7 Movies That Sent People Running Out of Theaters

Walt Disney Pictures
Walt Disney Pictures

The Lumière brothers were said to have caused quite a stir when their 50-second short film, The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat, premiered in Paris in 1896. Unaccustomed to the sensory experience of moving footage, audiences experienced a jolt of panic when an oncoming train seemed to be speeding directly toward them.

Over the years, the story has morphed into people fleeing from the theater entirely, though that’s not likely. Since the Lumières, however, many filmmakers have been successful in driving moviegoers out of their seats. The latest addition: Robert Zemeckis, whose film The Walk is quickly becoming notorious for its dizzying depiction of wire-walker Philippe Petit’s journey between the Twin Towers in 1974. The perspective of Petit more than 1300 feet in the air is reportedly too much for some to take. Here are seven other films that couldn’t keep audiences in the dark for long.   

1. THE EXORCIST (1973)

Lines wrapped around the block for the film adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s bestselling novel about a young woman possessed by a demon. They quickly realized it was the cinematic equivalent of a hot pepper: something to be endured rather than enjoyed. News footage like the compilation above portrayed stricken filmgoers who had fled screening rooms out of sheer terror; one fainted in the lobby. “I just found it really horrible and had to come out,” one says. “I couldn’t take it anymore.” By the time the film premiered in London, ambulances were parked outside.

2. THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1998)

Launching the found-footage genre with an economical story about filmmakers threatened by an unseen force, The Blair Witch Project was a sizable box office hit and remains one of the most profitable films ever ($22,000 budget, $240 million gross). But the documentary-style format, with actors jogging or falling over with a camera in hand, prompted waves of people getting motion sickness in aisles, lobbies, and bathrooms. The Associated Press reported Atlanta-area theaters were on puke patrol for most of opening weekend. “Someone threw up in the men’s restroom, the women’s restroom, and in the hallway,” said a theater manager. In Cambridge, Massachusetts, another theater manager made announcements before screenings to please vomit outside of the screening room.

By the time Cloverfield's (2008) handheld photography was churning stomachs a decade later, theaters wisely posted signs warning of a "roller coaster" effect. Instead of barf bags, theaters handed out refunds.

3. 127 HOURS (2010)

film still from 127 hours
Fox Searchlight

From the get-what-you-pay-for department: Audiences that streamed in for director Danny Boyle’s account of hiker Aron Ralston, who got himself wedged in a cave and had to amputate his own arm with a pocketknife, found themselves bearing witness to James Franco wedged in a cave and amputating his own arm with a pocketknife. Many, many people fainted; some vomited; one person fainted, was hauled away in an ambulance, and returned to the theater to declare the film “excellent.”

4. RESERVOIR DOGS (1992)

It’s not necessarily shocking that the unflinching violence of a Quentin Tarantino movie would prompt audience evacuations: 1994’s Pulp Fiction lost patrons when Uma Thurman got a shot of adrenaline in her heart. But Reservoir Dogs is notable for the people it pulled from their seats. When Michael Madsen’s character began an unsolicited ear amputation of a hostage during an industry screening, the late Wes Craven (creator of The Last House on the Left and A Nightmare on Elm Street) fled the theater.  

5. FREAKS (1932)

Freaks film
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios

Tod Browning’s infamous portrayal of a circus sideshow with revenge in mind was a harrowing experience for filmgoers. Not strictly a horror film, its large cast of “actual” circus performers with a myriad of deformities was unsettling. Freaks suffered mass walkouts upon release, viewers unnerved by missing limbs; MGM insisted on editing the film after a woman claimed she was so aggrieved during a screening that she suffered a miscarriage.  

6. IRREVERSIBLE (2002)

Panned for its depiction of a brutal assault, this revenge film from director Gaspar Noé prompted viewers to head for the exits—but not necessarily because of what was shown onscreen. Noé admitted to using a 27 hertz frequency of bass that can’t be picked up by the human ear during the movie’s first 30 minutes. Known as infrasound, it's been known to induce panic and anxiety in a manner similar to vibrations created by earthquakes. Paranormal Activity (2007) used a similar technique.

7. THE LION KING (1994)

the lion king
Walt Disney Pictures

In the proud Disney tradition of maiming parents came The Lion King, where tiny Simba learns to fend for himself after his father is trampled during a stampede. The animated tragedy proved so intense for younger viewers—Disney’s key demographic—that they had to be temporarily relocated to the lobby until they calmed down.  

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

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15 Toughest Kennections Quizzes, According to Ken Jennings

Ken Jennings on the Jeopardy! set.
Ken Jennings on the Jeopardy! set.
Getty Images

Two times per week, Jeopardy! GOAT Ken Jennings runs 'Kennections,' a quiz featuring seemingly unrelated clues where the answers have one thing in common. To celebrate his 400th Kennection, Jennings scoured the archives and selected 15 of his most challenging quizzes yet. See if you can figure them out.

1. A common denominator

See if you can figure out how ultraviolet-light seeing animals and chess pieces are similar

2. A few degrees of separation

The word for a group of crows and a 5th-century German tribe have one surprising link.

3. Not exactly polar opposites

Adam Sandler and an African island nation share an unexpected trait. 

4. A humerus connection

St. Paul and the Latin name for the city of Troy have more in common than you might think. 

5. A common thread

Stitch together the clues to see how the shape of Hermione Granger’s Time-Turner and an Owl City single are related

6. A tough sell

Aladdin’s magical object and poison-secreting creatures are the stars of this puzzle

7. More than just horse play

Follow the trail to see how a daily newspaper and a Catholic feast are linked.

8. A comedic connection

Deduce the link between a 1959 musical about a striptease legend and a minor prophet. 

9. A puzzle for a wordsmith

See if you can figure out how bridge is related to Richard Nixon. 

10. A proper difference

Frederic Chopin’s native language and a bustling Moroccan port city famed for its delicious oranges share a trait. 

11. An out-of-this-world theme

General George Custer’s middle name and a 1945 Benjamin Britten guide are clues to this astronomical answer. 

12. Sounds like a geographic challenge

A 1989 hit song by The B-52's and the name of Philadelphia’s arena football team will lead you to the correct answer

13. A lyrical link

See if you can figure out how the name B.B. King gave his black Gibson guitars and a beloved Disney Cocker Spaniel are related

14. An elite enigma

Find the link between the island Odysseus desperately wants to reach and the surname of the German royal family that took over the throne of England in 1714. 

15. Common characters

The edible resource you use to power up in Pokemon Go and the leaves often used in Christmas decorations have this in common.