The Reason Why Daylight Saving Time Begins at 2 a.m.

Daylight saving time has been erasing 2 a.m. on and off since 1918.
Daylight saving time has been erasing 2 a.m. on and off since 1918.
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If you happen to be awake and staring at your smartphone in the very early hours of the morning on Sunday, March 8, you’ll have the small pleasure of watching the time jump right from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. Daylight saving time (DST), of course, is the reason you’re losing an hour of sleep—but why that hour, specifically?

As TIME explains, the United States first adopted DST in 1918 as a way to conserve energy during World War I, following the lead of both England and Germany. When choosing exactly when to make the switch, officials were looking for an hour that could easily disappear without wreaking havoc on people’s schedules across the nation. Since no Amtrak trains departed New York City on Sundays at 2 a.m., losing that hour seemed a little less consequential than any other.

“Sunday morning at 2 a.m. was when [a time change] would interrupt the least amount of train travel around the country,” Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time, told TIME.

The United States didn’t stick with daylight saving time after 1918—partially because so many farmers opposed it—but it did resurrect the tradition during World War II, and Congress formalized the practice in 1966 with the Uniform Time Act (which also created the time zones we use today).

The reason DST’s 2 a.m. start time has remained standard through the years isn’t just because it prevents confusion among late-night train passengers. Considering that most bars and restaurants are closed by then, and early shift-workers won’t be awake yet, it’s a pretty quiet hour across the board.

Wondering how daylight saving time will affect sunrise and sunset times in your area? Here’s a map for that.

[h/t TIME]

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The Reason Stone Crabs Are So Expensive

Thomas Hawk, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Thomas Hawk, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Many people associate lobster with fine dining, but the stone crab may be the true king of fancy shellfish. Per pound, the crab is the most expensive seafood consumed in the United States. The crustacean is highly sought after for its delicate, succulent taste, but that's not the only reason for its high price tag. The cost of stone crabs comes from the way the creature is harvested.

To prevent their population from being wiped out, stone crab fishing is strictly regulated. In Florida, where 98 percent of all stone crabs sold in the country originate, the crabs can only be harvested from October 15 through May 1. That's why stone crab season lasts half the year at markets and restaurants.

Stone crab harvesting isn't as simple as hauling a box of live crabs to shore. Fishermen are only allowed to collect one claw from each crab they catch. The claw must be at least 2.75 inches long, and it can't belong to an egg-bearing female.

Once the claw is broken off, the live crab is thrown back into the ocean, where it will have a chance to continue mating and reproducing. Stone crabs can survive with one claw, and it takes them about a year to regrow the lost appendage. That means there's a good chance the owner of the stone crab claw you ordered is still crawling through the ocean when your dinner arrives.

Due to these sustainability practices, one pound of stone crab takes more time and effort to harvest than most other crustaceans. The crab can sell anywhere from $30 to $60 per pound depending on the claw size. And thanks to high demand from seafood lovers, that price likely won't go down anytime soon.