If you're like the majority of Americans, you're probably not exercising enough. According to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported by Fortune, less than a quarter of U.S. adults met the recommended amount of weekly aerobic and muscle-building activity between 2010 and 2015 [PDF].

The leisure exercise guidelines the CDC referenced were set in 2008: They suggest that adults complete at least 150 minutes of "moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity" a week, 75 minutes of "vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity," or a mix of the above. Just 22.9 percent of adults ages 18 to 64 met this criteria. For men, the national average was 27.2 percent, and for women, it was 18.7 percent.

The CDC study, which was released June 28, also broke down exercise habits by state. Colorado came in as the most active state, with 32.5 percent of residents meeting the exercise standards—nearly 10 percent more than the national average. People in Mississippi were the least likely to work out enough, with the average there coming out to just 13.5 percent.

CDC

While the CDC's study only looked at leisure exercise, it's possible the results would have been different if it had also looked at the physical labor we do for our jobs, or just the walks we take on our commutes. The CDC points out that people with physically demanding jobs or those who bike or walk to get around may be less likely to exercise in their free time, even if they're technically more active overall than the people who do.

No matter how you compare to the CDC's standards, it never hurts to find room in your schedule for more exercise. Not only does working out have physical health benefits, but it can improve your mental health as well by boosting your energy and helping you fight stress. Here are some tips for creating a fitness routine if you don't have one already.

[h/t Fortune]