Arrived, Baby Yoda Merchandise Has

Disney
Disney

The Mandalorian is a new Star Wars series that follows a bounty hunter in the era in the between the events of Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. But more importantly, it's the show that introduced the world to Baby Yoda. The impossibly cute character—apparently a member of the same species as Yoda—has already inspired countless memes and moved Werner Herzog to tears. Now, after an agonizing two-week wait, Baby Yoda merchandise is finally available to buy online, TechCrunch reports.

Disney wasn't prepared for the reaction to Baby Yoda (officially known as The Child) when The Mandalorian premiered on its new streaming service, Disney+, on November 12. Director Jon Favreau reportedly asked the company to hold off on making merchandise with the character for as long as possible in order to keep its appearance a surprise. That meant for the past two weeks, anyone with an urgent need for Baby Yoda swag had to shop for fan-made gear on sites like Etsy.

Now the official Baby Yoda merchandise from Disney is finally here—unfortunately, it's failing to meet to fans' expectations. The Baby Yoda products now available from the online Disney store feature the same image of the character slapped onto totes, T-shirts, and phone cases. Some are paired with The Mandalorian logo and one comes with the label "The Child" in a nondescript font. Adorable plush dolls or graphic tees with mashups of baby talk and Yoda-speak are nowhere to be found.

T-shirt with Baby Yoda.
Disney

If you're hoping to buy some Baby Yoda merchandise for the holidays, you should probably hold out a little longer. Disney promises to have more products available through its website, stores, and parks before the shopping season is over. Until then, you can buy the official items from ShopDisney for $15 to $25 apiece.

[h/t TechCrunch]

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

Pre-Order the Baby Yoda Funko Pop of Your Dreams

Funko Pop
Funko Pop

Since Baby Yoda—officially known as "The Child"—made its surprise debut on the new Disney+ show The Mandalorian, fans have been obsessed with this incredibly cute creature, inspiring countless memes and a bunch of merchandise along the way. But while the initial offering of official Baby Yoda merch may have left a little to be desired, things are starting to look up with the announcement that the character is getting the inevitable Funko Pop treatment.

Unfortunately, fans will have to wait until spring of 2020 for the item to ship, but you can pre-order both the standard ($9) and life-size ($30) Baby Yoda Funkos at Walmart. You can also find them at Hot Topic, with the regular size going for $12 and the 10-inch version for $39.

If you simply can’t wait to have Baby Yoda merchandise in your life, here are some more items that will arrive sooner.

The Mandalorian and The Child 500-Piece Jigsaw Puzzle; $11

Baby Yoda puzzle
Buffalo Games / Amazon

According to Amazon, this 500-piece puzzle will be released on December 30, and it also comes with a bonus poster, so you can hang a picture up of Baby Yoda anywhere.

Buy it: Amazon

Baby Yoda Decal Sticker; $8

Baby Yoda sticker
NG / Amazon

Complete your water bottle, lunchbox, or laptop with some precious Baby Yoda love.

Buy it: Amazon

Baby Yoda Mug; $17

Baby Yoda mug
M&R / Amazon

This mug not only features an adorable illustration of the The Child in his cool sci-fi crib, but it's also microwave-safe.

Buy it: Amazon

Baby Yoda PopSockets Grip and Stand for Phones and Tablets; $17

Baby Yoda phone holder
Star Wars / Amazon

What’s better than being able to have collapsible grip that provides a secure hold for texting, calling, photos, and selfies? Being able to do so with an adorable photo of The Child.

Buy it: Amazon

The Child T-Shirt; $22

Baby Yoda t-shit
Hot Topic

This gray tee features a photo of Baby Yoda in his tiny poncho. If you're a bit more particular about the photos, there are also other designs from which to choose.

Buy it: Hot Topic

Baby Yoda Men’s Hoodie; $35

Baby Yoda Hoodie
Hot Topic

Make sure you stay warm with this 50 percent cotton hoodie. As with the tees, there are multiple designs to choose from.

Buy it: Hot Topic

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

License to Bird: Meet the Real James Bond

American ornithologist James Bond, circa 1974.
American ornithologist James Bond, circa 1974.

On January 4, 1900, a child was born in Philadelphia. His name was Bond. James Bond. He would not grow up to be a globe-trotting, license-to-kill-carrying playboy spy like the other James Bond. Instead, he became an ornithologist, and lived a fairly quiet, normal life—until someone borrowed his name.  

Bond lived in New Hampshire and England while growing up, and developed an accent that a colleague described [PDF] as an “amalgam of New England, British, and upper-class Philadelphian.” After graduating from Cambridge, Bond returned to the U.S. to work as a banker, but his childhood interests in science and natural history spurred him to quit soon after and join an expedition to the Amazon to collect biological specimens for Philadelphia’s Academy of Natural Sciences.

After that, and with no formal training in the field, he started working as an ornithologist at the Academy, and was “among the last of a traditional museum breed, the independently wealthy, nonsalaried curator, who lacked advanced university degrees.” Working at the museum, Bond became an authority on the bird species of the Caribbean, and his 1936 book, Birds of the West Indies, was considered the definitive guide to the region’s birds at the time. 

Despite his many scientific accomplishments—which included dozens of papers about Caribbean and New England birds, more books and field guides, numerous medals and awards and other researchers using the term “Bond’s Line” to refer to the boundary that separates Caribbean fauna by their origin—that book would be what catapulted Bond, or at least his name, to international fame.

In 1961, Bond was reading a London newspaper’s review of the latest edition of his book and found eyebrow-raising references to handguns, kinky sex, and other elements of a life that sounded very unlike his. He and his wife Mary quickly learned that another James Bond was the hero of a series of novels by Ian Fleming, which were popular in the UK but just gaining notice in the U.S. Mary wrote to Fleming to jokingly chastise him for stealing her husband’s name for his “rascal” character. 

Fleming replied to explain himself: He was a birdwatcher and when he was living in Jamaica beginning work on his first spy novel, Birds of the West Indies was one of his bird “bibles.” He wanted his main character to have an ordinary, unassuming name, and when he was trying to drum one up, he remembered the author of the book he turned to so often. “It struck me that this name, brief, unromantic and yet very masculine, was just what I needed and so James Bond II was born,” Fleming wrote to Mary. (Fleming later called “James Bond” the “dullest name I’ve ever heard.”)

Fleming told Mary that he understood if they were angry at the theft of Bond’s name, and suggested a trade. “In return I can only offer your James Bond unlimited use of the name Ian Fleming for any purpose he may think fit,” he wrote. “Perhaps one day he will discover some particularly horrible species of bird which he would like to christen in an insulting fashion.” 

He also invited the Bonds to his home in Jamaica, which they took him up on a few years later. During the Bonds’ visit, Fleming gave James a copy of his latest novel, You Only Live Twice, inscribed with the message “To the real James Bond from the thief of his identity.”

For the next few decades, until his death at the age of 89, Bond’s famous namesake caused the ornithologist a few minor annoyances. Once, he was supposedly stopped at the airport because officials thought his passport was a fake, and the occasional bank teller would likewise think the same of his checks and refuse to cash them.

Young women would often prank call the Bond house late at night asking to speak to 007, to which Mary would reply: “Yes, James is here. But this is Pussy Galore and he's busy now."

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