Why We Have Different Types of Screws

iStock/teerawut111
iStock/teerawut111

If you've ever mistakenly grabbed the Phillips head screwdriver when you needed a flat head, you've probably asked yourself why there are different types of screws. Let's start at the beginning.

The screwdriver, originally called a screwturner or turnscrew, entered the world inconspicuously and kept a very low profile until its 300th birthday. Historians believe it was invented in Germany, but aren't sure exactly when. The Medieval Housebook of Wolfegg Castle, the oldest known written reference to the tool, has a hazy publishing date somewhere between 1475 and 1490. Considering the invention likely predates the book by at least a few years, the mid to late 15th century is about as exact a birthday as it gets. For about 300 years, the persistent presence of screws is the only solid evidence that screwdrivers even existed. Then, suddenly, documentation of screwdrivers exploded across Europe, particularly in France.

Early screwdrivers had pear-shaped handles and were made for slotted screws. Metal screws as we know them today have been in use since at least the 15th century for cabinetry work and to secure plates on jousting armor. Before that, wooden screws were used in wine and olive oil presses as far back as the 1st - 3rd century BC (how they turned them for so long without a screwdriver, I haven’t been able to figure out).

These early metal screws were prohibitively expensive. It wasn’t until several advances in screw making – among them, Jesse Ramsden and Henry Maudslay's screw-cutting lathes and David Wilkinson’s and Job and William Wyatt’s mass production of screws on assembly line-like systems – occurred around the beginning of the First Industrial Revolution that the screw became easy enough to produce to become popular and widespread. This increase in popularity, of course, led to the refinement and diversification of the screwdriver. The tool took on many different shapes and sizes, though for a long time every version was still for flat slotted screws, which were the only type around.

Better Heads

This changed in 1908, when Canadian P.L. Robertson patented the “first recess-drive type fastener practical for production usage,” a recessed square-drive screw that bears his name. Robertson screws became a standard in Canada and gained a buzz in the U.S. when the Ford Motor Company, one of Robertson's first customers, used over seven hundred of them on each Model T. The square-drive head on Robertson screws had an advantage over slot heads because the driver was relatively easy to get situated on the head and stayed put during installation once it was there. A screw like Robertson’s became crucial as American manufacturers moved increasingly toward mass production methods. The time it took to align the driver with the slot, multiplied across thousands of workers in a factory and across hundreds, if not thousands, of screws per worker per day, became a significant loss of time and money. Additionally, the automated screwdrivers used on assembly lines often slipped out of the screws’ slots and into whatever component was being assembled or stripped the screw once it was driven all the way. [Image credit: Saforrest]

The American automobile industry was especially in need of a screws screw that could stand up to the torque of their automated drivers and be fitted and tightened quickly, but a bad break in Robertson’s past doomed him just when his invention was needed most. Dealing with dishonest parties while licensing his screw in England, Robertson wound up losing the rights to his invention and had to spend a small fortune to buy them back. When Ford, wanting to protect his assembly advantage (the screws saved his workers two hours of assembly time per vehicle), asked for a licensing agreement from Robertson so that he could manufacture and control the distribution of the screws, Robertson turned him down and he refused to allow anyone to make the screws under license. After their run on the Model T, Ford had to limit the use of the screws to his Canadian division and the widespread adoption of the Robertson screw in the U.S. fizzled and failed.

Enter Portland, Oregon-based businessman Henry F. Phillips and the patent for a screw with a deep X-shaped slot, which he had purchased from friend and inventor J.P. Thompson. Phillips refined the design of the fastener, today known as a Phillips screw, for automated screwdrivers. The X-shape of the slot and pointed tip of the Phillips head screwdriver made the driver self-centering and unlikely to slip out when it wasn’t supposed to. The recessed slot was shallow enough, though, that the driver did pop out when the screw was fully tightened, which prevented over-torquing and damage to the screw, the driver and the product being assembled.

The American Screw Company began mass-producing Phillips’ design. A successful trial on the 1936 Cadillac helped it proliferate through the U.S. auto industry. By 1940, 85% of the screw manufacturing companies in the U.S. had a license to produce the Phillips screw design. Usage spread from the auto manufacturers as the Phillips drive system was used during the Second World War on many wartime products and vehicles. Though originally meant for automated, industrial applications, Phillips screws and handheld screwdrivers found their way into the toolboxes of handy men and women across the country by the turn middle of the century. [Image credit: U.S Patent and Trademark Office.]

Other Ways the World Turns

Most anyone who’s had to fix anything at home or put together an IKEA couch has heard of slotted and Phillips screws and maybe even hex sockets. The world of screws is vast, though, and plenty of other types of screw heads and drives exist, like the Mortorq, the Pozidriv and the Bristol. You can take a crash course in the different types of screws here, and if you want a more in-depth history of screws and drivers, check out Witold Rybczynski’s One Good Turn: A Natural History of the Screwdriver and the Screw.

10 Products for a Better Night's Sleep

Amazon/Comfort Spaces
Amazon/Comfort Spaces

Getting a full eight hours of sleep can be tough these days. If you’re having trouble catching enough Zzzs, consider giving these highly rated and recommended products a try.

1. Everlasting Comfort Pure Memory Foam Knee Pillow; $25

Everlasting Comfort Knee Pillow
Everlasting Comfort/Amazon

For side sleepers, keeping the spine, hips, and legs aligned is key to a good night’s rest—and a pain-free morning after. Everlasting Comfort’s memory foam knee pillow is ergonomically designed to fit between the knees or thighs to ensure proper alignment. One simple but game-changing feature is the removable strap, which you can fasten around one leg; this keeps the pillow in place even as you roll at night, meaning you don’t have to wake up to adjust it (or pick it up from your floor). Reviewers call the pillow “life-changing” and “the best knee pillow I’ve found.” Plus, it comes with two pairs of ear plugs.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Letsfit White Noise Machine; $21

Letsfit White Noise Machine
Letsfit/Amazon

White noise machines: They’re not just for babies! This Letsfit model—which is rated 4.7 out of five with nearly 3500 reviews—has 14 potential sleep soundtracks, including three white noise tracks, to better block out everything from sirens to birds that chirp enthusiastically at dawn (although there’s also a birds track, if that’s your thing). It also has a timer function and a night light.

Buy it: Amazon

3. ECLIPSE Blackout Curtains; $16

Eclipse Black Out Curtains
Eclipse/Amazon

According to the National Sleep Foundation, too much light in a room when you’re trying to snooze is a recipe for sleep disaster. These understated polyester curtains from ECLIPSE block 99 percent of light and reduce noise—plus, they’ll help you save on energy costs. "Our neighbor leaves their backyard light on all night with what I can only guess is the same kind of bulb they use on a train headlight. It shines across their yard, through ours, straight at our bedroom window," one Amazon reviewer who purchased the curtains in black wrote. "These drapes block the light completely."

Buy it: Amazon

4. JALL Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm Clock; $38

JALL Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm Clock
JALL/Amazon

Being jarred awake by a blaring alarm clock can set the wrong mood for the rest of your day. Wake up in a more pleasant way with this clock, which gradually lights up between 10 percent and 100 percent in the 30 minutes before your alarm. You can choose between seven different colors and several natural sounds as well as a regular alarm beep, but why would you ever use that? “Since getting this clock my sleep has been much better,” one reviewer reported. “I wake up not feeling tired but refreshed.”

Buy it: Amazon

5. Philips SmartSleep Wake-Up Light; $200

Philips SmartSleep Wake-Up Light
Philips/Amazon

If you’re looking for an alarm clock with even more features, Philips’s SmartSleep Wake-Up Light is smartphone-enabled and equipped with an AmbiTrack sensor, which tracks things like bedroom temperature, humidity, and light levels, then gives recommendations for how you can get a better night’s rest.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Slumber Cloud Stratus Sheet Set; $159

Stratus sheets from Slumber Cloud.
Slumber Cloud

Being too hot or too cold can kill a good night’s sleep. The Good Housekeeping Institute rated these sheets—which are made with Outlast fibers engineered by NASA—as 2020’s best temperature-regulating sheets.

Buy it: SlumberCloud

7. Comfort Space Coolmax Sheet Set; $29-$40

Comfort Spaces Coolmax Sheets
Comfort Spaces/Amazon

If $159 sheets are out of your price range, the GHI recommends these sheets from Comfort Spaces, which are made with moisture-wicking Coolmax microfiber. Depending on the size you need, they range in price from $29 to $40.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Coop Home Goods Eden Memory Foam Pillow; $80

Coop Eden Pillow
Coop Home Goods/Amazon

This pillow—which has a 4.5-star rating on Amazon—is filled with memory foam scraps and microfiber, and comes with an extra half-pound of fill so you can add, or subtract, the amount in the pillow for ultimate comfort. As a bonus, the pillows are hypoallergenic, mite-resistant, and washable.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Baloo Weighted Blanket; $149-$169

Baloo Weighted Blanket
Baloo/Amazon

Though the science is still out on weighted blankets, some people swear by them. Wirecutter named this Baloo blanket the best, not in small part because, unlike many weighted blankets, it’s machine-washable and -dryable. It’s currently available in 12-pound ($149) twin size and 20-pound ($169) queen size. It’s rated 4.7 out of five stars on Amazon, with one reviewer reporting that “when it's spread out over you it just feels like a comfy, snuggly hug for your whole body … I've found it super relaxing for falling asleep the last few nights, and it looks nice on the end of the bed, too.” 

Buy it: Amazon 

10. Philips Smartsleep Snoring Relief Band; $200

Philips SmartSleep Snoring Relief Band
Philips/Amazon

Few things can disturb your slumber—and that of the ones you love—like loudly sawing logs. Philips’s Smartsleep Snoring Relief Band is designed for people who snore when they’re sleeping on their backs, and according to the company, 86 percent of people who used the band reported reduced snoring after a month. The device wraps around the torso and is equipped with a sensor that delivers vibrations if it detects you moving to sleep on your back; those vibrations stop when you roll onto your side. The next day, you can see how many hours you spent in bed, how many of those hours you spent on your back, and your response rate to the vibrations. The sensor has an algorithm that notes your response rate and tweaks the intensity of vibrations based on that. “This device works exactly as advertised,” one Amazon reviewer wrote. “I’d say it’s perfect.”

Buy it: Amazon

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Cracking Open the History of Unsolved Mysteries

Robert Stack hosts the original Unsolved Mysteries.
Robert Stack hosts the original Unsolved Mysteries.
NBC

With his steely glare and trademark trench coat, Robert Stack took viewers on a journey through tales of true crime, alien abductions, amnesia, and lost loves. It was Unsolved Mysteries, and on this week’s episode of "Throwback," host Erin McCarthy is taking us down some dark alleys to discover the origin of this classic 1990s series that’s being rebooted on Netflix. Join us.

Be sure to head here and subscribe so you don't miss an episode of "Throwback," where we explore the fascinating stories behind some of the greatest toys and trends from your childhood.