Coolhaus Is Serving French’s Mustard Ice Cream This Week In Honor of National Mustard Day

French's
French's

This Saturday is National Mustard Day, and condiment brand French’s is reinforcing its “Not From France” campaign by celebrating in a quintessentially American way: with a seemingly disgusting food mashup. According to a press release, the company has partnered with edgy ice cream brand Coolhaus to bring you mustard—yes, mustard—ice cream.

If you live in New York City or Los Angeles, you can try it in person. The Coolhaus shop in Culver City, Los Angeles, will carry it from August 2 to August 4 and again from August 9 to August 11. In New York, you can catch the French’s Mustard Ice Cream truck at select street corners throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Hamptons from August 1 to August 3. And, if you thought you could pass off your frankly alarming flavor selection as just a deeply golden French vanilla, think again—the ice cream is served in a festive cup plastered with the words “mustard ice cream.” It also comes with a pretzel cookie to help temper the tang.

French's mustard ice cream
French's

For those of you who find your taste buds tingling expectantly at the idea of such an innovative confectionery abomination, French’s has published a mustard ice cream recipe that you can whip up at home, wherever you live.

The recipe may shed some light on just how mustard-y the ice cream actually is. It contains 2 cups of heavy cream, 1 cup of sweetened condensed milk, 1/4 cup each of whole milk and light corn syrup, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 1 tablespoon of vanilla extract, and only 1/4 cup of mustard. Its secret ingredient is one entire teaspoon of yellow food dye (plus a single drop of green coloring). So although the ice cream looks intense, it probably tastes relatively mild.

Who knows? Maybe mustard ice cream will join the ranks of other bizarre-yet-admittedly-delicious food fusions like French fries in milkshakes, maple syrup with bacon, and pineapple on pizza. Coolhaus CEO and founder Natasha Case is optimistic. “As lovers of sweet-meets-savory, pure ingredients, and unique creations,” she said in the press release, “we are incredibly excited to be collaborating with French’s Mustard in creating this one-of-a-kind product. It’s been so fun to explore this classic condiment in a whole new way and create an unforgettable thoughtfully-crafted ice cream flavor with an All-American taste.”

What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?

iStock
iStock

For carbohydrate lovers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal quite like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say stuffing, though. They say dressing. In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. Dressing seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while stuffing is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it filling, which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If stuffing stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to HuffPost, it may have been because Southerners considered the word stuffing impolite, and therefore never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

The Reason You Should Never Rinse a Turkey

jax10289/iStock via Getty Images
jax10289/iStock via Getty Images

There are many misconceptions surrounding your Thanksgiving turkey, but none is more dangerous than the turkey-washing myth. Raw poultry can contain dangerous microbes like Salmonella, and it's not uncommon for home cooks to rinse their meat under cool water in an effort to wash away these pathogens. The intention may be admirable, but this is a worse turkey sin than overcooking your bird or carving it before letting it rest. According to AOL, rinsing a raw turkey with water is more likely to make you and your dinner guests sick than not cleaning it at all.

When you wash a turkey in the sink, there's no guarantee that all of the nasty stuff on the outside of it is going down the drain. In fact, the only thing rinsing does is spread potentially harmful microbes around. In addition to getting bacteria on you hands and clothes, rinsing can contaminate countertops, sink handles, and even the surrounding air.

There are three main ways to lower your chances of contracting Salmonella when dealing with raw turkey: Thaw your bird in the fridge, minimize contact with it before it goes into the oven, and give it plenty of time to cook once it's in there. For the second part, that means setting aside time to pat your turkey dry, remove the excess fat and skin, and season it without handling anything else. To reduce the risk of cross-contamination, wash your hands frequently and wash the plates, knives, and other tools that touched the turkey before using them again. You should also cook your stuffing outside the turkey rather than shoving it inside the cavity and creating a Salmonella bomb.

Once the safety aspect is taken care of, you can focus on making your turkey taste as delicious as possible. Here are some tips from professional chefs on making your starring dish shine this Thanksgiving.

[h/t AOL]

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