Spain's Famous Blue Wine Is Coming to America

Gïk
Gïk

Last year, a Spanish startup caused a stir when it introduced its electric-blue wine to markets in Europe. Now, after receiving preorders for more than 30,000 bottles from American customers, the eye-catching beverage is finally ready to make its way to the U.S., Eater reports.

The bright blue drink, dubbed Gïk, is the creation of six young entrepreneurs with no previous experience in the winemaking industry. They collaborated with University of the Basque Country and the food research department of the Basque Government to make the product.

Gïk is made from a blend of red and white grapes with a non-calorie sweetener added in. Though the color resembles something you'd find in the cleaning supplies aisle, the ingredients that create the effect are all natural. A pigment found in grape skin and indigo from the Isatis tinctoria plant (commonly known as woad) are responsible for the wine's alarming hue.

The shade—which according to co-founder Aritz López represents "movement, innovation, fluidity, change, and infinity"—is intended to appeal to Millennial buyers. With an alcohol content percentage of 11.5, Gïk is comparable to a white zinfandel or prosecco, and a pack of three bottles retails for $48.

The Basque region of Spain is traditionally known for its sparkling, acidic wine, but Gïk was designed to stand out from the current options. In 2016, López told Eater that his team felt the Spanish wine scene was "missing a little revolution," so they set out to create something innovative. But it turned out to be a little too innovative for the company's own good: According to Spanish law, only red or white wine can be sold in local markets, and Gïk was fined €3000 (about $3600) for violating the rule. Following the controversy, they were forced to drop the "wine" label and start branding the concoction as "99% wine and 1% grape must."

Standards are less strict in the U.S., and when bottles reach markets stateside they will be flying under the wine banner once again. Gïk will make its U.S. debut in stores in Miami, Boston, and Texas before hopefully expanding to retailers in New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Washington, California, and Nevada. And while they may have the blue wine market cornered, there's at least one blue-hued beer brand out there Gïk will be competing with.

[h/t Eater]

Wine Prices Are Dropping—Here’s Why

These glasses of wine might've been cheaper than usual.
These glasses of wine might've been cheaper than usual.
Rostislav_Sedlacek/iStock via Getty Images

Stopping by the local wine shop on your way home from work today? That bottle of red, white, or rosé might be a little cheaper than it has been in the past—and not (necessarily) because today is National Drink Wine Day. According to CNN, the price of wine is on the decline due to a grape surplus in California and a decrease in demand across the country.

Jeff Bitter, president of Allied Grape Growers, told CNN that demand had grown pretty consistently for about 20 years before abruptly slowing down in 2015. That surprising decrease, combined with especially plentiful grape harvests at northern California vineyards—which were partially the result of improved harvesting techniques—has forced the market to drop its prices.

"Since it takes up to five years to bring wine to market from the initial planning stages of planting a vineyard, it makes hitting future demand very complicated,” Bitter told CNN. “In this case, we overshot demand.”

Prices will likely stay low for a few years while vineyards figure out how many acres of vines they need to match consumer demand. Meanwhile, the rest of the wine industry will be trying to figure out how to increase demand by targeting a seemingly indifferent demographic: Millennials.

Rob McMillan, founder of Silicon Valley Bank’s wine division, explained in the annual report on the state of the wine industry that this price drop could be one way of tacitly encouraging Millennials to choose wine over other types of alcohol.

“Acute oversupply will allow for better-quality juice in lower-priced bottles, which will improve value and may provide an incentive for some Millennials to become more consistent wine buyers,” McMillan said in the report.

Whether or not you’re a wine drinker yourself, you can still enjoy learning a little something about everyone’s favorite fermented fruit juice—here are 10 facts you might not know about wine.

[h/t CNN]

Confuse Your Friends With an Upside Down Wine Glass

AddLiquid/Amazon
AddLiquid/Amazon

Sometimes the best pranks are the ones that take the least amount of work. And this one is as simple as drinking a glass of wine—upside down.

The Upside Down Wine Glass is available on Amazon for $15. And unlike traditional glasses, you pour your vino into the stem, creating the illusion that you're drinking from the bottom and about to spill the glass’s contents everywhere (the prank is probably best pulled when you're drinking red wine and sitting on a friend's new white couch).

Alongside looking cool, this 11-inch glass can hold up to 25 ounces of wine (a 750 ml bottle) at once. And while definitely a conversation starter, there's no word on how it affects the taste and general drinking experience.

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