A few hours spent watching shark attack reenactments on TV is enough to convince you it's not safe to go back in the water. But sharks aren't exactly the mindless manhunters pop culture makes them out to be. According to these statistics compiled by the home security company SafeWise, shark attacks look a lot different in the real world than they do in movies and TV shows.

Between 2007 and 2016, 443 non-fatal shark attacks and seven fatal attacks were reported in the U.S. That suggests most sharks aren't looking to make a meal out of swimmers—when they do "attack" people, they usually take a bite because they're curious and swim away as soon as they realize they're not dealing with a fish.

Dangerous shark encounters are also incredibly rare. Your risk of being attacked by a shark is about 11.5 million to one. That means you're more likely to be struck by lightning or die from the flu than fall victim to a shark attack.

Your risk of encountering a shark also depends on where you choose to go for your beach vacation. Florida is the shark attack capital of America, accounting for 244 shark attacks over the span of a decade. Hawaii was the runner-up with 65.

If you still have a love-hate relationship with sharks, no one would blame you for skipping the beach this summer and binge-watching Shark Week instead. Here are some facts to brush up on before the Discovery Channel event launches July 22.