In Japan, Splintered Baseball Bats Are Turned Into Chopsticks

iStock.com/enterphoto
iStock.com/enterphoto

In Japan, a broken bowl or mug isn't necessarily destined for the nearest trash bin. Through the art of kintsugi, the shards are glued back together with a gold seal that calls attention to the cracks—the general idea being that flaws make something even more beautiful.

In a similar vein, many splintered baseball bats are also given a new lease on life in Japan. Bats that end up being broken by professional players are often turned into kattobashi: "a mash-up of the Japanese word for chopsticks and a baseball chant that translates as 'get a big hit,'" The New York Times explains. That's right—sports mementos that would typically be sold for upwards of $50 in the U.S. are turned into reusable chopsticks in Japan.

Each season, roughly 10,000 wooden bats are transformed into those ubiquitous eating utensils in an effort to cut down on waste and help preserve a threatened species of ash tree called the aodamo. Some bats are made from this material, although the practice is less common nowadays because the trees aren't readily available. Today, most are made from imported maple and white ash.

Sports teams in Japan weren't always so eco-conscious, though. The broken bats used to be burned or given away until chief executive Hyogoo Uratani of the Hyozaemon chopsticks company came along. With help from a friend who had been a pro baseball player, they convinced 12 teams to start recycling their bats. It's a mutually beneficial deal, with Hyozaemon paying a licensing fee to the teams, and the Nippon Professional Baseball organization donating funds each year to the nonprofit Aodamo Preservation Society.

They're also fun memorabilia to have on hand. A saw is used to break down the bats into smaller pieces, which are sanded into the shape of chopsticks. Team logos are imprinted on the wider part up top, and lastly they're coated in lacquer. For the ultimate baseball fan, it's a way to incorporate team pride into every aspect of daily life—even breakfast.

[The New York Times]

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

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Key West Has Installed Permanent Rainbow Crosswalks

In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
Maxvis/iStock via Getty Images

In 2015, Key West became the first place in Florida to install permanent rainbow crosswalks—a celebration of LGBTQ+ pride that reflected the city’s “One Human Family” motto. But a few years later, the city decided to repave its historic Duval Street, which required tearing up the four colorful paths at the intersection of Petronia Street.

The rainbow crosswalks finally returned this week—just in time for Pride Month—and they’re even more vibrant than before. The old ones were essentially regular white crosswalks with each empty space filled in with a different color, whereas the new paths feature long, colored stripes with a white stripe along the top and bottom edges.

According to NBC 6 South Florida, workers positioned the thermoplastic stripes on the street and attached them to the pavement below with heat from propane torches. Key West mayor Teri Johnson and other officials then commemorated the new landmarks, located in the heart of the city's entertainment district, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. (The ribbon was also rainbow colored, and all participants wore masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus.)

“The rainbow crosswalks mean that everybody is welcome, everybody is equal, everybody is recognized, and that we do really abide by the ‘One Human Family’ spirit,” Johnson said.

Key West isn’t the only place with permanent rainbow paths; as LGBTQ Nation reports, you can find them in San Francisco, West Hollywood, Seattle, Philadelphia, Toronto, and other cities, too. And while the small island city has postponed its Pride events until November due to the pandemic, some of the world's biggest Pride parades and festivals are simply moving the party online: Here are 10 events to check out this month.

[h/t NBC 6 South Florida]