Though often described in blanket terms, each Millennial's experience varies greatly. And it isn't just their age ranges and relationships to technology that divide the generation. According to one expert, American Millennials (anyone born between the years 1981 and 1996) fall into two subgroups based on their levels of success: "me-llennials" and "mega-llennials."

Center for Generational Kinetics president Jason Dorsey, who researches Millennials, told Business Insider that life paths and financial status may be a better indicator of the differences in members of this generation than the years they were born. According to him, the first group feels behind in their careers and other areas of adult life, while the second group feels right on track.

For the first group, he coined the term "me-llennials." These are Millennials who fit the common narrative surrounding the generation: They're dealing with stagnant wages and career paths, unaffordable housing, and mountains of student loan debt. The homeownership rate of Millennials today is 8 percent lower than that of Baby Boomers at the same age. National student loan debt, meanwhile, reached a record high of $1.5 trillion in 2019.

Millennials belonging to the second group are at a much different place in life. These so-called "mega-llennials" manage their bills, feel satisfied with their careers, and are overall more financially stable than other members of their generation. For these reasons, mega-llennials may not relate to the typical millennial experience that's often reported.

These trends indicate that the story of Millennials' progress is more complicated than it may seem. While the combination of steep bills and low wages may be worse for young people today than it was for older generations, the Millennials who aren't dealing with those hardships have an even greater advantage over their peers. The gap between these subgroups will only get wider: Millennials are set to inherit trillions in wealth over the coming decades.

[h/t Business Insider]