What Are Tonsil Stones?

iStock
iStock

Sometimes, feeling like you have a lump in your throat has nothing to do with strong emotions. Sometimes, it’s just tonsil stones, those pebble-like white things that some people periodically find nestled inside their tonsils. Just what are these gross throat squatters?

The answer is both simple and complicated. Tonsil stones are normally white-ish yellow and can range in size from microscopic bits to chunks several centimeters in diameter. These tonsilloliths—the official medical term—are made of material that accumulates in the crevices of the tonsils.

You see, tonsils aren’t just smooth mounds of tissue. They have folds called tonsillar crypts that form pits in the tissue. The tonsils act as the body’s defender against any foreign substances that come in through your mouth, and tonsillar crypts increase the surface area of the tonsils to give them more of a chance to catch anything coming in that the body needs to mount an immune response to. A normal tonsil usually has dozens of crypts.

Just how tonsil stones are formed within those crypts is a little more complicated. Mental Floss spoke to three different otolaryngologists (ear, nose, and throat doctors) on the subject, and each of them provided slightly different answers.

An Atlas of Human Anatomy for Physicians (1919), The Internet Archive // Public Domain

Like any tissue in your body, tonsils are constantly regenerating. Just like your skin peels, that dead tonsil tissue gets sloughed off. It normally ends up going down your throat, but it can also get trapped in these crypts. There, bacteria from your mouth can start to grow on it, turning that material into a semi-hard stone that Dr. Erich Voigt, the director of general otolaryngology at NYU Langone Health in New York City, likens to “a cheesy ball.” (Apologies if we’ve now ruined cheese for you.)

Tonsillar crypts are the perfect environment for bacteria, because they’re poorly oxygenated but rich in blood supply. “It becomes an opportune area for the bacteria to populate and adhere to each other, and they form what’s called a biofilm structure,” Dr. Yosef Krespi, an otolaryngologist who practices in the North Shore-LIJ Health System in New York, tells Mental Floss. A tonsil stone is just a lump of biofilm, he says. In a 2008 study, he and his colleagues examined tonsilloliths in the lab, finding that structurally, they look a lot like dental plaque, another biofilm in the mouth.

But Dr. Jay Shah, a pediatric otolaryngologist at Cleveland’s University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, explains that the yellowish lump you remove from your throat isn't exclusively bacteria. When researchers have examined what tonsil stones are made of, he says, “there’s calcium, there’s sulfur—there’s a whole host of other elements within them,” he explains.

That's not to say the bacteria aren't involved. Scientists studying the microbial makeup of tonsil stones have found that the types of anaerobic bacteria commonly found around and inside tonsilloliths are associated with producing volatile sulfur compounds, which is why people with really bad cases of tonsil stones can suffer from bad breath.

While Voigt and Shah emphasized the tissue and keratin (proteins found in the lining of the mouth, as well as in hair and skin) from the tonsils that gets trapped in these crypts as the source of stones, other studies have noted that trapped food debris in the tonsillar crypts can cause tonsilloliths. One study even suggests they could be formed by trapped spit alone.

Often the tonsil stone that you see in your throat isn’t the whole thing, according to Krespi. You may only be seeing a portion that has broken off from the “mother” stone that’s still lodged down in a very deep tonsillar crypt, he says, meaning that you’ll continue to see stones. Voigt, however, says that while some patients do have recurring stones, for others, the problem is temporary and may go away after a few weeks or months.

Everyone has tonsillar crypts, dead skin cells, and bacteria in their mouth, but not everyone gets tonsil stones. “The biggest question is, why do some people get them and some don’t? We don’t know,” Shah says. Some people have bigger crypts than others in their tonsils, and, since it’s easier for stuff to accumulate in larger crypts, those people seem to be more likely to have a problem with tonsil stones. But large tonsil stones are very rare, and you’re much more likely to be dealing with a few harmless small tonsilloliths than a sizable stone. In general, tonsil stones are more common if you have a history of tonsillitis or just have large tonsils that have a lot of big nooks where bacteria can get trapped.

It’s hard to say just how common tonsil stones are. Some studies estimate their prevalence at around 8 percent of the population, while others suggest that they might affect as much as 25 percent of the population. Both of those might be low estimates. The researchers Mental Floss spoke to reported seeing them regularly in their practice, even in patients who weren’t aware that they had them.

The fact that there isn’t firm data on how many people deal with tonsil stones may reflect the fact that they don’t usually require seeing a doctor. As the authors of one large study on tonsil stones from a Japanese dental hospital noted in 2013, tonsilloliths are “relatively commonly encountered in daily clinical practice, but patients rarely have complaints related to them.”

Tonsillolith, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Because while it can be alarming (or, depending on your perspective, fascinating) to look into your throat and see white specks in the back of your mouth, tonsil stones are typically harmless. One ear, nose, and throat doctor likens them to acne of the tonsils. They’re a little gross, but for most people, tonsil stones don’t come with any major side effects.

In serious cases, big tonsil stones can cause trouble, leading to ear pain, difficulty swallowing, and other discomfort, but that’s fairly rare. Most people with tonsil stones manage to handle them without any medical intervention, removing them with a Q-Tip, a finger, or gargling with salt water. While a doctor has specialized tools that can be used to safely remove tonsilloliths, as long as you’re not poking something sharp into your tonsils or pushing them deeper into those crypts, you’re probably fine. If you’re prone to tonsil stones, Voigt suggests gargling with a 50/50 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water to clean out your tonsillar crypts. You can also use a water pick for the same task.

The only way to totally get rid of tonsil stones permanently is to remove the tonsils entirely. But for most people, gargling or a periodic Q-tip session works fine–and makes for some pretty good video.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

12 Creative Ways to Spend Your FSA Money Before the Deadline

stockfour/iStock via Getty Images
stockfour/iStock via Getty Images

If you have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), chances are, time is running out for you to use that cash. Depending on your employer’s rules, if you don’t spend your FSA money by the end of the grace period, you potentially lose some of it. Lost cash is never a good thing.

For those unfamiliar, an FSA is an employer-sponsored spending account. You deposit pre-tax dollars into the account, and you can spend that money on a number of health care expenses. It’s kind of like a Health Savings Account (HSA), but with a few big differences—namely, your HSA funds roll over from year to year, so there’s no deadline to spend it all. With an FSA, though, most of your funds expire at the end of the year. Bummer.

The good news is: The law allows employers to roll $500 over into the new year and also offer a grace period of up to two and a half months to use that cash (March 15). Depending on your employer, you might not even have that long, though. The deadline is fast approaching for many account holders, so if you have to use your FSA money soon, here are a handful of creative ways to spend it.

1. Buy some new shades.

Head to the optometrist, get an eye prescription, then use your FSA funds to buy some new specs or shades. Contact lenses and solution are also covered.

You can also buy reading glasses with your FSA money, and you don’t even need a prescription.

2. Try acupuncture.

Scientists are divided on the efficacy of acupuncture, but some studies show it’s useful for treating chronic pain, arthritis, and even depression. If you’ve been curious about the treatment, now's a good time to try it: Your FSA money will cover acupuncture sessions in some cases. You can even buy an acupressure mat without a prescription.

If you’d rather go to a chiropractor, your FSA funds cover those visits, too.

3. Stock up on staples.

If you’re running low on standard over-the-counter meds, good news: Most of them are FSA-eligible. This includes headache medicine, pain relievers, antacids, heartburn meds, and anything else your heart (or other parts of your body) desires.

There’s one big caveat, though: Most of these require a prescription in order to be eligible, so you may have to make an appointment with your doctor first. The FSA store tells you which over-the-counter items require a prescription.

4. Treat your feet.

Give your feet a break with a pair of massaging gel shoe inserts. They’re FSA-eligible, along with a few other foot care products, including arch braces, toe cushions, and callus trimmers.

In some cases, foot massagers or circulators may be covered, too. For example, here’s one that’s available via the FSA store, no prescription necessary.

5. Get clear skin.

Yep—acne treatments, toner, and other skin care products are all eligible for FSA spending. Again, most of these require a prescription for reimbursement, but don’t let that deter you. Your doctor is familiar with the rules and you shouldn’t have trouble getting a prescription. And, as WageWorks points out, your prescription also lasts for a year. Check the rules of your FSA plan to see if you need a separate prescription for each item, or if you can include multiple products or drug categories on a single prescription.

While we’re on the topic of faces, lip balm is another great way to spend your FSA funds—and you don’t need a prescription for that. There’s also no prescription necessary for this vibrating face massager.

6. Fill your medicine cabinet.

If your medicine cabinet is getting bare, or you don’t have one to begin with, stock it with a handful of FSA-eligible items. Here are some items that don’t require a prescription:

You can also stock up on first aid kits. You don’t need a prescription to buy those, and many of them come with pain relievers and other medicine.

7. Make sure you’re covered in the bedroom.

Condoms are FSA-eligible, and so are pregnancy tests, monitors, and fertility kits. Female contraceptives are also covered when you have a prescription.

8. Prepare for your upcoming vacation.

If you have a vacation planned this year, use your FSA money to stock up on trip essentials. For example:

9. Get a better night’s sleep.

If you have trouble sleeping, sleep aids are eligible, though you’ll need a prescription. If you want to try a sleep mask, many of them are eligible without a prescription. For example, there’s this relaxing sleep mask and this thermal eye mask.

For those nights you’re sleeping off a cold or flu, a vaporizer can make a big difference, and those are eligible, too (no prescription required). Bed warmers like this one are often covered, too.

Your FSA funds likely cover more than you realize, so if you have to use them up by the deadline, get creative. This list should help you get started, and many drugstores will tell you which items are FSA-eligible when you shop online.

10. Go to the dentist.

While basics like toothpaste and cosmetic procedures like whitening treatments aren’t FSA eligible, most of the expenses you incur at your dentist’s office are. That includes co-pays and deductibles as well as fees for cleanings, x-rays, fillings, and even the cost of braces. There are also some products you can buy over-the-counter without ever visiting the dentist. Some mouthguards that prevent you from grinding your teeth at night are eligible, as are cleaning solutions for retainers and dentures.

11. Try some new gadgets.

If you still have some extra cash to burn, it’s a great time to try some expensive high-tech devices that you’ve been curious about but might not otherwise want to splurge on. The list includes light therapy treatments for acne, vibrating nausea relief bands, electrical stimulation devices for chronic pain, cloud-connected stethoscopes, and smart thermometers.

12. Head to Amazon.

There are plenty of FSA-eligible items available on Amazon, including items for foot health, cold and allergy medication, eye care, and first-aid kits. Find out more details on how to spend your FSA money on Amazon here.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

What Is My Turkey Wearing Frilly Paper Hats On Its Legs?

All dressed up and nowhere to go.
All dressed up and nowhere to go.
Matt Cottam via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Donning a chef’s hat while you cook Thanksgiving dinner is one thing, but sticking a tiny one on the end of each crispy turkey leg seems like it might be taking the holiday a bit too far.

Over the years, these traditional paper coverings have been called many creative names, including turkey frills, turkey booties, and even turkey panties. And while they’ve fallen out of fashion in recent decades, they originally served a very specific purpose. According to 19th-century writer John Cordy Jeaffreson, paper trimmings gained popularity in the 17th century as a way for women to keep their hands clean while they carved meat.

“To preserve the cleanness of her fingers, the same covering was put on those parts of joints which the carver usually touched with the left hand, whilst the right made play with the shining blade,” he explained in A Book About the Table in 1875. “The paper-frill which may still be seen round the bony point and small end of a leg of mutton, is a memorial of the fashion in which joints were dressed for the dainty hands of lady-carvers, in time prior to the introduction of the carving-fork.”

When etiquette books started encouraging "lady-carvers" to use carving forks, the paper didn’t become obsolete—it just got frillier. During the 19th and 20th centuries, chop frills were a cute and classy way to conceal the unsightly leg bones of roast turkey, lamb, chicken, or any other bird. “Dress up any leggy food with them for parties or the children’s birthdays,” Iowa’s Kossuth County Advance wrote in 1951. “They will be thrilled.”

If you’d like to dress up a leggy food or two this Thanksgiving, here are some instructions for making your own chop frills, courtesy of HuffPost.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.