To Avoid Grocery Shopping, Quarantined Americans Are Reviving Wartime-Era Victory Gardens

Zbynek Pospisil/iStock via Getty Images
Zbynek Pospisil/iStock via Getty Images

For many people practicing social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, the supermarket is the one place where it's practically impossible to avoid crowds. When they do brave the stores, shoppers may struggle to find what they're looking for, with panic buyers clearing shelves of everything from pasta to produce. Though the circumstances are different, citizens across the country are responding to the novel coronavirus outbreak by reviving a trend from the First and Second World Wars. As The New York Times reports, victory gardens are making a comeback.

Victory gardens started in 1917 as a way to supplement the commercial farming disrupted by World War I. As farmers became soldiers and farms became battlefields in Europe, the U.S. agricultural industry suddenly found itself responsible for feeding its own citizens as well as its allies abroad. Encouraging people to plant crops in any available space they could find—including rooftops, parks, backyards, empty lots, and fire escapes—was a way to lighten the burden.

The U.S. government formed the National War Garden Commission weeks before joining the war. Over the next couple of years, pamphlets were distributed to citizens showing them which seeds to plant and how to protect them from pests and diseases. One booklet read “The War Garden of 1918 must become the Victory Garden of 1919.”

Thanks to the effort, 3 million new gardens were cultivated in America in 1917 and 5.2 million appeared in 1918. The initiative resurfaced during World War II, and again, it was a huge success. At its peak, home and community gardens were producing nearly 40 percent of all fresh vegetables in the country.

For more than 70 years, victory gardens only existed as a footnote in history books, but now, they're seeing a resurgence. The U.S. isn't at war, and as of now there's no risk of the country running out of food, but the chaos and fear surrounding trips to the grocery stores are inspiring many people to turn to their own backyards. As many industries are struggling, seed companies are seeing a spike in business. Organizations dedicated to gardening are also seeing the trends. Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York normally builds about 10 community gardens outside homes, schools, and churches a year. But since the start of the novel coronavirus crisis, they've received 50 requests for community gardens.

A home garden is only useful in times of national hardship if it actually produces something. If you're interested in building a sustainable home garden and limiting your trips to the supermarket, here are some easy plants to start with and gardening mistakes to avoid.

[h/t The New York Times]

Blue Apron’s Memorial Day Sale Will Save You $60 On Your First Three Boxes

Scott Eisen/Getty Images
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

If you’ve gone through all the recipes you had bookmarked on your phone and are now on a first-name basis with the folks at the local pizzeria, it might be time to introduce a new wrinkle into your weekly dinner menu. But instead of buying loads of groceries and cookbooks to make your own meal, you can just subscribe to a service like Blue Apron, which will deliver all the ingredients and instructions you need for a unique dinner.

And if you start your subscription before May 26, you can save $20 on each of your first three weekly boxes from the company. That means that whatever plan you choose—two or four meals a week, vegetarian or the Signature plan—you’ll save $60 in total.

With the company’s Signature plan, you’ll get your choice of meat, fish, and Beyond foods, along with options for diabetes-friendly and Weight Watchers-approved dishes. The vegetarian plan loses the meat, but still allows you to choose from a variety of dishes like General Tso's tofu and black bean flautas.

To get your $60 off, head to the Blue Apron website and click “Redeem Offer” at the top of the page to sign up.

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Chuck E. Cheese Disguises Itself as Pasqually's Pizza & Wings on Delivery Apps

gsheldon/iStock via Getty Images
gsheldon/iStock via Getty Images

Chuck E. Cheese is best known for its arcades, ball pits, and birthday parties—things that have become health hazards during the COVID-19 pandemic. The restaurant part of the chain is less beloved, but it's the only component of the business that's still allowed to operate under some capacity. To keep revenue flowing while doors are closed, Chuck E. Cheese has transitioned to delivery—but you won't see its name on GrubHub or Seamless. As Food & Wine reports, the chain is delivering food under the name Pasqually's Pizza & Wings to broaden its appeal.

Reddit user u/KendallNeff uncovered the sneaky rebranding after she placed an order from what she thought was a local pizzeria in Philadelphia. When her food arrived, it looked suspiciously familiar. A text to her delivery person revealed that the pizza had come from a Chuck E. Cheese location with signs for "Pasqually's Pizza & Wings" in windows. The Redditor did some research of her own and found that Pasqually's and Chuck E. Cheese shared an address, and that Pasqually P. Pieplate was the name of a fictional chef in Chuck E. Cheese's cast of characters.

Chuck E. Cheese denies any deception on their part. In a statement to Food & Wine, the company said that while Pasqually's "shares kitchen space with the Chuck E. Cheese restaurant," it's a distinct offshoot of the brand. They also claim that the product sold under the Pasqually's label "is a different pizza that features a thicker crust and extra sauce," compared to what's served in the arcades.

One way to avoid falling for misleading names in delivery apps is to look up restaurants and call them directly. This saves small business from paying extra fees, and it gives you a better idea of what you're getting. Of course, if you're feeling nostalgic for Chuck E. Cheese, a taste of their pizza at home may be just what you need—and now you know how to find them.

[h/t Food & Wine]