How to Scan Documents Using Your iPhone's Notes App

iStock.com/Sidekick
iStock.com/Sidekick

Printing, signing, and scanning documents are annoying tasks that feel like they should be obsolete in the digital era. But whether you're filling out forms for a new job or filing your taxes, handling physical paperwork is sometimes unavoidable. There's no shortcut for printing out documents, but as long as you own an iPhone, you can scan those documents easily using your Notes app, PopSugar reports.

To scan documents on your iPhone, go the Home screen and open Notes. Tap the + icon at the bottom of the page, and select Scan Documents from the list of the options. This should launch your phone's camera. When the camera detects the document you want to scan, it will highlight it in yellow on the screen. Press the capture button to "scan" the document and save it to your phone.

After saving the image file, you can use it just as you would a normal scanned document. Open it in your Mail app and attach it to an email, or send it in a text message. Whatever you need it for, you can take comfort in knowing that you didn't have to figure out how the clunky scanner in your office works to get it done.

The iPhone is filled with hidden features, like a virtual magnifying glass and a handy backspace shortcut for the calculator. Here are more useful things you might not know your iPhone can do.

[h/t PopSugar]

Sprint Will Fix the Cracked Screen on Your Samsung Galaxy for $49—Even if They're Not Your Carrier

SergeyChayko/iStock via Getty Images
SergeyChayko/iStock via Getty Images

In a move designed to engender some consumer goodwill, phone service carrier Sprint recently announced that it will repair cracked Samsung Galaxy smartphone screens for a set price of $49. And this time, the fine print works in the consumer’s favor. You don’t need to be a Sprint phone plan customer in order to take advantage of the deal.

The program’s website has the details, but it’s a relatively straightforward offer. If you have a damaged Galaxy screen, you can have it repaired regardless of your carrier through February 9, 2020. (The newest Galaxy S10 model is not included in the offer, but it should still be under warranty.)

Here are the eligible phones:

  • Samsung Galaxy S7
  • Samsung Galaxy S8
  • Samsung Galaxy S8+
  • Samsung Galaxy S9
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
  • Samsung Galaxy Note8

According to Android Authority, this is actually a pretty good deal as Samsung screen repairs can cost you over $200. You’ll have to take the still-working phone into a Sprint store with repair services in order to take advantage of the offer. (And presumably, be tempted into switching to Sprint if you’re not already a customer.) If the device cannot be repaired, Sprint will give you $150 in store credit toward a new phone. You can find a list of repair locations by here.

[h/t Engadget]

Scam Alert: A FedEx Tracking Notification Text Wants to Steal Your Credit Card Number

interstid/iStock via Getty Images
interstid/iStock via Getty Images

Thanks to moment-by-moment tracking software offered by delivery services like FedEx, UPS, and the post office, consumers can keep tabs on their packages before they're even delivered. We’ve grown so accustomed to getting notification texts that it might be easy to let a bogus one slip by.

According to How-To Geek, that could prove to be an expensive mistake. The site is reporting that a scam currently making the rounds involves a fraudulent text notification of an impending FedEx package. The message is prompting recipients to “set delivery preferences” for the delivery. When smartphone users click on the link in the message, they’re directed to what looks like an Amazon satisfaction survey. After completing the survey, users are offered a free gift and then asked to remit their credit card information to pay $6.99 for shipping. This also triggers a monthly subscription charge of $98.95.

Due to the deluge of solicitations for customer surveys prompted by businesses, this is a clever bit of misdirection. Needless to say, it’s also not a legitimate offer. Amazon is unlikely to ever route you to a new URL for a “free gift.” If you’re unsure whether you have a package on the way, it’s a good idea to navigate directly to the FedEx or shipper website to check. It’s also best to block the incoming number to opt out of any future texts offering to separate you from your money.

[h/t How-To Geek]

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