House for Sale in Vermont Falls on Both Sides of the U.S.-Canada Border

iStock
iStock

In Brian and Joan DuMoulin's household, it’s possible to take an international trip without stepping outside. As the Associated Press reports, the 7000-square-foot home has its foundation planted on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border. Now, the owners are looking to sell the property after inheriting it 40 years ago.

A merchant constructed the building on the border of Beebe Plain, Vermont, and Stanstead, Quebec in 1782 as a convenient way to sell goods to farmers in both places. The house's current residents have dual citizenship, but even so, navigating the space can be complicated.

U.S. and Canada border services, which both have outposts facing the house, have permitted the residents to move across the border as long as they remain in their house, front yard, and backyard. But going any further could lead to serious consequences: A hidden gate in the backyard had to be wired shut per U.S. agents’ request.

The DuMoulins are currently living in a different house in Vermont with plans to move to Ontario once the border house is sold. The granite-walled building is divided into five apartments and sits on a property spanning a little less than a quarter-acre. It’s going for an asking price of $109,000, but the dilapidated structure is projected to require $600,000 in renovations.

If the armed border agents and high repair costs don’t sound appealing, there are easier ways to experience the peculiar feeling of being in two places at once, including the Four Corners monument between Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona and a restaurant that straddles the Dutch-Belgian border.

[h/t ABC News]

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Tiny Ghost Town of Cleator, Arizona (Pop. 8) Can Be Yours for $1.25 Million

It's not Schitt's Creek, but it could be.
It's not Schitt's Creek, but it could be.

You could spend $1.25 million on a relatively normal-sized house in a really expensive area—or you could use the money to buy a whole ghost town in Arizona.

Located almost 70 miles north of Phoenix, the 40-acre town of Cleator, Arizona, comprises 20 buildings and eight full-time residents, all of whom rent their property from the current town owners. There’s a general store, a bar, and even a yacht club (though without a nearby body of water, the complimentary yacht club T-shirts and membership cards are mostly a joke).

“You’ve heard the term ‘where everybody knows your name?’ That’s Cleator,” bar owner Mike Brown told 12NEWS. In addition to local customers, Brown’s watering hole is frequented by bikers, travelers, and day-trippers. There’s even a second bar built into an old pontoon boat in its backyard, complete with non-operational jet skis and tables made from surfboards—a cheeky nod to that aforementioned “yacht club.” And if a piece of scrap metal nailed to the establishment’s exterior is to be believed, Cleator isn’t only home to humans: There are also five dogs and two “grumpy cats.”

As realtor Justin Godsey explains in the video above, Cleator was originally established as a gold mining town in 1864. James Cleator named the town after himself when he bought it in 1925, and it's been in the family ever since. But Cleator’s descendants are ready to hand over the keys to the kingdom—and with those keys comes the opportunity to rename the town whatever you want.

If you’re interested in learning more (or buying Cleator for yourself), you can reach out to Godsey through the North&Co. real estate website here.

[h/t 12NEWS]