What Does ALDI Stand For, Anyway?

Sadly, ALDI doesn't stand for “Awesome Lunch and Dinner Items” or “Always Loving Discounts, Inc.”
Sadly, ALDI doesn't stand for “Awesome Lunch and Dinner Items” or “Always Loving Discounts, Inc.”
ALDI

The ALDI emblazoned in big, block letters on signs around the world has come to stand for stress-free, affordable grocery shopping—but what does it literally stand for?

Considering it’s almost always spelled in all-caps, ALDI gives off a decidedly acronymic vibe; perhaps you thought it abbreviated “Awesome Lunch and Dinner Items,” or “Always Loving Discounts, Inc.” In reality, the name is a truncated version of just two words: Albrecht-Diskont, or, in English, Albrecht’s Discount. (So if you assumed the word discount was part of the equation, give yourself a well-earned pat on the back.)

As Reader’s Digest reports, Albrecht’s Discount began as a single grocery store founded by Anna Albrecht in 1913 in Essen, Germany. Ownership passed to her sons, Karl and Theo, in 1948, and they soon developed it into a large, family-run franchise. By 1952, there were more than 100 locations in operation, and the first U.S. store opened in Iowa in 1976.

By that time, Albrecht-Diskont had been shortened to Aldi, keeping only the first two letters of each word. We don’t exactly know how that decision was made, but we do know when it happened—in 1961, when the brothers argued over the sale of cigarettes in their stores. According to The New York Times, they split the company into Aldi Süd, which Karl ran in southern Germany, and Aldi Nord, which Theo ran in the northern part of the country. As their business grew, Karl’s jurisdiction included Britain, Australia, and the U.S., while Theo covered all of Europe. Sometime during that expansion, stores came to be known simply as “ALDI.”

If you’re looking to call up your local ALDI and ask for more details, however, you probably won’t be able to find a phone number—here’s why.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

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Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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When Does a President’s Term Officially End?

President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, leave the White House after President Ronald Reagan's inauguration ceremony in 1981.
President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, leave the White House after President Ronald Reagan's inauguration ceremony in 1981.
Clawson, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

You may be aware that newly elected U.S. presidents take office sometime in January—maybe you even know the inauguration occurs on January 20, specifically. What you might not realize is that it’s technically illegal for a president who’s leaving office to continue serving after that date. As the Twentieth Amendment states, “the terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January … and the terms of their successors shall then begin.”

In other words, a presidential term is exactly four years long, down to the hour. In the three cases where January 20 fell on a Sunday (since the 20th Amendment went into effect), the president took the oath of office in a private ceremony on that day, and the public inauguration was held the following day.

Though the four-year term limit has been in the Constitution from the very beginning, January 20 wasn’t always the start and end date. Until 1933, it was March 4. After the Constitutional Convention adopted the Constitution in September 1788, the old government—the Confederation Congress—ceased operations on March 4, 1789 and the Congress of the United States started running things. Getting up to speed took a little longer than expected, and George Washington didn’t end up getting sworn in until April 30. As Binghamton University history professor and provost Donald Nieman writes for The Conversation, March 4 became the official Inauguration Day starting with Washington’s second term.

A painting of George Washington's second inauguration on March 4, 1793, by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris.The Foundation Press, Inc., Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division // No Known Restrictions on Publication

By the early 20th century, the long delay between officials winning an election and actually starting the job was causing issues—mostly in Congress. Members of Congress were elected in November, but their first session didn’t start until the following December, a whole 13 months later. Furthermore, their second session, which started the December after that, could only last until their terms ended on March 4. So, in the 1930s, Congress passed the 20th Amendment, declaring that congressional terms would begin and end on January 3, about two months after the election.

The president’s inauguration day got shifted to January, too, and the amendment also explained what would happen if a president hadn’t been chosen by that date. The sitting president wouldn’t just stay in office by default—instead, Congress could either appoint someone to serve in the interim, or it could decide on another way to select someone. That person would serve “until a President or Vice president shall have qualified.” Since that’s never happened before, we don’t know exactly what the process would look like.

As for what the president actually does during their last days in office, it’s not all long lunches and lazy walks around the well-kept White House grounds. There are usually plenty of eleventh-hour pardons to make, and it’s tradition for the president to pen a letter to their successor. President Barack Obama also sent a heartfelt email to his whole White House staff, thanking them for their years of support and encouraging them to continue working to uphold democracy.

[h/t The Conversation]