45 Brilliant Uses For Thanksgiving Leftovers

iStock
iStock

Thanksgiving is one of the most anticipated meals of the year. But the day after? Leftover central. Instead of pushing untouched stuffing and turkey into the depths of the fridge, try out these Thanksgiving leftover ideas to spread Turkey Day cheer a little bit longer.

1. Shepherd's pie

Shepherd's Pie.
iStock

Stuffing, mashed potatoes, veggies, and turkey can come together for a quick shepherd's pie that clears out multiple side dishes all at once. And unlike pot pies, there's no need to roll out a crust—just top with extra gravy for a complete meal.

2. Stir-fry

Wok of stir-fry.
iStock

Stir-fry can easily be tailored to whatever leftovers you have in the fridge. Turkey and Brussels sprouts work well together, but any vegetables will do. Leftover wine can be used as a turkey marinade, making use of half-empty bottles that could otherwise go bad. The key to making a great leftover stir-fry is having a hot pan, and using meat that has warmed at room temperature for about 20 minutes.

3. Pizza

Slice of cheese and cranberry pizza.
iStock

Thanksgiving pizza quickly clears out leftovers—that’s because many recipes call for mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and turkey. Substitute gravy for marinara, and don’t stress about making a crust from scratch; refrigerated dough (perhaps from any unmade crescent rolls) makes this leftover innovation a much faster meal.

4. Casseroles

Piece of casserole.
iStock

The classic casserole is one of the easiest ways to get rid of leftovers, and that’s because it can be thrown together quickly and baked with little oversight (a much-needed cooking style after a big Thanksgiving meal). Even leftover casseroles (like green bean casserole) can be worked into a new dish. The trick for casserole success is creating layers, similar to lasagna, instead of blending all ingredients together.

5. Muffins

Cranberry muffins.
iStock

Thanksgiving dinner can easily make its way to the next day's breakfast without picky eaters even noticing. Muffins made from sweeter leftovers, like whole or sauced cranberries, offer up a seasonal flavor while clearing out the fridge. And cooks can even sneak in a few veggies, such as carrots, for an added nutritional boost.

6. French toast

Cranberry French toast.
iStock

Turn carb-heavy dinner breads or dessert loaves into breakfast treats with a stovetop or baked version of French toast. This quick-cooking breakfast calls for any leftover bread, and can use up cranberry sauce, too, when used as a topping or filling.

7. Potato and stuffing cakes

Plate of potato cakes.
iStock

Leftover mashed potatoes can be repurposed in many ways, but what about stuffing? Two cups of stuffing, an egg, and butter are all it takes to make stuffing cakes—à la potato cakes—that fry up for a lunchtime snack. If you want to carb-load for a second day in a row, you can mix mashed potatoes and stuffing for a similar pan-fried patty.

8. Doughnuts

Sweet potato doughnuts.
iStock

In the 1940s, spudnut shops popped up throughout the U.S., making tasty doughnut snacks from dried potatoes. While it's hard to find a modern spudnut spot, you can recreate this decades-old snack using leftover mashed potatoes. Sweet potatoes work just as well when paired with leftover cranberries.

9. Pancakes

Stack of potato pancakes
iStock

Pumpkin pie can be transformed into pancakes for an easy breakfast following a big day of cooking. Beat two slices of pie into pancake batter for festive fall breakfast, and top with leftover fruit or cranberries.

10. Dessert crisps

Six bowls of fruit crisps.
iStock

Fruit crumbles and crisps became popular during World War II, when food rationing made it difficult for home cooks to craft elaborate desserts. Luckily, these recipes are perfect for after Thanksgiving, because they require minimal effort and few ingredients, all while using up leftover cranberry sauce, apples, and other fruit dishes.

11. Day-after pies

Cranberry pie.
iStock

Sure, Thanksgiving is known for its standard pies: pecan, pumpkin, and sweet potato. But chances are, those pies don't make it to day two. Clear out your leftovers stash and fulfill a sugar craving with a cranberry pie—a lighter, whipped version with marshmallows is easy to make after a whole day of cooking, or a slab-style pie hits the spot if your oven's still begging for attention.

12. Pie smoothies

Glass of pumpkin smoothie.
iStock

If you somehow have leftover pumpkin and sweet potato pies but no whipped topping, no worries. Pie smoothies are as easy to make as they are to sip: Simply toss leftover pie, sans crust, into a blender with milk or yogurt for a smooth way to savor Thanksgiving leftovers.

13. Cocktails

Cranberry cocktails.
iStock

After a long day of fielding personal questions from distant relatives, you may need a stiff drink. And yes, you can use Thanksgiving meal remnants to unwind. Candied yams, Cognac, and hazelnut liqueur combine for a "Candied Yam Libation," while a "Turkey Tippler" blends turkey-infused bourbon, bitters, and celery for garnish. 

14. Sipping vinegars

Jars of apple vinegars.
iStock

Like other home-brewed drinks, sipping or drinking vinegars are beginning to see some popularity—and they're easily made at home. Combine leftover fruits (cranberries or fruit tray leftovers are a great option) with apple cider vinegar in a jar, leaving the mixture to ferment for a week before straining out fruits and sitting for another seven days. After two weeks, a small amount of drinking vinegar can be mixed with soda water for an effervescent treat that's ever-so-slightly reminiscent of Thanksgiving.

15. Infused liquors

Jars of infused liquor.
iStock

If you're up for experimenting (and a bit of a wait), leftover fruit can be put to good use infusing and flavoring alcohol. Fruits like cranberries, apples, and pears work best, and even ingredient scraps like orange peels can be used to flavor vodka for homemade seasonal liqueurs.

16. soups

Bowl of turkey soup.
iStock

Soups are one of the easiest ways to clear out a refrigerator bursting with leftovers. Turkey is easy to add to almost any soup and can be frozen until you're ready to cook again. And, leftover soup can even be frozen for another cold day, though broth-based soups without pastas or creams store best.

17. Sobaheg stew

Bowl of stew.
iStock

Soup purists know that stew is not the same as soup; stews generally contains less liquid than a soup, have a thicker mixture of ingredients, and have a longer cook time. And while any combination of leftover vegetables and meat can make a great post-Thanksgiving stew, consider trying out Sobaheg, a dish culinary historians believe could have been served at the first Thanksgiving. Turkey meat, beans, hominy, green beans, and squash make up this historical stew.

18. Stocks

Glass jar of soup stock.
iStock

Instead of dumping leftover vegetables and meat bones in the trash, toss them into a stockpot with water for a hearty homemade stock. Even better: fresh stock can be frozen for the upcoming wintry days that require a hot bowl of soup.

19. Quick dips

Sweet potato dip.
iStock

Hosting family or friends for the entire holiday weekend? There's no need to worry about having extra snacks or appetizers on hand. Turn leftover beans or sweet potatoes into spreadable, hummus-style dips by blending with olive oil and seasonings of your choice.

20. Leftover fritters

Fried green beans.
iStock

Uneaten green beans don't have to sit in the fridge. Instead, toss in a cornmeal batter before frying for a crunchy leftover snack. As many Midwestern state fairgoers know, the deep-frying doesn't have to end there. Get creative and toss leftovers into oil for a hodgepodge of Thanksgiving fritters. Don't forget the ranch dip!

21. Nachos

Nachos.
iStock

Roasted turkey is easy to add to anything—including tortilla chips. While you can opt for traditional nachos with melted cheese and a turkey garnish, there's another option to clear out your fridge even faster: a Thanksgiving-style nacho using leftover gravy, potatoes, and stuffing. Mashed potatoes take the place of refried beans, and gravy is substituted for melted cheese, while stuffing creates a thicker base layer (along with the chips).

22. Freezer meals

Thanksgiving leftovers.
iStock

If you've spent all day in a hot kitchen basting a turkey, chances are after the big meal's served, you're already tired of looking at it. But don't let those pounds of extra meat and sides go to waste. Instead, package up plated meals for the freezer, which can be quickly defrosted and reheated on a day you really don't feel like cooking. Many Thanksgiving side dishes freeze and reheat well—including stuffing (or dressing), cranberry sauce, and breads. For best results, avoid freezing dairy-heavy dishes and casseroles with crunchy toppings that have a tendency to get soggy (such as green bean casserole).

23. Swap leftovers with a friend

Bowls of leftover food.
iStock

Does a friend have a great recipe that you love … but you won't get to gorge on thanks to Thanksgiving meal logistics? Consider sharing it the next day. Swapping a plate or dish with friends or family is one way to share a meal together, while also saving you from a week's worth of grandma's famous potatoes.

24. Send everything home with friends and family

Leftover turkey.
iStock

If you're dining with a large crowd, consider letting friends and family clear out your fridge space. Etiquette says it's up to the host to determine if leftovers will be dished out and shared, so don't be afraid to prepackage leftovers for guests, or simply let them have at it themselves. After all, Thanksgiving is all about sharing with family and friends—both the love and the food.

25. Turkified Waldorf

A Waldorf Salad on a plate with a fork
MSPhotographic iStock via Getty Images

The famous Waldorf salad, which NYC’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel first created in 1896, is a perennial favorite for salad lovers. Turkify it and add seasonal apples, grapes, nuts, and celery root to the mayo-yogurt dressing. The salad is certainly healthier than drinking straight gravy (and it tastes so good).

26. Turkey-zzini

A portion of Tetrazzini pasta with a hand holding a spoon lifting a spoonful out
from_my_point_of_view iStock via Getty Images

In the early 1900s, chef Ernest Arbogast supposedly invented the Italian casserole tetrazzini and named it after opera star Luisa Tetrazzini. However, the Knickerbocker Hotel in NYC claims to have been the originator. Either way, the alfredo-like casserole—which contains wine or sherry, turkey, mushrooms, spaghetti, and heavy cream—will hit the post-Thanksgiving spot.

27. Green Bean Shakshuka

A skillet of Shakshuka next to a board with bread and goat cheese
Lisovskaya iStock via Getty Images

Use leftover green beans (or green bean casserole) to make a healthy breakfast dish. Sauté the green beans and add arugula, whole eggs, and garnish with Middle Eastern spices.

28. Savory waffles

Close up of a golden waffle with butter on top
zkruger iStock via Getty Images

After Turkey Day, add protein—and a savory flavor—to waffles. Mix turkey with cheeses and spices and place in a waffle maker. You can add more turkey on top, and instead of syrup you can drizzle either warmed up or cold cranberry sauce, or—wait for it—gravy on the turkey.

29. Everything bagel breakfast sammies

Two hands hold a stuffed bagel sandwich with meat, cheese, and arugula
maaram iStock via Getty Images

This bagel sandwich has it all: cranberry cream cheese, mashed potatoes, turkey, poached eggs, and stuffing piled on an everything bagel (according to the recipe, it needs to be the everything variety). It’s like Thanksgiving dinner for breakfast. 

30. Pumpkin pie wontons

An open wonton wrapper with pumpkin puree inside next to a closed wonton and wonton wrappers
AmalliaEka iStock via Getty Images

What should you do with leftover cans of pumpkin puree? Mix it with cream cheese, sugar, cinnamon, all spice, ginger, and maple syrup—kind of like pumpkin pie. But instead of making a pie crust, stuff the filling into wonton wrappers and fry them up. Pair them with a caramel apple sauce and whipped cream.

31. Flan

A large flan on a plate with vegetables, bread, and a drink.
ribeirorocha iStock via Getty Images

Not enough Americans serve baked Spanish custard for the holidays, but they can remedy that and reuse mashed sweet potatoes and rum at the same time. Plus, it’s a nice alternative to pie.

32. Sangria

A glass of winter sangria with apples on a table with pine cones
Rimma_Bondarenko iStock via Getty Images

If you’re doing Thanksgiving right, then you won’t have leftover wine. But if you happen to have an extra bottle of dry white wine available, pour it into a cider-based sangria along with brandy, Concord grapes, apples, pears, and sparkling cider. 

33. The Moist Maker From Friends

A turkey and cranberry sandwich
bhofack2 iStock via Getty Images

On the December 10, 1998 episode of Friends, aptly entitled “The One With Ross’s Sandwich,” Ross Geller (David Schwimmer) creates a Moist Maker sandwich from Thanksgiving leftovers. He brings it to work and someone eats it. “Just a sandwich? That sandwich was the only good thing going on in my life,” he exclaims to his friends. In real life, chef/filmmaker Andrew Rea adapted the recipe on his website Binging With Babish. It’s complicated to make it from scratch, but if you already have leftover turkey, gravy, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, it’s quick to assemble. (Just maybe don’t take it to work like Ross did.)

34. Hot brown

An open faced sandwich with melted cheese and bacon on a plate
bhofack2 iStock via Getty Images

The Louisville-invented open-faced sandwich is basically broiled gravy and turkey on bread, with additional mustard, cheese, and bacon. Not only will you be eating one of the best sandwiches in the world, but you’ll also paying homage to Kentucky.

35. Turkey sloppy Joes

A sloppy joe sandwich on a plate
NoirChocolate iStock via Getty Images

“Classic sloppy joes get a healthy makeover,” the recipe reads. Substitute leaner turkey for beef, and then add carrots, onions, sweet relish, and tomato sauce.  Instead of placing the mixture between a bun, the recipe suggests pouring it over toast.

36. Quesadillas

Close up of a cheesy quesadilla on a platter next to a large knife
Lilechka75 iStock via Getty Images

Put that turkey (or goose, or whatever bird you ate on Thanksgiving) into a five-ingredient quesadilla. Place the turkey, Monterey jack cheese, and some leftover veggies like green beans and mushrooms into a tortilla and melt it. If you’re feeling adventurous, serve it with a side of cranberry salsa. Or for a more gourmet quesadilla, add sage and cranberry sauce.

37. Turkey and wild rice soup

A bowl of chicken and wild rice soup on a napkin next to a spoon.
bhofack2 iStock via Getty Images

In several indigenous cultures, wild rice is a staple—and it's often served during Thanksgiving meals. Put that leftover turkey, the rice, veggies, soy sauce, half and half, turkey stock, and herbs in a pot and let it all simmer together.

38. Gumbo that's worth the wait

A bowl of gumbo with rice on top and a spoon in the bowl
MSPhotographic iStock via Getty Images

Give New Orleans gumbo an unconventional post-Thanksgiving update in adding turkey (and traditional Andouille sausage), gravy, mashed potatoes (for serving), The Holy Trinity (onion, bell pepper, celery), cranberry sauce, and, gasp, Brussels sprouts. The ingredient list is long, and the roux takes around 30 minutes to make, but you can let the gumbo simmer for hours and do other things while waiting.

39. Potato balls

A pile of fried potato balls on a plate
margouillatphotos iStock via Getty Images

If you have leftover mashed potatoes, transform them into potato balls. These balls make a good appetizer or side dish. The key to the recipe is using a lot of cheese, and bacon (if you’re vegan, vegetarian, or kosher, leave the bacon out). Shape the mashed potato mixture into spheres, coat them with egg and bread crumbs, and drop them into a deep fryer. If you want to go a healthier, less fun route, then you can bake them instead of frying them.

40. Stuffing bites

A platter of traditional Thanksgiving stuffing in front of a bowl of cranberry sauce
MSPhotographic iStock via Getty Images

Knowing that some of the best foods are bite-sized, and that stuffing is one of the best parts about Thanksgiving, chef Sunny Anderson created a recipe for fried stuffing bites. All you do is squish the stuffing into cubes, coat the cubes with an egg wash then dredge with bread crumbs, and fry them until they’re golden brown. Serve the fried goodness with a cranberry-pesto dipping sauce.

41. Egg rolls

Close up of a plate of fried egg rolls
bhofack2 iStock via Getty Images

Whoever thought of putting Thanksgiving leftovers into egg rolls is a genius. Place mashed potatoes, cranberries, stuffing, and turkey into an egg roll wrapper. The tricky part is folding the the wrapper together. Once sealed, fry the egg rolls and serve them with gravy, of course.

42. samosas

Four fried samosas on a carving board with small dishes of tomato sauce and herbs
gaus-nataliya iStock via Getty Images

Vegetarians and vegans have a difficult time navigating the meat-heavy holidays, but the Food Network offers them salvation with vegetable samosas. Take puff pastry and fill it with mashed potatoes, any leftover veggies, curry powder, and other spices. Bake, don’t fry, the samosas, and if you feel like it, mix yogurt with leftover cranberry sauce for dipping.

43. Pierogies

A plate piled with fried pierogies
Liudmyla Chuhunova iStock via Getty Images

Similar to egg rolls, the nice thing about piergoies is you can shove whatever you want in there, including leftover stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, cheese, sweet potatoes, veggies, and meat. However, the day after Thanksgiving you might not feel like making pierogi dough from scratch. Fortunately, it’s not time-consuming. These are good either as an appetizer, side dish, or full meal.

44. Donate your leftovers

Outstretched hands give plates of food on a line at a homeless shelter
kuarmungadd iStock via Getty Images

More than 42.2 million Americans live in food insecure households, so that means the holidays can be a difficult time for those who don’t have access to food. If you find yourself with more leftovers than you know what to do with, consider donating the vittles to a food pantry, a food bank, or homeless shelter. Do your research so you know if your local food bank can handle what you're dropping off.

45. SALADS

A bowl of salad with olive oil being drizzled on top of it
MarianVejcik iStock via Getty Images

After a day or two of gut-busting meals, salads can help clear out your system. Leftover greens need to be used up before they wilt, and when topped with shredded turkey, nuts, and veggies like roasted carrots, this post-Thanksgiving salad just needs a stellar dressing to top it off. Luckily, using up leftover cranberries to make a vinaigrette takes about 10 minutes and clears the fridge at the same time.

10 Products for a Better Night's Sleep

Amazon/Comfort Spaces
Amazon/Comfort Spaces

Getting a full eight hours of sleep can be tough these days. If you’re having trouble catching enough Zzzs, consider giving these highly rated and recommended products a try.

1. Everlasting Comfort Pure Memory Foam Knee Pillow; $25

Everlasting Comfort Knee Pillow
Everlasting Comfort/Amazon

For side sleepers, keeping the spine, hips, and legs aligned is key to a good night’s rest—and a pain-free morning after. Everlasting Comfort’s memory foam knee pillow is ergonomically designed to fit between the knees or thighs to ensure proper alignment. One simple but game-changing feature is the removable strap, which you can fasten around one leg; this keeps the pillow in place even as you roll at night, meaning you don’t have to wake up to adjust it (or pick it up from your floor). Reviewers call the pillow “life-changing” and “the best knee pillow I’ve found.” Plus, it comes with two pairs of ear plugs.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Letsfit White Noise Machine; $21

Letsfit White Noise Machine
Letsfit/Amazon

White noise machines: They’re not just for babies! This Letsfit model—which is rated 4.7 out of five with nearly 3500 reviews—has 14 potential sleep soundtracks, including three white noise tracks, to better block out everything from sirens to birds that chirp enthusiastically at dawn (although there’s also a birds track, if that’s your thing). It also has a timer function and a night light.

Buy it: Amazon

3. ECLIPSE Blackout Curtains; $16

Eclipse Black Out Curtains
Eclipse/Amazon

According to the National Sleep Foundation, too much light in a room when you’re trying to snooze is a recipe for sleep disaster. These understated polyester curtains from ECLIPSE block 99 percent of light and reduce noise—plus, they’ll help you save on energy costs. "Our neighbor leaves their backyard light on all night with what I can only guess is the same kind of bulb they use on a train headlight. It shines across their yard, through ours, straight at our bedroom window," one Amazon reviewer who purchased the curtains in black wrote. "These drapes block the light completely."

Buy it: Amazon

4. JALL Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm Clock; $38

JALL Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm Clock
JALL/Amazon

Being jarred awake by a blaring alarm clock can set the wrong mood for the rest of your day. Wake up in a more pleasant way with this clock, which gradually lights up between 10 percent and 100 percent in the 30 minutes before your alarm. You can choose between seven different colors and several natural sounds as well as a regular alarm beep, but why would you ever use that? “Since getting this clock my sleep has been much better,” one reviewer reported. “I wake up not feeling tired but refreshed.”

Buy it: Amazon

5. Philips SmartSleep Wake-Up Light; $200

Philips SmartSleep Wake-Up Light
Philips/Amazon

If you’re looking for an alarm clock with even more features, Philips’s SmartSleep Wake-Up Light is smartphone-enabled and equipped with an AmbiTrack sensor, which tracks things like bedroom temperature, humidity, and light levels, then gives recommendations for how you can get a better night’s rest.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Slumber Cloud Stratus Sheet Set; $159

Stratus sheets from Slumber Cloud.
Slumber Cloud

Being too hot or too cold can kill a good night’s sleep. The Good Housekeeping Institute rated these sheets—which are made with Outlast fibers engineered by NASA—as 2020’s best temperature-regulating sheets.

Buy it: SlumberCloud

7. Comfort Space Coolmax Sheet Set; $29-$40

Comfort Spaces Coolmax Sheets
Comfort Spaces/Amazon

If $159 sheets are out of your price range, the GHI recommends these sheets from Comfort Spaces, which are made with moisture-wicking Coolmax microfiber. Depending on the size you need, they range in price from $29 to $40.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Coop Home Goods Eden Memory Foam Pillow; $80

Coop Eden Pillow
Coop Home Goods/Amazon

This pillow—which has a 4.5-star rating on Amazon—is filled with memory foam scraps and microfiber, and comes with an extra half-pound of fill so you can add, or subtract, the amount in the pillow for ultimate comfort. As a bonus, the pillows are hypoallergenic, mite-resistant, and washable.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Baloo Weighted Blanket; $149-$169

Baloo Weighted Blanket
Baloo/Amazon

Though the science is still out on weighted blankets, some people swear by them. Wirecutter named this Baloo blanket the best, not in small part because, unlike many weighted blankets, it’s machine-washable and -dryable. It’s currently available in 12-pound ($149) twin size and 20-pound ($169) queen size. It’s rated 4.7 out of five stars on Amazon, with one reviewer reporting that “when it's spread out over you it just feels like a comfy, snuggly hug for your whole body … I've found it super relaxing for falling asleep the last few nights, and it looks nice on the end of the bed, too.” 

Buy it: Amazon 

10. Philips Smartsleep Snoring Relief Band; $200

Philips SmartSleep Snoring Relief Band
Philips/Amazon

Few things can disturb your slumber—and that of the ones you love—like loudly sawing logs. Philips’s Smartsleep Snoring Relief Band is designed for people who snore when they’re sleeping on their backs, and according to the company, 86 percent of people who used the band reported reduced snoring after a month. The device wraps around the torso and is equipped with a sensor that delivers vibrations if it detects you moving to sleep on your back; those vibrations stop when you roll onto your side. The next day, you can see how many hours you spent in bed, how many of those hours you spent on your back, and your response rate to the vibrations. The sensor has an algorithm that notes your response rate and tweaks the intensity of vibrations based on that. “This device works exactly as advertised,” one Amazon reviewer wrote. “I’d say it’s perfect.”

Buy it: Amazon

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

5 Ingenious Tricks for Saving Burnt Cookies

"Please bake our brethren on the middle rack next time."
"Please bake our brethren on the middle rack next time."
cnicbc/iStock via Getty Images

It doesn’t take long for cookies to go from an irresistible golden brown to a dispiriting black (especially if you're baking at a high altitude). But before you toss them in the trash and start rummaging around in your pantry for a store-bought snack, we have a few suggestions for saving that imperfect batch.

1. Grate off the burnt bits of cookie with a zester or cheese grater.

As PureWow explains, all you have to do is slide the cookie along your cheese grater to get rid of the burnt layer on the bottom. The smaller the holes, the better, so a lemon zester works well for this, too.

2. Scrape the burned part of the cookie off with a knife.

If you don’t have a cheese grater, you can get the same results with a regular knife—it just might take you an extra minute or two. Instead of slicing off the entire bottom of the cookie, hold your knife blade perpendicular to the bottom of the cookie and carefully scrape away the burnt crumbs.

3. Store the burned cookies in a jar with a piece of bread.

Even after you’ve shaved off the blackened evidence of your culinary blunder, your cookies might still be crispier than you’d prefer. Store them in an airtight container with a slice of bread—they’ll soak up the moisture and soften right up.

4. Make ice cream sandwiches with your burned cookies.

Snobby snackers won’t scoff at your grated cookies if they can’t even see the bottoms. Slather one with a nice, thick layer of ice cream, slap another one on top, and roll the edges in your favorite topping for a treat that’s better than any cookie—burnt or not.

5. Transform your burned cookies into a cookie crust.

For charred, crunchy cookies that seem beyond salvation, you can completely cut off the burnt bottoms, crush the remains, and turn them into a cookie crust for a pie or cheesecake. Here’s a simple recipe from the Pioneer Woman that calls for three ingredients: cookie crumbs, butter, and sugar.