10 Great Subscription Boxes for Everyone On Your Gift List

The Go Love Yourself Box, Cratejoy
The Go Love Yourself Box, Cratejoy

Most people have at least one person on their gift list who’s a little difficult to shop for. Whether they’re male or female, young or old, a beer lover or bookworm, you can probably find something they’ll like on Cratejoy.

Billing itself as the world’s only marketplace for subscription boxes, Cratejoy is an online retailer with over 1600 options to choose from. You can narrow down your search by clicking the "women," "men," or "kids" tabs at the top, among others, or by searching for specific interests. There’s something for foodies, fashionistas, bibliophiles, gamers, fitness enthusiasts, art lovers, pet owners, and more.

The subscription boxes, which charge by the month, vary widely in price. Some boxes charge as little as $6 per month, while the Robb Vices Membership (think fine wines, cigars, and gadgets) is one of the most expensive offerings at $159.95 per month. You can also choose whether you want to subscribe for one, three, six, or 12 months.

Ready to give a gift that keeps on giving year-round? Check out a few of our favorite options below.

1. Coffee and a Classic ($28.99): Comes with a classic novel, bookmarks, “bookish treats,” and some sort of beverage (you can choose coffee, tea, or cocoa).

The book Matilda with related merchandise
Coffee and a Classic, Cratejoy

2. Pooch Perks Premium Customized Dog Boxes ($19.99): Comes with five or six toys and treats for your pup.

3. Girls Can! Crate ($18.50): Contains activity books, games, and props to help children aged 5-10 learn about a different female role model each month.

4.The Go Love Yourself Box ($30): Includes a self-help book, self-care items, and additional resources (like journals and webinars).

5. Matter ($40): Billed as “part museum, part lab project,” each box includes a variety of scientific objects and natural history specimens.

6. GeekGear (About $32; ships from UK): Includes 6-10 pieces of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts merchandise, including a monthly T-shirt, accessories, wall art, and more.

7. Skulls Unlimited International, Inc. ($24.99): Their “Bonebox” comes with various animal bones, teeth, and claws—great for science teachers or collectors!

8. Finders Seekers Mysteries ($30): Filled with fun puzzles, mysteries, and cryptic messages for you (or your gift recipient) to solve.

A mystery box with various clues and puzzles inside
Finders Seekers Mysteries, Cratejoy

9. First Sip Brew Box ($24.99): While no beer is actually included (for legal reasons), each box comes with various merchandise from a different craft beer company.

10. MexiCrate ($5.99): Includes 10-15 items of Mexican candy and snacks.

The Best Place to Park at the Mall, According to Science

Diy13/iStock via Getty Images Plus
Diy13/iStock via Getty Images Plus

It’s Black Friday, and you are entering the battlefield: a mall parking lot. You’re determined to nail that doorbuster deal, and quantities are limited. The field is already full of other combatants. You must find the perfect parking spot.

Do you grab the first one you see, or drive as close to the mall as you can and hover? Or, do you choose a tactic that lies somewhere between?

Parking at the mall has long frustrated drivers and taxed the minds of traffic engineers—but after working on the problem for three years, physicists Sidney Redner of the Santa Fe Institute and Paul Krapivsky of Boston University have gotten closer to a winning strategy. “There are lots of studies of parking lots, but it’s just that they’re so complicated, you don’t get any insight into what’s actually happening,” Redner tells Mental Floss.

Redner and Krapivsky, whose work employs statistical physics to make sense of large systems, simplified the messy dynamics of a parking lot by modeling it with a one-dimensional grid of cells, each representing a parking space. They tested three simple, yet realistic, parking strategies using basic probability theory. Their model tested the following strategies to see which one resulted in least time spent walking and driving in the parking lot:

Meek Strategy: Meek drivers park in the first open space they see, however distant it is from the mall. As a result, they often spend the most time walking to and from the mall.

Prudent Strategy: Prudent drivers look for the first open spot but then keep driving toward the mall. They continue to drive until they see a parked car and then park in the best open spot between that first open spot and that first parked car. There may be a block of open spaces between the first open space and the first parked car. From that block of open spaces, they choose the one closest to the mall.

Optimistic Strategy: Optimistic drivers drive as close to the mall as possible and look for a parking space close to the entrance. If they see one, they grab it. If there are none, they backtrack and choose the first open space they see. Optimistic drivers probably spend the most time driving and the least time walking. In the worst-case scenario, they end up parking back where a meek driver would have parked.

Naturally cautious drivers are more likely to default to the meek mode, while aggressive drivers often use the optimistic strategy, well, aggressively. And most drivers have tried something like the prudent method.

So, which is your best bet in a crowded mall parking lot this holiday season?

In the experiments, the prudent strategy fared best, followed closely by the optimistic strategy. The meek strategy finished a distant third (“It’s hard to comprehend just how bad it is,” says Krapivsky, a self-described meek driver).

And even better: The more crowded the lot, the better the prudent strategy works, he adds.

One clear takeaway from the study is that meek drivers may want to ramp up their parking skills before going to the mall. “You don't want to park on the very outskirts of the lot, like a mile away from the stores. You want to go to the first place there’s an open spot and park somewhere in that first open area,” Redner says. They published their findings in the Journal of Statistical Mechanics [PDF].

The researchers say this is the best of the strategies they tested, but it has its limitations. It does not take into consideration competition among a sea of drivers all looking for parking spaces at the same time, and it doesn’t include (perhaps optimistically) the psychological aspects of operating a vehicle. “We are not rational when we are driving,” Krapivsky tells Mental Floss.

The researchers’ one-dimensional grid model also assumed that there would be one car at a time entering the lot through one entrance, unlike messier lots in the real world, where many cars enter from a multitude of entrances.

The optimal parking strategy, one that would best all others every time, has yet to be found. In their research, though, Redner and Krapivsky are homing in on one that integrates the more complicated aspects of parking.

For now, science says prudence is a virtue in the parking lot. And while the meek might inherit the Earth, they certainly won’t find the best parking space at the mall.

What Are the 12 Days of Christmas?

Antoninapotapenko/iStock via Getty Images
Antoninapotapenko/iStock via Getty Images

Everyone knows to expect a partridge in a pear tree from your true love on the first day of Christmas ... But when is the first day of Christmas?

You'd think that the 12 days of Christmas would lead up to the big day—that's how countdowns work, as any year-end list would illustrate—but in Western Christianity, "Christmas" actually begins on December 25 and ends on January 5. According to liturgy, the 12 days signify the time in between the birth of Christ and the night before Epiphany, which is the day the Magi visited bearing gifts. This is also called "Twelfth Night." (Epiphany is marked in most Western Christian traditions as happening on January 6, and in some countries, the 12 days begin on December 26.)

As for the ubiquitous song, it is said to be French in origin and was first printed in England in 1780. Rumors spread that it was a coded guide for Catholics who had to study their faith in secret in 16th-century England when Catholicism was against the law. According to the Christian Resource Institute, the legend is that "The 'true love' mentioned in the song is not an earthly suitor, but refers to God Himself. The 'me' who receives the presents refers to every baptized person who is part of the Christian Faith. Each of the 'days' represents some aspect of the Christian Faith that was important for children to learn."

In debunking that story, Snopes excerpted a 1998 email that lists what each object in the song supposedly symbolizes:

2 Turtle Doves = the Old and New Testaments
3 French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues
4 Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists
5 Golden Rings = the first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.
6 Geese A-laying = the six days of creation
7 Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments
8 Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes
9 Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit
10 Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments
11 Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles
12 Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

There is pretty much no historical evidence pointing to the song's secret history, although the arguments for the legend are compelling. In all likelihood, the song's "code" was invented retroactively.

Hidden meaning or not, one thing is definitely certain: You have "The Twelve Days of Christmas" stuck in your head right now.

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