9 Secrets of Thrift Store Employees

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Whether you're a hardcore shopper who combs the racks of the Salvation Army regularly or rely on secondhand shops as a place to donate your old stuff, you may have wondered what it's like to work behind the scenes. Wonder no more: Mental Floss talked to several workers at thrift stores around the country about what happens to rejected donations, the coolest (and weirdest) items they've seen, and the best way to score an even better deal.

1. THEY DON'T KEEP EVERYTHING YOU DONATE.

thrift store clothes
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Thrift stores don't always keep all your donations, either because they don't have room or because items aren't in good enough condition for resale. But rest assured they try to responsibly redistribute or recycle what they can't use. Stacie Morrell, manager of Homeward Bound Pets Thrift Store in McMinnville, Oregon, tells Mental Floss that her non-profit has several destinations for unused donations. They take the best clothing to a local consignment store, generating another revenue stream; they give their "pulls" (items pulled off the racks that didn't sell) to the larger St. Vincent de Paul thrift store across town; and they send donations that aren't fit for resale to homeless shelters or a recycling facility.

Goodwill, where Morrell has also worked, has a different system. The stores send pulls and poor-quality items to Goodwill Outlets, where the stuff is set out in giant bins for customers to buy by the pound. That can mean gems for patient thrifters—the stores occasionally send donations to the outlets "raw," meaning they haven't even had time to open the boxes before sending them off. "It's like a treasure hunt," Morrell says.

For really unsalable merchandise, Goodwill sometimes finds overseas buyers, and they recycle what they can. If they can't recycle it, it goes in the trash. "They have huge garbage bills every month, into the millions," Morrell says.

2. THERE'S A MEANING BEHIND THOSE DIFFERENTLY COLORED TAGS.

A Thrift Town customer prepares to pay for her merchandise.
Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

If you shop at Goodwill, you'll recognize the colored plastic price tags on all the clothing. It's all part of a system for rotating inventory and keeping the merchandise fresh. Most Goodwill stores use five different colors and rotate them weekly in a regular pattern: A new batch of clothing going onto the sales floor might get a blue tag, for example, and next week's merchandise might get yellow. Every week on a Sunday, Goodwill puts the oldest color on sale for 50 percent off to help get it off the floor. If you can figure out your local store's color pattern, you can predict when an item that catches your eye will go on sale. Tip: Try (nicely) asking an employee.

Other thrift stores use different systems, but they usually have some way of tracking the date on their wares. At Homeward Bound, the month the merchandise arrived is written on the tag. "We have a sign up front that says, 'Items this month and before are 50 percent off,'" Morrell explains.

3. YOU MAY HAVE A BETTER SHOPPING EXPERIENCE AT A SMALL, NON-PROFIT STORE.

Woman shopping in London second hand marketplace
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Small businesses can mean a more friendly experience for the customer. "Most of the small thrift stores will be staffed by volunteers, so they want to be there," Morrell says. A volunteer at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, a secondhand shop in New York City, explained to us: "They're not in business to make money. They're a charity. … The people that work there understand that, that they're there to be helpful to each other and to the community."

Another benefit: Unlike chain stores, small stores may let you bargain. "If a person came up to me [with a pair of $15 pants] and said, 'I love these pants. I've only got 12 bucks on me,'" Morrell says, "I'd be like, 'Sure,' because that's 12 bucks I'd have in my hand rather than the 15 I didn't."

4. THEY MAKE A LOT OF MONEY SELLING ONLINE.

Debra Smyklo, 64, an assistant thrift store manager
Mark Makela, Getty Images

Believe it or not, your favorite thrift store probably has a thriving e-commerce business. When donations come in, employees separate out collectibles, books, and other higher-end items to sell online. That means it's worth checking out your favorite store's web presence occasionally. Goodwill, The Salvation Army, and Housing Works all have their own online stores, and sell books on Amazon, too. In fact, Housing Works Bookstore Cafe makes the majority of their money selling online, our source says. Mom-and-pop shops, on the other hand, might opt for eBay stores.

"For non-profit stores, e-commerce has become an essential part of selling," Morrell says. "I know a number of small business owners that, if they weren't online, they wouldn't be making the rent."

5. SOMETIMES THEY FIND REALLY EXPENSIVE ITEMS.

It doesn't happen often, but thrift stores sometimes come across a rare item and make a ton of money. Morrell set up the e-commerce department for Goodwill of the Columbia Willamette, where in 2006 she sold a 1923 watercolor by American impressionist Frank Weston Benson, whose work is also owned by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The price: $165,002. Morrell was sorting through donations one day when she came across the painting and instinctively knew it was worth something. "It was in its original frame, but the frame was beat up. It had been obviously in somebody's basement and the matting had gotten wet." The work was signed but she couldn't make out the name, so she listed it for auction on shopgoodwill.com starting at $10. The store was contacted by a relative of the late artist; apparently, the family didn't know this particular piece existed. After the watercolor was authenticated, the bidding soared until it reached the hefty sum.

6. THEY GET A TON OF FORMAL DINNERWARE.

Beautiful Antique China and glassware in old cabinet
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A much-talked-about 2017 New York Times article documented the unfortunate truth that millennials just don't want their aging parents' stuff, especially not their china, silver, and crystal. And that means that huge amounts of it go to the thrift shop. "Those are wonderful, beautiful things and they look great sitting on a shelf, but that's exactly where they stay. It's hard to sell them," Morrell says.

7. THEY'VE DEALT WITH A LOT OF BAD CUSTOMERS ...

In an article for Cracked, a former employee of a major thrift store chain writes that rich customers are often some of the worst. "The thrift store I worked at was in a really wealthy neighborhood, so obviously we got a solid handful of rich, bored housewives who'd come in out of idle curiosity for how the other half lives," she writes. "The wealthy customers would talk to me as if being around donated clothes meant that I was also some kind of discount, donated human. One such woman sneered when I told her an Abercrombie shirt was $2.99, because she expected it to be free, apparently. After I finished ringing her up, she stood by the register and pointed out every dismal aspect of our store like a judgmental stepmother."

The anonymous Housing Works source says, "I think the most horrible customer was the one when the cashier told her that we don't take Discover. She put her Discover card in the machine and said, 'Well, I'm going to try my Discover anyway,' and it caused the whole computer system to crash."

8. ... AND SEEN A LOT OF GROSS STUFF.

A mouse hiding in fabric
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Morrell has seen a lot of bodily fluids in her time in the industry. "I was working at Goodwill and I saw a mom grab her kid and hustle out the door. I thought, well maybe he's sick or something or she got an emergency call. I'm walking the floor and I go past the toy aisle, and the kid had pooped and spread it all over the floor."

A former Goodwill employee who did a Reddit AMA once found a rat at the bottom of a bag of clothing. "It made the entire back room smell, and we had to get rid of all the clothes."

9. THE OCCASIONAL BAD EMPLOYEE WILL TRY TO GAME THE PRICING SYSTEM.

"People think that we glean the good stuff off the top, but that is absolutely not true," Morrell says. However, while she emphasizes that the majority of employees are honest, she has seen a couple workers who see a treasure, furtively price it for less than they should, and buy it for themselves or to flip online. Usually, there are rules in place to prevent that: The manager prices everything when it comes in, and if an employee wants to buy something, someone else has to ring them up.

"Most people are fine with this, and if they aren't, that's a good sign that they shouldn't be there," Morrell says. "Our first job as employees and volunteers is to make sure the organization gets the most they can out of every donation."

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BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

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10 Secrets of Ice Cream Truck Drivers

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asiafoto/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Ever since Good Humor founder Harry Burt dispatched the first jingling ice cream trucks in Youngstown, Ohio, in 1920, kids and adults alike have had a primal reaction to the sight of a vehicle equipped with a cold, sugary payload. Today, ice cream trucks spend May through October hoping to entice customers into making an impulse beat-the-heat purchase. To get a better idea of what goes into making ice cream a portable business, Mental Floss spoke with several proprietors for their take on everything from ideal weather conditions to police encounters. Here’s the inside scoop.

1. IT CAN GET TOO HOT FOR BUSINESS.

The most common misconception about the ice cream truck business? That soaring temperatures mean soaring profits. According to Jim Malin, owner of Jim’s Ice Cream Truck in Fairfield, Connecticut, record highs can mean decreased profits. “When it’s really hot, like 90 or 100 degrees out, sales go way down,” Malin says. “People aren’t outside. They’re indoors with air conditioning.” And like a lot of trucks, Malin’s isn’t equipped with air conditioning. “I’m suffering and sales are suffering." The ideal temperature? "A 75-degree day is perfect.”

2. THEY DON’T JUST WANDER NEIGHBORHOODS ANYMORE.

An ice cream truck sits parked in a public spot
Chunky Dunks

The days of driving a few miles an hour down a residential street hoping for a hungry clientele have fallen by the wayside. Many vendors, including Malin, make up half or more of their business by arranging for scheduled stops at events like weddings, employee picnics, or school functions. “We do birthday parties, church festivals, sometimes block parties,” he says. Customers can pay in advance, meaning that all guests have to do is order from the menu.

3. SOME OF THEM DRIVE A MINIBUS INSTEAD OF A TRUCK.

For sheer ice cream horsepower, nothing beats a minibus. Laci Byerly, owner of Doodlebop’s Ice Cream Emporium in Jacksonville, Florida, uses an airport-style shuttle for her inventory. “Instead of one or two freezers, we can fit three,” she says. More importantly, the extra space means she doesn’t have to spend the day hunched over. “We can stand straight up.”

4. THEY HAVE A SECRET STASH OF ICE CREAM TO GIVE AWAY TO SPECIAL CUSTOMERS.

A picture of an ice cream truck menu.
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The goal of any truck is to sell enough ice cream to justify the time and expense of operation, so freebies don’t make much sense—unless the truck happens to have some damaged goods. Malin says that it’s common for some pre-packaged bars to be broken inside wrappers, rendering them unattractive for sale. He sets these bars aside for kids who know the score. “I put them in a little box for kids who come up and ask if I have damaged ice cream,” he says. “Certain kids know I have it, and I’m happy to give it to them.”

5. THEY’RE CREATING CUSTOM ICE CREAM MENUS.

An ice cream nacho platter is shown
Chunky Dunks

While pre-packaged Popsicles and ice cream sandwiches remain perennial sellers, a number of trucks are mixing up business by offering one-of-a-kind treats. At the Chunky Dunks truck in Madison, Mississippi, owner Will Lamkin serves up Ice Cream Nachos, a signature dish that outsells anything made by Nestle. “It’s cinnamon sugar chips with your choice of ice cream,” he says. “You get whipped cream, too. And for the ‘cheese,’ it’s a caramel-chocolate sauce.” The nachos work because they’re “streetable,” Lamkin’s label for something people can carry while walking. “The next seven or eight people in line see it, and then everyone’s ordering it.”

6. THEY DON’T ALWAYS PLAY THE ICONIC JINGLE.

Before most people see an ice cream truck, they hear that familiar tinny tune. While some operators still rely on it for its familiarity, Malin and others prefer more modern tracks. “Normally we play ‘80s rock,” he says. “Or whatever we feel like playing that day. We rock it out.”

7. POP CULTURE CHARACTERS ARE SOME OF THEIR BEST SELLERS.

A Captain America ice cream treat
Doodlebop's

While adult customers tend to favor ice cream treats they remember from their youth, kids who don’t really recognize nostalgia tend to like items emblazoned with the likenesses and trademarks of licensed characters currently occupying their TV screens and local theaters. “Characters are the most popular with kids,” Byerly says. “SpongeBob, Minions, and Captain America.”

8. THEY KEEP DOG FOOD HANDY.

At Doodlebop’s, Byerly has a strategy for luring customers with pets: She keeps dog treats on hand. “The dog will sometimes get to us before the owner does,” she says. “If the dog comes up to the truck, he’ll get a Milkbone.” That often leads to a human companion purchasing a treat for themselves.

9. SOMETIMES RIVALS WILL CALL THE COPS.

Though there have been stories of rogue ice cream vendors aggressively competing for neighborhood space over the years, Malin says that he’s never experienced any kind of out-and-out turf war. Ice cream truck drivers tend to be a little more passive-aggressive than that. “I have a business permit for Fairfield, so that’s typically where I’m driving,” he says. “But sometimes I might go out of town for an event. Once, a driver pulled up to me and asked if I had a permit. I said ‘No, I’m just here for an hour,’ and he said, ‘OK, I’m calling the cops.’ They try and get the police to get you out [of town].” Fortunately, police typically don’t write up drivers for the infraction.

10. SOME LUCKY CUSTOMERS HAVE AN APP FOR HOME DELIVERY.

An ice cream truck driver.
George Rose/Getty Images

Technology has influenced everything, and ice cream trucks are no exception. Malin uses an app that allows customers to request that he make a special delivery. "People can request I pull up right outside their home," he says. If their parents are home, there’s one additional perk: "I accept credit cards."

This article originally ran in 2018.