grow more food for its animals on its own farm [PDF]. For the zero-waste part of the plan, the zoo plans to repurpose two million pounds of animal feces each year using a combination of on-site and off-site composting.

The zoo is in the process of acquiring the necessary equipment to launch its waste composting program. When the time comes, Fiona will be ready to make her sizable contributions to the project.

[h/t WLWT5]

The Disabled Chihuahua Puppy Who Befriended a Flightless Pigeon Now Has a Tiny Wheelchair

Lundy, the Chihuahua, and his pigeon friend, Herman.
Lundy, the Chihuahua, and his pigeon friend, Herman.
HandicappedPets.com, YouTube

The only thing more heartwarming than an interspecies friendship between a Chihuahua that can’t walk and a pigeon that can’t fly is if the Chihuahua in question happened to own a very tiny wheelchair.

Earlier this month, The Mia Foundation, a nonprofit shelter for special needs animals in Rochester, New York, took to Facebook to share photos of Lundy, a two-month-old Chihuahua without mobility in his back legs, snuggling up with a flightless pigeon named Herman.

"I took Herman out of his playpen to give him some time out and I put him in a dog bed and then I had to tend to Lundy so I put Lundy in with him,” Sue Rogers, who runs the foundation with her husband, Gary, told WHEC. “They just looked really cute together, so I took some pictures and posted them to Facebook and the next morning it was crazy.”

After the post went viral, The Mia Foundation received more than $6000 in monetary donations—and a surprise gift for Lundy. New Hampshire-based pet mobility company Walkin’ Pets provided him with a Mini Walkin’ Wheels wheelchair, a two-wheeled harness meant for disabled animals that weigh between two and 10 pounds. According to a press release from Walkin’ Pets, the shelter had been worried that two-pound Lundy, who could probably fit in the palm of your hand, wouldn’t get the chance to run around with the help of a wheelchair until he grew quite a bit bigger.

lundy the disabled chihuahua with his wheelchair
Lundy patiently waits to try out his new wheelchair.
Walkin' Pets

Newly mobile and even cuter than before, Lundy is now waiting for a kind family to adopt him. Finding a forever home might take him away from his fine feathered friend, but Lundy and Herman’s bond won’t ever be forgotten: There’s now a book called Lundy and Herman that tells their story. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Mia Foundation, and you can order it for $20 here.

[h/t WHEC]

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