15 Old-Fashioned Hats Ready for a Comeback

istock
istock

Whether we wear them to stay warm, protect our heads, hide our hair, or simply add flair to our ensembles, hats have always been a celebrated part of our wardrobes. In honor of National Hat Day, here are 15 once-iconic toppers that have fallen out of fashion—and should be brought back into style.

1. The Snood

Don’t call this knotted headdress a hair net—it’s actually a snood. In the late 1850s and early 1860s, it was in vogue for young women to hold their hair back with close-fitting, bag-shaped caps they’d woven from velvet, lace, yarn, or other materials.

The trend faded by the 1870s, but the snood made a comeback in the 1940s after female factory workers realized it added both practicality and panache to their work ensembles. The hat fell to the wayside once more after World War II ended and women returned to the domestic sphere.

2. The Cartwheel hat

Resembling a flying saucer affixed to one’s head, the cartwheel hat is a wide-brimmed circular or saucer-shaped topper that first became popular in the 1930s. It was typically worn at a rakish angle, and it was usually fashioned from materials like straw, felt, silk, or taffeta.

To our modern sensibilities, the cartwheel hat may seem bizarre, and records indicate that the look also perplexed the public when it was first debuted. “Do not be astounded if you notice a smartly gowned woman crowned with a hat of huge proportions, for she is but following fashion’s latest edict,” one 1914 newspaper article noted. “The new large hats are broad brimmed and have low crowns, which are not discernible when the hat is worn, hence they resemble cartwheels tilted at a becoming angle.”

3. The tri-corner hat

If you’ve ever seen a portrait of George Washington, chances are good that he was wearing a tri-corner hat, or a tricorn. 17th-century European and American men of all social classes wore these hats because the brim turned up on three sides, allowing them to show off their stylish wigs. The hats were also small, which allowed polite gentlemen to take them off and tuck them underneath their arms when entering a building.

Tricorners were either left plain or festooned with feathers, brocades, silks, or metallic fabrics. They often came in neutrals like black, grey, and tan.

4. cloche hat

iStock.com/upheaval

Famous flappers were fans of the cloche—a fitted, bell-shaped hat that took Roaring Twenties style by storm. Invented in Paris, the cloche became popular among both European and American women during the 1920s. The hat fit neatly over a short bob, and its simplicity allowed the era’s “modern women” to dance, socialize, and move with abandon.

Today, women occasionally wear cloche-like styles. However, the hat still remains synonymous with the Jazz Age.

5. The bowler hat

iStock.com/Kalulu

In 1849, London hat makers Thomas and William Bowler created a toque that gamekeepers on horseback could wear to shield their heads from low hanging branches. With its close fit, low crown, and sturdy make, the bowler hat was way more practical than a top hat.

Over time, businessmen, politicians, and celebrities became fans of the look. By the mid 1950s to 1960s, it was common for men to incorporate bowler hats into their suited ensembles. The look became less common by the 1980s. However, British cavalry officers still traditionally wear bowler hats and suits for their annual parade.

6. The coonskin cap

iStock.com/spillover

While it’s a myth that Davy Crockett wore a coonskin cap, they were indeed popular among American frontiersman during the late 18th century. Early pioneers saw Native Americans wearing the warm, fuzzy hats, and they adopted the look for themselves. Soon, the coonskin cap became inextricably linked with the rugged, individualistic American settler.

Like all iconic looks, changing cultural aesthetics caused the coonskin cap to dwindle in popularity. By 1902, the fuzzy hat wasn’t perceived as “rustic”—it was straight-up redneck. However, the look exploded in popularity once more when a TV show based on Crockett’s adventures premiered in 1954.

Crockett fever faded in the 1960s, and the cap once more became a relic of a bygone era. However, bloggers report that a few brave souls have been spotted donning the coonskin cap while walking the streets of New York City’s SoHo and Williamsburg neighborhoods.

7. THE DEERSTALKER HAT

iStock.com/homydesign

Not surprisingly, the deerstalker hat is worn for hunting. However, fictional detective Sherlock Holmes popularized the hat in the 19th century, trotting about in his novels clad in a cape and the smart headwear. Not surprisingly, the hat is most often worn by rural outdoorsmen—not by genteel city dwellers like Sherlock.

8. BOATER HATS

iStock.com/Easy_Asa

British sailors in the 19th century donned hard, flat-topped hats made from water-resistant varnished straw. Later, English sportsmen wore the stiff-brimmed hats while rowing along the Thames. The look caught on, and by the 1890s, everyone was wearing boater hats—even girls and women, who were becoming more active in outdoor sports.

Boater hats crossed the Atlantic, and were fashionable among middle-class men and college boys alike. During election campaigns, they were dressed up with red, white, and blue bands and transformed into political symbols.

9. THE PILLBOX HAT

The pillbox hat was a simple, elegant, and no-frills accessory hat that was popular from the 1930s through the late 1960s. The round, brim-less hats were worn perched on top of the head. True to their name, they were also shaped like a pillbox.

10. THE HENNIN

iStock.com

Those pointy medieval princess hats with veils have a name: They’re called hennins. Worn by European royalty, the tall, stiff hats were fashioned from expensive fabric and girded with wire or padding. In France, some hennins reached heights of up to three feet. However, English versions of the hennin were smaller and less dramatic.

11. THE FASCINATOR

iStock.com

Unless you’re running with a royal crowd, fascinators probably aren’t on your radar. But they should be: these decorative headpieces can be as simple or as elaborate as you’d like. All around the world—going way back to ancient times—women have dressed up their locks using feathers, cloth, flowers, and more, creating fascinator-like looks. Our favorite is probably the 13th century ramshorn, which involved a headband-brooch combo, plus two coiled buns reminiscent of a certain science fiction heroine.

12. THE BICORNE HAT

iStock.com/sigurcamp

In the late 18th century, European and American military and naval officers (think Napoleon Bonaparte) wore bicornes. The hat had a broad, floppy brim, and its front and back section were folded over and pinned together. This feature made the accessory less cumbersome and easier to carry.

13. THE CALASH

The sky-high hairdos of the late 18th century demanded equally lofty protection. Massive bonnets called calashes fit the bill. Each had wood or whalebone sewn in for stability, but the super tall toppers were collapsible, too.

14. THE PHRYGIAN CAP

The Phrygian cap is most commonly associated with freed Roman slaves, who wore a variant of the soft, pointy hat to symbolize their independence. The hat was later adopted as a symbol of liberty during the French Revolution.

15. THE BALMORAL BONNET

iStock.com/EuToch

This floppy, tasseled beret was named after Queen Victoria’s Scottish estate, Balmoral Castle. The traditional hat is worn tilted sideways, and is typically paired with Scottish highland dress.

Kodak’s New Cameras Don't Just Take Photos—They Also Print Them

Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Kodak

Snapping a photo and immediately sharing it on social media is definitely convenient, but there’s still something so satisfying about having the printed photo—like you’re actually holding the memory in your hands. Kodak’s new STEP cameras now offer the best of both worlds.

As its name implies, the Kodak STEP Instant Print Digital Camera, available for $70 on Amazon, lets you take a picture and print it out on that very same device. Not only do you get to skip the irksome process of uploading photos to your computer and printing them on your bulky, non-portable printer (or worse yet, having to wait for your local pharmacy to print them for you), but you never need to bother with ink cartridges or toner, either. The Kodak STEP comes with special 2-inch-by-3-inch printing paper inlaid with color crystals that bring your image to life. There’s also an adhesive layer on the back, so you can easily stick your photos to laptop covers, scrapbooks, or whatever else could use a little adornment.

There's a 10-second self-timer, so you don't have to ask strangers to take your group photos.Kodak

For those of you who want to give your photos some added flair, you might like the Kodak STEP Touch, available for $130 from Amazon. It’s similar to the regular Kodak STEP, but the LCD touch screen allows you to edit your photos before you print them; you can also shoot short videos and even share your content straight to social media.

If you want to print photos from your smartphone gallery, there's the Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer. This portable $80 printer connects to any iOS or Android device with Bluetooth capabilities and can print whatever photos you send to it.

The Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer connects to an app that allows you to add filters and other effects to your photos. Kodak

All three Kodak STEP devices come with some of that magical printer paper, but you can order additional refills, too—a 20-sheet set costs $8 on Amazon.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

15 Facts About Pee-wee's Big Adventure On Its 35th Anniversary

Paul Reubens in Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985).
Paul Reubens in Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985).
Warner Home Video

He may be a perpetual man-child, but Pee-wee Herman has been around for more than four decades (the character made his first appearance in 1977). His first feature film, Pee-wee’s Big Adventure, debuted in August of 1985. Since then, millions of people have no doubt pondered the question, "Does the Alamo have a basement?" The answer is, yes! Read on for more fascinating facts about Pee-wee and his big adventure.

1. Pee-wee's Big Adventure was originally supposed to be a remake of Pollyanna.

Paul Reubens in Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985).Warner Home Video

Before the inspiration struck for the quest for Pee-wee’s missing bicycle, the writers planned on more or less remaking the Disney classic Pollyanna. Pee-wee would arrive in a new town in need of some fresh perspective, and by the end of the movie, he would have endeared himself to even the most curmudgeonly of the citizens.

2. The movie changed when Warner Bros. gave Paul Reubens a Schwinn.

Cast and crew members often take bicycles around studio lots to get from point A to point B. Reubens was given a 1940s Schwinn to ride while he was at Warner Bros. working on the movie script; he loved it so much he decided to retool the whole Pollyanna concept.

3. Pee-wee's Big Adventure is a retelling of Bicycle Thieves.

Paul Reubens in Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985).Warner Home Video

After the idea of Pee-wee as Pollyanna bit the dust, the script ended up turning into a “surrealistic reworking” of Bicycle Thieves, an essential example of Italian Neorealism that was given an Honorary Oscar and regularly shows up on every “must-see” film list. But Pee-wee’s Big Adventure has its own champions ...

4. Pee-wee's Big Adventure made Roger Ebert’s list of “Guilty Pleasures.”

Though he never officially rated the movie, in 1987 Ebert confessed that it made his list of Guilty Pleasure movies:

“The movie is not just a strange little man acting goofy. Pee-wee has created a whole fairytale universe as consistent and fascinating as Alice’s Wonderland or the world of the Hobbits in The Lord of the Rings. Pee-wee’s Big Adventure is one of those movies like The Wizard of Oz, I think, that kids can look at in one state of mind while the grown-ups enjoy it on a completely different level.”

5. Paul Reubens fought to get a 26-year-old Tim Burton to direct Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

Although Paul Reubens had a long list of directors he wanted to work with, the studio chose one not on the list. Rather than go along for the sake of getting the movie made, Reubens put his foot down and refused to proceed. Shortly thereafter, one of Reubens’s friends mentioned a short film called Frankenweenie (the precursor to the feature-length movie that came out in 2012) by Tim Burton. Reubens was friends with Shelley Duvall, who was in the Burton film, so he gave her a call. She agreed that Reubens and Burton would make a perfect match, and the connection was made. “It was the biggest piece of luck early on in my career that I could have had,” Reubens later said.

6. Pee-wee's Big Adventure was Tim Burton and Danny Elfman's first collaboration.

Not only was Pee-wee's Big Adventure Tim Burton’s first big movie, it was also Danny Elfman’s. Elfman wasn’t actually scoring films at the time, at least not on the scale that he is now. But Burton knew him through his work with Oingo Boingo, and Paul Reubens knew him from music he had written for a film called Forbidden Zone. After meeting with Burton to chat about the project, Elfman went home with a tune in his head.

“I did a demo on a four track tape player, playing all the parts, and I made a cassette and sent it to him and never expected to hear from him again," Elfman told Entertainment Weekly in 2015. "But that piece of music became the main title of Pee-wee’s Big Adventure, and it got me the job. I was really shocked.” It was, of course, the beginning of a longtime collaboration and friendship.

7. Elizabeth Daily, a.k.a. Dottie, is the voice of Tommy Pickles.

In addition to acting in front of the camera, Elizabeth Daily is also a talented voice actress. If you don’t know her as Tommy Pickles in Rugrats or Buttercup in The Powerpuff Girls, you’ve probably heard her in a number of small roles in Wreck-It Ralph, Happy Feet, and many, many more. She was also on season 5 of The Voice.

8. Tim Burton has a cameo in Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

Tim Burton made a cameo in Pee-wee's Big Adventure, which you can watch below:

9. Warner Bros. thought Pee-wee's Big Adventure was weird.

After seeing the finished product, the studio wasn’t so sure it wanted to put much more money behind Pee-wee's Big Adventure. Finding it all a bit bizarre, they decided to roll the film out slowly and on a regional basis. When it proved to be popular with even a limited audience, Warner cranked up the publicity machine. By the time all was said and done, Pee-wee had earned nearly $41 million at the box office.

10. Phil Hartman co-wrote the script for Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

Reubens and SNL legend Phil Hartman originally developed the Pee-wee character when they were in the Groundlings together. HBO picked up Pee-wee for a comedy show in 1981, which is what eventually led to the movie in 1985. Hartman was Reubens’s writing partner throughout all of that, and also for Pee-wee’s Playhouse, where he made occasional appearances as Kap’n Karl.

11. Pee-wee’s bicycle from Pee-wee's Big Adventure was sold on eBay in 2014.

Though Pee-wee estimated his bike’s value at “a hundred million, trillion, billion dollars” in the movie, it didn’t quite fetch that much when it was sold on eBay in 2014. It did, however, sell for $36,600.

12. There were at least 10 bikes used in Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

Warner Home Video

Missed out on the auction? Never fear—there could still be an authentic Pee-wee bike in your future, since at least 10 bikes were built for use in the film. The Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh had one of them on display for a while.

13. Pee-wee's Big Adventure wasn’t the first time Paul Reubens did the “Pee-wee Dance.”

He performed it on The Gong Show in the late 1970s, but the choreography goes back even further than that. The dance, he has said, was actually inspired by a dirty joke his dad used to tell. “The joke was something [like] you put one thumb in your [Reubens points at his backside] and one in your mouth, and then you switch.”

14. The idea for Pee-wee's Playhouse came up at the Pee-wee's Big Adventure premiere.

Executives at CBS approached Reubens’s manager at the movie's premiere and wanted to know if “Pee-wee” was interested in doing a cartoon show. But Reubens had another format in mind, and asked how they would feel about something live-action.

“I was thinking about how important all those kids’ shows were to me when I was a kid, and how much I feel like they affected me, and that just seemed really exciting to me," he said. "I was really excited by the idea that doing a real kids’ show could potentially affect kids in an amazingly positive and great way.” Pee-wee’s Playhouse debuted a year later.

15. Large Marge almost got the axe from Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

It’s one of the most memorable scenes in the entire movie, but it almost didn’t make it to the screen. “I almost cut the best thing before an audience saw it,” Burton said in Burton on Burton. “It was a special effect and those are the first things to go.” IFC lists the scene as #5 on their list of "25 Scariest Moments in Non-Horror Movies."