LEGO Is Releasing Five New Harry Potter Sets

LEGO
LEGO

LEGO has given fans many opportunities to enter the world of Harry Potter, letting them explore the Great Hall of Hogwarts castle, play with the Hogwarts Express, and even build their own Harry Potter characters. Now, LEGO is expanding its Harry Potter universe with five new sets inspired by the books and movies.

Three of the new sets recreate scenes from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. One features the triple-decker Knight Bus, and another includes Harry, Ron, and Hermione rescuing Buckbeak the Hippogriff outside Hagrid's hut. LEGO fans will also be able to recreate the climax of Prisoner of Azkaban with a set that comes with Harry's stag Patronus along with minifigures of Harry, Sirius Black, and two Dementors.

Harry Potter LEGO set.
LEGO

Harry Potter LEGO set.
LEGO

The other two sets borrow imagery from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. In the Hungarian Horntail Triwizard Challenge, Harry battles a dragon on his broomstick, with Cedric Diggory, Viktor Krum, and Fleur Delacour looking on. LEGO also recreates the Yule Ball with a set that includes the Hogwarts clock tower and the characters dressed up in formal wear.

Harry Potter LEGO set.
LEGO

The five sets appear on shelves August 1, and they'll range in price from $20 to $90. Here are some more amazing LEGO sets you can build in the meantime.

Harry Potter LEGO set.
LEGO

Dominate Game Night With Godzilla-Themed Monopoly and Jenga

Usaopoly
Usaopoly

Competitive board games have a tendency to bring out players' monstrous sides, and later this year, you'll be able to embrace those destructive impulses with Jenga and Monopoly games inspired by Godzilla.

Both products featuring Japan's iconic mutant menace are a collaboration between games publisher USAopoly (also known as The Op) and entertainment company Toho International, CBR.com reports. The first one, dubbed Monopoly: Godzilla, is billed as a "city-terrorizing twist on the classic board game." The properties available for conquering include Monster Island, Goro’s Workshop, and Kitakami Lake. Instead of the classic game pieces, players use tokens of monsters like Mothra, Rodan, and Godzilla to dominate the board.

The second game pairs so perfectly with Godzilla that it may rival the classic version. In Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition, the block tower resembles a skyscraper taken from downtown Tokyo, and it comes with a cardboard cutout of Godzilla unleashing a beam of atomic breath. With every role of the die, Godzilla moves along the "approach track," increasing the number of blocks removed each turn and hastening the building's destruction.

Godzilla Jenga.
Usaopoly

Monopoly: Godzilla will sell for $40, and Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition will cost $20. You can find them in select stores when they debut in the spring.

A ‘Valentine Phantom’ Has Been Covering Portland, Maine, in Paper Hearts for More Than 40 Years

Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Portland, Maine, has a secret admirer. Each Valentine's Day, flyers and banners with pink and red hearts appear in random spots around the city. According to Bangor Daily News, no one has claimed responsibility for the anonymous valentines in 41 years.

The first evidence of the so-called "Valentine Phantom" (who is sometimes referred to as the "Valentine Bandit") surfaced in Portland in 1976. Paper hearts were found plastering the streets on the holiday, with no clues indicating where they came from. The mystery only grew as the hearts returned every year on February 14. There's no pattern dictating where the hearts are placed; they've been found on everything from snowbanks to landmarks. Massive banners have also been hung up in prominent places. In the past decade, giant hearts have emblazoned the Portland Public Library and the ruins of Fort Gorges in Casco Bay.

In 2017, Bangor Daily News landed an exclusive interview with the Valentine Phantom. The mysterious force is actually a crew of Valentine's Day-lovers with connections to various sites and buildings around the city. The perpetrators declined to share their identities, telling the outlet, “Most people are dying to be in the paper. This is the opposite. This is not ego-driven.”

The Phantom has done more than spread good feelings to fellow Portlanders on Valentine's Day; they've sparked a nationwide trend. Similar anonymous heart flyers have appeared in Montpelier, Vermont, and Boulder, Colorado.

[h/t Bangor Daily News]

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