Inventor's 'Every Day Calendar' Gives You a Gold Star for Achieving Daily Goals

Courtesy of Simone Giertz
Courtesy of Simone Giertz

When it comes to setting goals and sticking to them, we could all use a little help from time to time. That's where the "Every Day Calendar" comes in. As spotted by Colossal, the electronic board lets you tap each date—prompting the slot to light up—once you've completed your daily goal. Aside from being an intriguing piece of wall art, it also provides positive reinforcement and serves as a visual reminder of your progress.

"It's like a gold star system for yourself because we're adults now so we only get gold stars if we give them to ourselves," Simone Giertz, the inventor of the calendar, says in a Kickstarter video.

Giertz is "mostly known for building things that don't work," as she puts it herself. You may remember her "Wake-Up Machine"—a rubber hand that slaps you in the face when it's time to get out of bed—so this calendar marks somewhat of a departure from her past creations. Giertz said she initially created the product for herself as an experiment, and the results have been life-changing.

"I built the first version of the Every Day Calendar about a year ago because I wanted to start meditating," she says. "I realized that I had been trying to start meditating for almost 10 years but I would always give up after a week or two." She has used the calendar for over a year now, and has practiced meditation every day except for one—when she underwent brain surgery.

The calendar, made by Giertz and a team of engineers, has a "non-volatile memory." This means it won't lose your progress if the power goes out or you turn it off. Plus, if you have a strict "lights out" policy at night, the brightness of the display can be adjusted from fully lit to completely off. The display is made from a printed circuit board, and the hexagonal buttons are fashioned out of gold-immersed copper.

The calendar is still in the funding stage and isn't available for purchase just yet, but the expected release date is December 2019. To back the project or learn more about the calendar, check out the Every Day Calendar's Kickstarter page.

[h/t Colossal]

Dominate Game Night With Godzilla-Themed Monopoly and Jenga

Usaopoly
Usaopoly

Competitive board games have a tendency to bring out players' monstrous sides, and later this year, you'll be able to embrace those destructive impulses with Jenga and Monopoly games inspired by Godzilla.

Both products featuring Japan's iconic mutant menace are a collaboration between games publisher USAopoly (also known as The Op) and entertainment company Toho International, CBR.com reports. The first one, dubbed Monopoly: Godzilla, is billed as a "city-terrorizing twist on the classic board game." The properties available for conquering include Monster Island, Goro’s Workshop, and Kitakami Lake. Instead of the classic game pieces, players use tokens of monsters like Mothra, Rodan, and Godzilla to dominate the board.

The second game pairs so perfectly with Godzilla that it may rival the classic version. In Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition, the block tower resembles a skyscraper taken from downtown Tokyo, and it comes with a cardboard cutout of Godzilla unleashing a beam of atomic breath. With every role of the die, Godzilla moves along the "approach track," increasing the number of blocks removed each turn and hastening the building's destruction.

Godzilla Jenga.
Usaopoly

Monopoly: Godzilla will sell for $40, and Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition will cost $20. You can find them in select stores when they debut in the spring.

A ‘Valentine Phantom’ Has Been Covering Portland, Maine, in Paper Hearts for More Than 40 Years

Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Portland, Maine, has a secret admirer. Each Valentine's Day, flyers and banners with pink and red hearts appear in random spots around the city. According to Bangor Daily News, no one has claimed responsibility for the anonymous valentines in 41 years.

The first evidence of the so-called "Valentine Phantom" (who is sometimes referred to as the "Valentine Bandit") surfaced in Portland in 1976. Paper hearts were found plastering the streets on the holiday, with no clues indicating where they came from. The mystery only grew as the hearts returned every year on February 14. There's no pattern dictating where the hearts are placed; they've been found on everything from snowbanks to landmarks. Massive banners have also been hung up in prominent places. In the past decade, giant hearts have emblazoned the Portland Public Library and the ruins of Fort Gorges in Casco Bay.

In 2017, Bangor Daily News landed an exclusive interview with the Valentine Phantom. The mysterious force is actually a crew of Valentine's Day-lovers with connections to various sites and buildings around the city. The perpetrators declined to share their identities, telling the outlet, “Most people are dying to be in the paper. This is the opposite. This is not ego-driven.”

The Phantom has done more than spread good feelings to fellow Portlanders on Valentine's Day; they've sparked a nationwide trend. Similar anonymous heart flyers have appeared in Montpelier, Vermont, and Boulder, Colorado.

[h/t Bangor Daily News]

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