Here’s Why Confusing Diesel With Gas at the Pump Is a Problem

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iStock

It can happen to anyone. Maybe you were distracted by a text message or phone call or someone else pulling up at the pump. You grabbed the wrong handle, and now your gas tank is loaded with diesel fuel—a simple mistake that can cost you big-time.

The issue is combustion. Gasoline-powered cars have engines which run on a combination of liquid fuel and ordinary air, which are mixed together inside the vehicle and make their way to a cylinder block, where the fuel-air mix is compressed by pistons. A spark is used to ignite the substance in a small, contained explosion, and the gas produced as a result pushes back against the pistons, forcing them down and generating the power necessary to keep the car running as it goes from place to place. But these engines can't combust diesel, for one key reason.

Unlike gasoline, diesel doesn’t readily mix with air unless certain conditions are met. While gasoline can evaporate at room temperature, diesel must be exposed to intense heat in order to follow suit. Diesel engines work by spraying the fuel into a cylinder that’s already filled with high-temperature compressed air, which makes the diesel itself combust spontaneously—no spark required. Gasoline engines can’t provide diesel with the temperatures it needs to combust, and, unable to evaporate sufficiently, diesel won’t ignite when the spark is released.

To those who drive gas-powered vehicles, diesel is useless. Ideally, you realized your mistake at the gas station before the car was even started—but if not, as soon as the last drops of gasoline in the car, truck, or motorcycle’s system are gone, the vehicle will shut down, leaving you stranded. And because gas-powered rides aren’t able to process the fuel, the diesel has to be removed manually—a process that isn't cheap.

First, you'll need to call a tow truck; then it’s time to enlist a skilled car mechanic. Depending on how much of the liquid you’ve poured into the tank, there’s a good to fair chance that some of it made its way into the car’s fuel line. Your mechanic will probably have no choice but to drain the entire fuel system, which can set you back $500 to $1000.

Thankfully, gas stations try to stop their customers from making this mistake in the first place. Often, the nozzles on diesel pumps are designed to be too wide to slot into most gas tanks. Also, at many locales, these pumps are colored bright green, yellow, or orange, which makes them more conspicuous and serves as a visual reminder that they are not, in fact, gasoline dispensers. However, there isn’t a universal chromatic system. A few companies—like BP—use green-tipped pumps on their gas dispensers. So before you use any pump at any gas station, do yourself a favor and read the label.

Here’s What You Need to Know About the New Coronavirus

jarun011/iStock via Getty Images
jarun011/iStock via Getty Images

This morning, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the second case of the recently discovered coronavirus in the U.S. Find out what it is, where it is, how to avoid it, and all the other need-to-know information about the illness below.

What is the new coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a group of viruses named for the crown-shaped spikes that cover their surfaces (corona is the Latin word for crown). According to the CDC, human coronaviruses can cause upper-respiratory tract illnesses, including the common cold, and can sometimes lead to more severe lower-respiratory tract issues like pneumonia or bronchitis.

Because this latest coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, is so new, health officials are currently trying to figure out how it works and how to treat it. It’s not the first time a potent new coronavirus has caused an international outbreak: SARS-CoV originated in Asia and spread to more than two dozen countries in 2003, and MERS-CoV first infected people in Saudi Arabia before spreading across the globe in 2012.

Where is the coronavirus outbreak happening?

The majority of cases are in China, which counts more than 800 confirmed diagnoses. Most are in Wuhan, a city in China’s Hubei province where 2019-nCoV was first detected last month. Additional cases have been reported in South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.

The CDC has confirmed two U.S. cases—a man in his thirties outside Seattle, and a 60-year-old woman in Chicago—both of whom had recently returned from trips to Wuhan. A CDC official said another 63 potential cases are being investigated in 22 states, and airports in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, and San Francisco are conducting health screenings on passengers arriving from China.

Chinese officials have shut down transportation to and from Wuhan. Tourist spots like Beijing’s Forbidden City, Shanghai Disneyland, and a portion of the Great Wall are also closed temporarily.

What are the symptoms of the new coronavirus?

Symptoms are similar to those caused by a cold or the flu, including fever, dry cough, and breathing difficulty. The New York Times reported that as of Friday morning, 25 people in China have died from the virus, and most of them were older men with preexisting health conditions like cirrhosis, diabetes, and Parkinson’s disease.

How does the new coronavirus spread?

Because most of the early cases of 2019-nCoV were traced back to a seafood and meat market in Wuhan, health officials think the virus originally spread from infected animals to humans, but it’s now being transmitted from person to person.

Though scientists are still studying exactly how that happens, the leading theory is that it travels in tiny droplets of fluid from the respiratory tract when a person coughs or sneezes.

How do you avoid the new coronavirus?

The CDC is warning everyone to avoid any nonessential trips to Wuhan, and to avoid animals or sick people if you’re traveling elsewhere in China. If you’ve been to China in the last two weeks and experience any of the symptoms listed above, you should seek medical attention immediately—and you should call the doctor’s office or emergency room beforehand to let them know you’re coming.

Otherwise, simply stick to the precautions you’d normally take when trying to stay healthy: Wash your hands often with soap and water, cover your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing, stay away from sick people, and thoroughly cook any meat or eggs before eating them.

Should you be worried about the new coronavirus?

The global health community is taking 2019-nCoV seriously in order to curb the outbreak as quickly as possible, but you shouldn’t panic. The CDC maintains that it’s a low-risk situation in the U.S., and public health officials are echoing that message.

“We don’t want the American public to be worried about this, because their risk is low,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told USA Today.

[h/t USA Today]

Has An Element Ever Been Removed From the Periodic Table?

lucadp/iStock via Getty Images
lucadp/iStock via Getty Images

Barry Gehm:

Yes, didymium, or Di. It was discovered by Carl Mosander in 1841, and he named it didymium from the Greek word didymos, meaning twin, because it was almost identical to lanthanum in its properties. In 1879, a French chemist showed that Mosander’s didymium contained samarium as well as an unknown element. In 1885, Carl von Weisbach showed that the unknown element was actually two elements, which he isolated and named praseodidymium and neodidymium (although the di syllable was soon dropped). Ironically, the twin turned out to be twins.

The term didymium filter is still used to refer to welding glasses colored with a mixture of neodymium and praseodymium oxides.

One might cite as other examples various claims to have created/discovered synthetic elements. Probably the best example of this would be masurium (element 43), which a team of German chemists claimed to have discovered in columbium (now known as niobium) ore in 1925. The claim was controversial and other workers could not replicate it, but some literature from the period does list it among the elements.

In 1936, Emilio Segrè and Carlo Perrier isolated element 43 from molybdenum foil that had been used in a cyclotron; they named it technetium. Even the longest-lived isotopes of technetium have a short half-life by geological standards (millions of years) and it has only ever been found naturally in minute traces as a product of spontaneous uranium fission. For this reason, the original claim of discovery (as masurium) is almost universally regarded as erroneous.

As far as I know, in none of these cases with synthetic elements has anyone actually produced a quantity of the element that one could see and weigh that later turned out not to be an element, in contrast to the case with didymium. (In the case of masurium, for instance, the only evidence of its existence was a faint x-ray signal at a specific wavelength.)

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

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