New Orleans Hotel Offering $15,000 Stay to Past Guest Who Stole the ‘Most Outrageous’ Item

Little Koshka, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Little Koshka, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Anyone with a moral compass knows that stealing is bad, but what if you were rewarded for your sticky fingers? As Condé Nast Traveler reports, The Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana is offering a free seven-night stay in its Presidential Suite to the person who returns the “most outrageous” item stolen from the hotel in the past.

This unusual (and oddly specific) promotion is valued at $15,000. According to general manager Tod Chambers, the person who hands over the strangest stolen item will also receive private dinners prepared by the hotel’s executive chef, as well as spa services. The hotel is located near the French Quarter, and it would be an affordable way to vacation in a vibrant city.

Does this offer sound suspicious? They promise they won’t ask any questions, and they won’t have police officers waiting to arrest you in the lobby. The stolen item will even be returned to you when the promotion ends, if the guilt isn’t too much to bear.

The “giveback sweepstakes” is part of the hotel’s 125th anniversary celebration. The business has existed in different incarnations over the years—first as the Grunewald Hotel, then as the Roosevelt, then as a Fairmont property, and finally as the Roosevelt once again (though it's now part of the Waldorf Astoria family). Eligible items could have been swiped at any point in the hotel's history, and those items can be dropped off or mailed to the hotel’s marketing department (with this PDF form attached). The hotel says they will be displayed in lobby window cases and then returned to owners, if they wish.

According to Chambers, the stolen items are another way of celebrating the hotel’s heritage. “In a way, knowing they have something that reminds them of our Roosevelt in their own homes? Well, that leaves us flattered,” Chambers says. “We’d estimate nearly 700 of our logoed Sazerac glasses are ‘borrowed’ from the bar during the holiday season alone.”

So far, the hotel has received menus, postcards, a plate, stemware, a tablecloth, bud vases, and brass keys.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

Here’s How Much a 5-Star Hotel Will Cost You in 100 Popular Travel Destinations Around the World

The Burj Al Arab Hotel in Dubai
The Burj Al Arab Hotel in Dubai
iStock.com/Nikada

Sometimes, you don’t mind roughing it in a tent for the sake of a budget-friendly vacation. Other times, you might want to splurge on a nicer hotel with a buffet breakfast and room service. Enjoying the finer things in life doesn’t necessarily mean breaking the bank, though.

A chart spotted by Thrillist breaks down the cost of 5-star hotels in 100 popular destinations around the world. Travel site Asher & Lyric crunched the numbers, using data from TripAdvisor on the average cost of a weeknight stay at the five top-rated hotels in each destination. The analysis accounted for fluctuating costs from one season to the next, and the chart shows what you might expect to pay during the high season compared to other times of year.

Places like Aspen and the Cayman Islands are predictably among the areas with the priciest hotels, but other vacation spots are surprisingly affordable. Take Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, for instance. This city of skyscrapers is a popular luxury destination—it’s called the “City of Gold,” after all—but its 5-star hotels are the third- cheapest ones on the chart, preceded only by Chennai in India and Manila in the Philippines.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, you’d spend less money staying in a fancy hotel in New York City, Paris, or Rome during the high season than you’d pay to stay in Wyoming’s Jackson Hole. And if you’re looking to travel domestic, check out Las Vegas, Houston, and Atlanta. Of America's top destinations, these cities offer some of the cheapest 5-star hotels.

Scroll down to see the chart, and check out Asher & Lyric’s website for a detailed breakdown of their findings, including their top hotel picks.

How Much 5-Star Hotels Cost in the Top 100 Destinations Around the World - AsherFergusson.com - Infographic
Researched and developed by Asher & Lyric Fergusson

[h/t Thrillist]

Behr Will Pay Someone $10,000 to Travel the U.S. and Canada in Search of New Paint Colors

Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
iStock.com/RiverNorthPhotography

Want to add a bit of color and excitement to your life? Behr has just the opportunity for you. The company wants to pay a “Color Explorer” $10,000 to visit vibrant destinations across the U.S. and Canada in search of new hues that will ultimately be turned into actual Behr paints.

“The Behr Color Explorer will kayak the glacial blues of Lake Louise in Banff [Alberta, Canada], people-watch at a vibrant music festival, take in the bold exteriors of Charleston’s Rainbow Row, and experience many more moments of positively pigmented wanderlust in between,” Behr writes in its job description.

Throughout their trip, the Color Explorer will take field notes and plenty of photos, and document their experiences on Behr’s blog and social media. After seeing all there is to see, this person will head to the company’s headquarters in Orange County, California, to work with Behr's marketing team on naming the new colors they uncovered.

Behr's paint names tend to range from the alliterative (see: “Bali Bliss” and “Barely Brown”) to the poetic (“Moth’s Wing”) to the straightforward but still somehow evocative (“Wheat Bread” and “Swiss Coffee”). The company's color of the year for 2019 is called Blueprint.

The ideal Color Explorer will be adventurous, interested in color, and knowledgeable about the latest trends, according to Behr.

In addition to providing a $10,000 stipend, the company will also cover all travel expenses, accommodation, and experiences. Would-be explorers can apply for the gig on Behr’s website by writing a short description of the color that inspires them most before the May 15 deadline. Applicants must be at least 21 years old and residents of the U.S. or Canada, and they must also have a valid passport.

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